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Poetry Talk

Hamilton, Essential Literary Terms (68-97) -- Jerz: EL150 (Intro to Literary Study)

"poetic diction, which in a broad sense means phrasing and vocabulary that are characteristic of poetry, as distinguished from the informality of everyday speech."

Even when I was little and read Dr. Seuess, I wondered if people actually spoken in poems. After reading the section on poetic diction, I had to laugh to myself, because for so many years I have been curious to the reason behind the poetic diction, but didn't really know that is was a literary term. I guess I just didn't understand it at all. Words such as ne'er instead of never...did they not want to type the "v"-well now I get it!!! Of course I wouldn't change this about poetry, but I just was always curious to why they wrote this way.

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Comments (3)

Margaret Jones:

Ha Bethany, I had to laugh when I read your blog because I could neVer figure out why sometimes people wrote ne'er. Ha I mean how hard is it to put the V in there, but now I understand why. Ha I am just glad I wasn't the only one who thought this.

Corey Struss:

I know what diction means now. Yay.

I found it pretty interesting that both you and Maggie didn't know why certain writers use 'ne'er'. I didn't know myself, but thanks to Mrs. Hamilton (aka the Messiah), we are one step closer to literary comprehension as a whole.

Hooray for us. :)

Lorin:

You all crack me up. The Messiah? I'm not sure I would go that far, but I'm glad you are all finding positive things about the readings and you are learning something from them. After all, that is the point.

Anyway, I just wanted to comment on what you said Bethany about wondering if people spoke in poems. Well, actually, many stories that were told orally were told in a more poetic form using lots of rhyming and rhythmic techniques in order to make stories easier to remember so they could be passed on.

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