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November 26, 2005

Tragedy And The Common Man

Miller, ''Tragedy and the Common Man'' -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

"I think the tragic feeling is evoked in us when we are in the presence of a character who is ready to lay down his life, if need be, to secure one thing--his sense of personal dignity."


I think Arthur Miller described the tragic hero really well. People I look at as heros are ones who are willing to lay down there life in order to save others - firemen, police officers, soldiers in Iraq.

"If all our miseries, our indignities, are born and bred within our minds, then all action, let alone the heroic action, is obviously impossible."

I really liked this quote, as well; however I'm not to clear on what it means. HA. Give me some feedback!

Posted by AmandaNichols at November 26, 2005 10:27 PM

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Comments

Well, for starters, if the world of the mind and the world of action are so separate, then how can one affect the other? Remember that the root meaning of "drama" is "to do," not "to think" or "to feel."

Posted by: Dennis G. Jerz at November 27, 2005 08:59 AM

I think that is a good explanation Dr. Jerz. And I think Miller is trying to say that they are not so separate, it is jus that in today's world, we seem to want them to be separate, we want to think of everything in the "psychiatric view of life" (Miller 2). He is using this as a reason there aren't many modern tragedies, but is saying that this is not really the way things are. Thought and action have to be related or else wouldn't have drama in the first place. We need to recognize that our actions are derived from our thoughts.

Amanda, I hope you are using this essay as a source for your term paper. There is so much in here that you could use!!!!

Posted by: Lorin Schumacher at November 28, 2005 02:18 PM

Just like all areas in life, it's a big circle (yes I know this is my favorite metaphor). Without our thoughts, there is no action, but thoughts also grow from our actions.

Posted by: Katie Lambert at November 28, 2005 04:53 PM

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