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October 31, 2005

The Glass Menagerie (Scenes 1-5)

Williams, The Glass Menagerie (Scenes 1-5) -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

Amanda: No, I don't have secrets. I'll tell you what I wished for on the moon. Success and happiness for my precious children! I wish for that whenever there's a moon, and when there isn't a moon, I wish for it, too."

Like a lot of other plays we have read so far in EL 250, the woman in this play, Amanda, is insecure about herself and her life but does not outwardly show it. She tries to live her life and regrets through her children, Laura and Tom, however, both suffer greatly from it. I feel bad for both the children. Tom feels like he needs to fullfil the position his father failed to, and because of that he isn't living out his dreams. Laura is so pressured by her mother to go to college and become successful, when she drops out she is so afriad to tell Amanda she wanders around in the middle of winter during school time. I know Amanda wants the best for her children, but instead it really is back firing and her children that she loves so much are actually suffering from it.

I also liked this quote by Tom.

Tom: "... But here there was only hot swing music and liquor, dance halls, bars, and movies, and sex that hung in the gloom like a chandelier and flooded the world with brief, deceptive rainbows..."

I just liked how Williams describes that situation. The language is so descripitive and it makes the reader really feel like they're there, too.

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The Glass Menagerie (Scenes 1-5)

Amanda: No, I don't have secrets. I'll tell you what I wished for on the moon. Success and happiness for my precious children! I wish for that whenever there's a moon, and when there isn't a moon, I wish for it, too."

Like a lot of other plays we have read so far in EL 250, the woman in this play, Amanda, is insecure about herself and her life but does not outwardly show it. She tries to live her life and regrets through her children, Laura and Tom, however, both suffer greatly from it. I feel bad for both the children. Tom feels like he needs to fullfil the position his father failed to, and because of that he isn't living out his dreams. Laura is so pressured by her mother to go to college and become successful, when she drops out she is so afriad to tell Amanda she wanders around in the middle of winter during school time. I know Amanda wants the best for her children, but instead it really is back firing and her children that she loves so much are actually suffering from it.

I also liked this quote by Tom.

Tom: "... But here there was only hot swing music and liquor, dance halls, bars, and movies, and sex that hung in the gloom like a chandelier and flooded the world with brief, deceptive rainbows..."

I just liked how Williams describes that situation. The language is so descripitive and it makes the reader really feel like they're there, too.

Posted by AmandaNichols at 12:31 PM | Comments (1) | TrackBack

October 27, 2005

Betty & Bill Fall in Love

Ives, "Sure Thing" -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

BILL: Amazing how you can live right next door to somebody in this town and never even know it.


I really really liked this play. I don't even know why, but I thought it was cute and a quick read and enjoyable. The above quote reminded me a lot of fate and how I think it was fate that brought Betty and Bill together.

I loved how they kept switching ideas or rephrasing sentences everytime the bell rang. It was like they said one thing, then a few different other possibilities, and the reader can pick on to go along with. Kind of like those books where you read them then you can pick an ending.

At first, Betty isn't open to talking with Bill, however, he is persistant and in the end they are like going to get married. Awww how romantic. :0)

I think this play in very universal. Any cafe, the names Betty & Bill, the light-hearted conversation.

How did others like the play?

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Shakespeare in the Bush

Bohannon, "Shakespeare in the Bush" -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

I really liked "Shakespeare in the Bush" a lot. Even though I have read Hamlet twice before, I actually understood things more clearly after reading this. I found myself laughing a lot throughout the play, too.

I love how the tribe people kept telling him he was wrong.

But again they objected. "Dead men cast no shadows."

"They do in my country," I snapped.

I also liked how it ended, with the tribe guy saying,

"Sometime," concluded the old man, gathering his ragged toga about him, "you must tell us some more stories of your country. We, who are elders, will instruct you in their true meaning, so that when you return to your own land your elders will see that you have not been sitting in the bush, but among those who know things and who have taught you wisdom."

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October 26, 2005

Shakespeare in the Bush

Bohannon, "Shakespeare in the Bush" -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

I really liked "Shakespeare in the Bush" a lot. Even though I have read Hamlet twice before, I actually understood things more clearly after reading this. I found myself laughing a lot throughout the play, too.

I love how the tribe people kept telling him he was wrong.

But again they objected. "Dead men cast no shadows."

"They do in my country," I snapped.

I also liked how it ended, with the tribe guy saying,

"Sometime," concluded the old man, gathering his ragged toga about him, "you must tell us some more stories of your country. We, who are elders, will instruct you in their true meaning, so that when you return to your own land your elders will see that you have not been sitting in the bush, but among those who know things and who have taught you wisdom."

Posted by AmandaNichols at 08:33 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

October 23, 2005

"As woman's love"

HAMLET

Is this a prologue, or the posy of a ring?

OPHELIA

'Tis brief, my lord.

HAMLET

As woman's love.


I love this line! I remember discussing this a lot in AP last year. Once again, Hamlet who is apparently crazy, gives a clever comeback. I think Hamlet could be talking about two different things in his above line. Gertrude's love was definitly short since she married her brother-in-law in within two months of Old Hamlet's death. Also, I think he could also be talking about Ophelia's love for him. I'm not sure. Any ideas about this quote?


ps. Has anyone ever read Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead?

Posted by AmandaNichols at 02:10 PM | Comments (2) | TrackBack

"As a woman's love"

Shakespeare, Hamlet (Acts 3-5) -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

HAMLET

Is this a prologue, or the posy of a ring?

OPHELIA

'Tis brief, my lord.

HAMLET

As woman's love.


I love this line! I remember discussing this a lot in AP last year. Once again, Hamlet who is apparently crazy, gives a clever comeback. I think Hamlet could be talking about two different things in his above line. Gertrude's love was definitly short since she married her brother-in-law in within two months of Old Hamlet's death. Also, I think he could also be talking about Ophelia's love for him. I'm not sure. Any ideas about this quote?

Posted by AmandaNichols at 02:08 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

"As woman's love"

Shakespeare, Hamlet (Acts 3-5) -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

HAMLET

Is this a prologue, or the posy of a ring?

OPHELIA

'Tis brief, my lord.

HAMLET

As woman's love.


I love this line! I remember discussing this a lot in AP last year. Once again, Hamlet who is apparently crazy, gives a clever comeback. I think Hamlet could be talking about two different things in his above line. Gertrude's love was definitly short since she married her brother-in-law in within two months of Old Hamlet's death. Also, I think he could also be talking about Ophelia's love for him. I'm not sure. Any ideas about this quote?

Posted by AmandaNichols at 02:02 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

October 19, 2005

Incestuous Sheets

Shakespeare, Hamlet (Acts 1 & 2) -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

HAMLET:
....O, God! a beast, that wants discourse of reason,
Would have mourn'd longer--married with my uncle,
My father's brother, but no more like my father
Than I to Hercules: within a month:
Ere yet the salt of most unrighteous tears
Had left the flushing in her galled eyes,
She married. O, most wicked speed, to post
With such dexterity to incestuous sheets!

It is not nor it cannot come to good:
But break, my heart; for I must hold my tongue.

This is defintly one of my favorite lines in the play, especially the bolded part. I read Hamlet last year in AP English and enjoyed it a lot. A lot of the quotes were familiar to me, but this one stuck out moreso than others. I like how Hamlet puts into words how his mother moved on so quickly.

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October 11, 2005

I'm not gonna lie...

Marlowe, Faustus (Finish) -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

Benvolio
First, on his head, in quittnce of my wrongs,
I'll nail huge forked horns, and let them hang,
Within in the window where he yoked me first,
That all the world may see my just revenge.

Martino
What use shall we put his beard to?

Benvolio:
We'll seel it to a chimney sweeper. It will wear out
ten birching brooms, I warrant you.

Frederick
Whats shall eyes do?

Benvolio
We'll put out his eyes, and they shall serve for buttons
to his lips, to keep his tongue from catching cold.


Wow, this Benvolio guy is one sick ticket. The above lines really creeped me out while reading this play. I found it very descriptive and if I were Faustus I'd be pretty darn scared for my life. But I'm not gonna lie, I like how Marlowe described how Benvolio and Frederick were going to do to Faustus, especially Benvolio's last line in the above excerpt, "...buttons to his lips, to keep his tongue from catching cold". It kind of gives me the chills just reading the descriptive language.

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October 09, 2005

PRIDE

Pride.
I am Pride; I disdain to have any parents. I am
like to Ovid's Flea; I can creep into every corner of a a
wench. Sometimes, like a periwig, I sit upon her
brow. Next, like a necklace, I hang about her neck.
Then, like a fan of feathers, I kiss her, and then tur-
ning myself to a wrought smock do what I list. But. fie,fye,
what a smell is here? I'll not speak a word more for a
king's ransom, unless the ground be perfumed, and covered
with cloth of arras.

I really liked how the Seven Deadly Sins came out and each said a line in the play. Of all of them: covetousness, envy, wrath, gluttony, sloth, and lechery, pride's lines most appealed to me. I did not understand a few of the words in Pride's lines, but after looking them up in a dictionary I had a better idea about what Pride is talking about. I think he did a good depitcion of what pride really is. Pride talks about how he can "creep into every corner of a wench", which when i looked up discovered 'wench' meant a young woman. And then Pride refuses to speak again because he doesn't like the smell of the ground and wants the area to be covered wth a tapestry.

Does anyone have any idea what Ovid's Flea is?

Posted by AmandaNichols at 09:58 AM | Comments (6)

October 06, 2005

Background

Various, York Corpus Christi Background -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

I really never heard of the Corpus Christi Plays before this class. I really think it's neat that such a huge event like that happened. I really found it intersting how there were competitions between the guilds. It's weird how, for example, thr star of David was connected through the candle makers, or how the bakers did the Last Supper.

Posted by AmandaNichols at 05:55 PM | Comments (0)

Dark & Light

Anonymous, York Corpus Christi Plays -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

I liked how in "Creation and the Fall of Lucifer" there were a lot of references and comparisons to light and darkness. In the reading, Lucifer was given the title "Bearer of Light" and frequently talks about "[his] brightness", "glorious glow", and "glittering gleams". However, towards the end his "brightness is black as coal". and at the end God "[parts] them in two" never to meet again. I thought that line was neat because it's actually pretty true, darkness and light do not meet.

Posted by AmandaNichols at 05:48 PM | Comments (0)

Stupid Soldiers

Anonymous, York Corpus Christi Plays -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

JESUS:
All men that walk by path or street,
My sufferings take heed unto.
Behold my head, my hands, my feet,
And fully feel, before you go,
If any mourning may be fit,
Or torment, equal this unto.
My father that all pain may quit,
Forgive these men who these things do.
What they do, know they not.
Therefore, father, I crave
Their sins be punished naught.
But see their souls to save.

1 SOLDIER:
Well, hark! He chatters like a jay.

2 SOLDIER:
I think he patters like a pie.

Jesus only has two speaking parts in this play and both times the stupid soldiers ake fun of him after. It's not like Jesus is even saying anything bad, he's telling the people they are going to be saved and their souls saved. They say he's "[chattering]" like he was saying mindless things, even though he's actually like forgiving the soldiers themselves for the sins they've committed.

Posted by AmandaNichols at 05:36 PM | Comments (0)

October 03, 2005

Creeeeeeeepy

Lindsay-Abaire, Fuddy Meers -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

I definitly like this play a lot. It really reminded me of the movie 50 First Dates. There were times, okay maybe like most of the play, that I was really creeped out by the characters and thier actions. "The Limping Man" is so sketchy. I thought he was creepy just from reading about the characters in the beginning. His description is: "about 40, a limping, lisping, half-blind, half-deaf man with secrets". Weeirrrd. And then the first line in the play from him is him coming out from under the bed....I was totally creeped out.

I found the play sad, also, especially at the end. The entire play had this comical feel to it and then as they are driving home Clair's husband and son are like begging her to stay awake so they could have "just a couple more minutes". Awww.

Gertie's speech problem really bugged me throughout the play. I found it quite annoying to have to keep looking up what she was trying to say in the back of the book. At some points in conversation, however, I laughed out loud at the relatives poking fun at her speech problem and Claire's amnesia. I know, I am a horrible person, hah.

I'm curious to know why the play is about "funny mirrors"? Anyone have any ideas?

Posted by AmandaNichols at 08:38 PM | Comments (6)

October 02, 2005

Dead Man Walking

Amanda Nichols
Dr. Jerz
EL250
20 September 2005
Preordained Cruelty
I think the plays we read just keep getting better and better. I really enjoyed “Dead Man Walking”. Even though I have done papers and a speech on being against the capitol punishment before, after reading the play and seeing the film I feel even stronger against it. I felt sympathy for Matt throughout the play, especially towards the end. I think the author didn’t want the reader necessarily to feel sorry for him until his death neared because what he did was wrong and did indeed destroy the parents’ life. However, at the end Matt finally not only realized what he’d done, but admitted it to Sister Helen. I also felt really sorry for his family and that he couldn’t hug his mother before visiting hours were over. I’m glad he admitted to the crimes he committed at the end. All along I hoped he really was telling the truth, but I’m glad he cleared his conscience.
I felt the same way as several of my peers. Andy and I shared some of the same views about how strong of a person Matt was. He desperately needed someone to trust and as Andy said, “Helen was that person and she seemed to draw it out of him.” However, I still wonder if Helen picked up her cross necklace after going through the metal detector. Is that a significant part of the play?

Posted by AmandaNichols at 08:08 PM | Comments (0)

October 01, 2005

A Learning Experience

Amanda Nichols
Dr. Jerz
El 250
29 September 2005
A Learning Experience
“Don’t be stressed”, said senior Katie Aikins a mere twenty-four hours before the presentations were due. Her blonde curls bounced and she smiled and giggled as if this assignment were as easy as baking a cake. A few of us from EL 250 were eating lunch and stressing over the quickly approaching oral presentation deadline. We tried taking her advice, but being virgins at this thing called college, we crammed, we stayed up half the night, we laughed. We were freshman.
On Friday, September 23, 2005 oral presentations were presented to a small group of peers from the Drama as Literature class. Prior to my presentation I only had a general idea of what was going to be needed in the project. Sitting out on the porch in the Administration building, about eight classmates and I presented our projects. In my oral presentation, I compared Anna in The Jeweller’s Shop and Helen in Machinal, who both suffered from a lost love. I presented most of my speech from note cards, but learned that others in my group did not have any “cheat sheets“, which made their presentation appear cleaner and it looked like they really knew what they were talking about. I picked up a lot of good ideas while watching others present. Katie Aikins did an awesome job, in my opinion. She stood up and walked around, using hand movements to emphasize her point. Unlike her, the rest of us presented ours while sitting down. I felt more like a student in class in Katie’s presentation and definitely learned the most from hers.
During my presentation I talked to my classmates about how Anna in The Jeweller’s Shop and Helen in Machinal both had fascinations with men that made them feel better and have a slight glimmer of hope. Although I stayed seated while presenting, I thought I kept the interest of my audience. After my presentation was given, everyone around the small group said it was good. I did not have much peer feedback, but the people who did contribute were helpful. Katie jumped in right away and said that I had made a good comparison between the women in Machinal and The Jeweller’s Shop. Denamarie also commented on my presentation. She told me it was informative, but may need to be a bit longer and said I should be more comfortable with what was on my note cards.
All in all I really learned a great deal from this presentation. I stressed a lot about it the night before because I was never too good at giving speeches or talking in front of a groups of peers. However, the oral presentations were much different that I had expected. Splitting off into small groups in quiet areas on campus broke the tension. In addition, the “speech” I had thought I was going to have to give was not like a speech at all, but more like having a discussion about the plays we have read with a few people. Everyone’s discussion really taught me something. I picked up on several connections between plays I did not before the presentations were assigned. I also found it interesting to see who noticed what in each play. The constructive criticism was helpful and didn’t make me feel like I was an idiot and helped me a great deal when writing this reflection paper.


Amanda Nichols
Dr. Jerz
EL 250
29 September 2005
Changes
Compared to the reflection that was due for Monday for my oral presentation, several changes have been made. My previous reflection was quite short. In this one, I explained more aspects of my presentation in detail. In my introduction paragraph I talked about what went on the crazy night before the assignment was due. I also included other presentations and the differences in our body language as my classmates and I presented.
Unlike the last reflection paper, I talked about my argument a little more. I also walked my reader through what actually went on as I presented my comparison between plays. I actually wrote the peer feedback I got instead of just saying that I simply got peer feedback. Lastly, in this reflection paper I wrote a solid conclusion and talked more in detail about what exactly I learned from the oral presentations.

Posted by AmandaNichols at 10:37 PM | Comments (1)

Weblog Portfolio EL 250

Plays
Wilde, The Importance of Being Earnest
Uncaring Mothers
Woman finds husband dead
Do we rape the rapist?
The Jeweller's Shop
Sophocles, Oedipus the King (Up to Scene III)
Sophocles, Oedipus the King (Finish)
Rix, 'Was Oedipus Framed?'

Reflections
Dead Man Walking
A Learning Experience


Other Readings

How to Read Literature Like a Professor

Posted by AmandaNichols at 08:58 PM | Comments (0)