No Shortage

| | Comments (2)

There are so many things I could blog about. Orginally, I was going to blog on what a junketeer was or the List, but Dr. Jerz informed us of the meaning and the List is supposed to be something we won't know yet. Maybe I'll blog anout it later then.

I also want to blog about Jess's idea of some sort of cycle of payment or Karyssa's blog about the connections between J. and John Henry, but I also don't want to steal their ideas. I will blog about it in my last blog for this book: John Henry Days.

What I will comment on now is the attitude of John Henry and the crushing of the boy's hands. John Henry obviously feels somewhat bad. He comments on how his hands are terrorists and he seems to feel guilt at letting the second blow go even though there was nothing to stop him, but near the end he seems to care less. His focus is on the mountain and the tunnel digging.

"John Henry said he needed another shaker. The boss spat into the ground and nodded. There was no shortage of niggers" (86).

I wasn't surprised at the bosses tone because (I assume) he is white and it was the accepted attitude of the time. It seems here though that John doesn't care about the boy or about Paul with his head crushed in. He has the same process of thought of the boss. He mentions that the child is not the first person he has smashed up. John Henry's used to the work and the downsides of it. Perhaps also a little of slavery.

2 Comments

When I read just this section on John Henry, I thought that perhaps he felt remorse but there was nothing he could do about it. The only real attitude we get is from his boss. However, from other sections on John Henry, it seems like Whitehead is portraying him as a jerk.

Kayla Lesko said:

I think John Henry was more focused on his job than caring whether or not someone got hurt.

Leave a comment


Type the characters you see in the picture above.

 

Recent Comments

Kayla Lesko on No Shortage: I think John Henry was more fo
Karyssa Blair on No Shortage: When I read just this section