October 2007 Archives

"Once I Would Have Gone Back...But Not Any Longer"

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"We need, therefore, a kind of parallel history of, let us say, victimsation, which would counter the history of success and victory. To memorize the victims of history...should be a task for all at the end of this century" pg 157

"Once I Would Have Gone Back....But Not Any Longer": Nostalgia and Narrative Ethics in Wide Sargasso Sea

There is a reason for everything, a reason for all actions. Literature would fail if there were characters running around acting without a purpose. Flat characters do not make a compelling read. In my studies as an actress, I have learned one very valuable lesson: you cannot play emotions. The same, I believe, can hold true for a novel, for what is a book but a script of someone's life? (Rhys writes that "for me, (and for you, I hope) she must be right on stage) (158).The reader does need to see what happened to Antoinette that brought her to England and affected her mind so. The reason is not so that they will sympathize with her, for we all react differently to characters (for instance: I have spoken to many on the character of Severus Snape in the Harry Potter series. His character was of great discussion lately, due to the series' recent end. Some feel sympathetic for him, others feel no empathy). We need to understand why Antoinette goes mad, but we do not need to sympathize with her. How un-compelling would Les Miserables have been if the character of Javert had been presented as just evil? There needed to be the backstory of his childhood and heritage in order for the reader to see him as more than one-dimensional. And some people still think he's an evil bastard, but at least they understand why

My question to you is: for whome do you more feel, Jane or Antoinette? And why? What other literary "villians" do you feel for? Which ones do you not and why?

 

*yes, yes I know Dr Jerz, this is drama as literature, not to be envisioned on stage, but I am going to make a fairly valid point.

Don't you know that time is not my friend...

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"to narrate is to live, to order a life, to "make sense" out of it" pg. 197

"And it Kept its Secret"

Such was a concept I had not previously thought of. Many people might say that a character's descent into madness is seen through their actions. Mezei argues that as long as Antoinette can narrate her story, she can hold on to her sanity. Which, if you think about it, makes sense. In the beginning, Antoinette retells the story of her childhood with pain-stakingly accurate details. However, as time passes in the book, her narration becomes increasing muddled, Grace Poole's voice entering the novel. The reader sees Antoinette slipping into madness, FORCED madness, as her narrative wanes. Her life, no confined to an attic, no longer makes sense. Ergo, neither do her words. (she believes her attic is not part of England). Humans like to be in control; the mind is the one thing we have total control over. And when it goes, the rest of your life falls apart.

 

My question to you is this: can a character narrate their story effectively and also be mad? can you give examples of this in other novels? Can a lunatic be perfectly coherent?

It's all HIS fault

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"In Wide Sargasso Sea, he is the immediate manifestation and enforcer of the network of patriarchal codes (sexism, colonialisn, the English Law, and the "law" which demarcates and creates sanity and insanity" (1)

Edward Rochester and the Margins of Masculinity in Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea

Well, if that isn't one of the most feministic statements I've ever heard. But, the theory of a man causing lunacy is an interesting thought. I mean, all the signs were there. When exactly did Rochester start behaving indifferent towards Antoinette? After he receiced that letter from her brother. Shortly afterwards, we saw a remarkable change in Antoinette (a change for the worse). As Rochester's hold became increasingly tighter on her, her behavior became more and more eractic. Antoinette fought, until the end, for freedom from Rochester's hold, and ultimately received it by freeing her soul from its earthly prison, her physical body.

In the letter, Antoinette's brother wrote to Rochester that her mother had alos shown signs of lunacy. After Cosway's death, Annette felt isolated, namely because the natives hated her, being the wife of a former slave owner/trader. But, her behavior took a turn for the worse when she met Mason who, like Rochester, seemd at first bearable. How many times did Annette tell Mason she wanted to leave the island because she didn't feel safe? Yet, did her permit her to? No. Mason kept his wife on so tight a leash that she too was driven insane.(his decision also resulted in the loss of Piere).

Men are pigs (the Victorian ones, at least....)

It's all HIS fault

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"In Wide Sargasso Sea, he is the immediate manifestation and enforcer of the netwoek of patriarchal coes (sexism, colonialisn, the English Law, and they "law" which demarcates and creates sanity and insanity" (1)

Edward Rochester and the Margins of Masculinity in Jane Eyre and Wide Sargasso Sea

Well, if that isn't one of the most feministic statements I've ever heard. But, the theory of a man causing lunacy is an interesting thought. I mean, all the signs were there. When exactly did Rochester start behaving indifferent towards Antoinette? After he receiced that letter from her brother. Shortly afterwards, we saw a remarkable change in Antoinette (a change for the worse). As Rochester's hold became increasingly tighter on her, her behavior became more and more eractic. Antoinette fought, until the end, for freedom from Rochester's hold, and ultimately received it by freeing her soul from its earthly prison, her physical body.

In the letter, Antoinette's brother wrote to Rochester that her mother had alos shown signs of lunacy. After Cosway's death, Annette felt isolated, namely because the natives hated her, being the wife of a former slave owner/trader. But, her behavior took a turn for the worse when she met Mason who, like Rochester, seemd at first bearable. How many times did Annette tell Mason she wanted to leave the island because she didn't feel safe? Yet, did her permit her to? No. Mason kept his wife on so tight a leash that she too was driven insane.(his decision also resulted in the loss of Piere).

Men are pigs (the Victorian ones, at least....)

Wicked, Crazy, and Opposite

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"I've ner believed in  Charlotte's lunatic, that's why I wrote the book" (2)

Double (De)Colonization and the Feminist Criticism of Wide Sargasso Sea

Bronte's curiosity drove her to write "Sea". There just had to be a back story, for how often are people actually born crazy? There had to be a motivation for "Bertha" to try and kill Rochester and Mason, not to mention the grand finale fire. She gave a name, face and background to a minimal but very essential character in Jane Eyre. I am reminded of another author: Gregory Maguire. In his novel Wicked, Maguire tells the background story of a small but integrative character in The Wizard of Oz: the wicked witch. By giving her a name (Elphaba Throp) and a backstory (she, having green skin, was a victim of racism her entire life, though her condition was no fault of her own). In giving "character" to these figures, Maguire and Rhys humanize their actions. Both Elphaba and Antoinette were not orginally wicked or crazy, they were forced to become so by the circumstances life threw at them. I defy you to read The Wizard of Oz or Jane Eyre without feeling differently towards Glinda or Rochester.

 

"Rhy's West Indian protagonist faced the same sexual constraints and ideologies as the heroine of Bronte's imperial narrative" (3)

I just had to include this in my blog. It seems my line of thinking agrees with that of  the 1970's feminists, because they too have noticed all the simularities between Jane and Antoinette. There is a phrase in the next sentence of the paper that combines the issues of race, ethnicity, class, and nationality into something called a "matrix of domination", meaning that all these factors shaped Jane and Antoinette's psychological turn-outs. Mardorossian fugres that Jane and Antoinette are the opposite ends  "two sides of the same coin": both were surrounded by domination and oppression from the matrix their entire lives, but both reacted differently.

Only Chicken????

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"If the the media seldom excel at quantifying risk, that is largely because doing so might get in the way of telling a good (by which we mean an exciting, not necessarily an accurate) story related to risk"- pg 116

IANS

Wow, talk about something being blown out of proportion. The sinlge most vivid memory of my childhood is the infamous meat scare of 1995. People just immediatly hit the panic button, and no one hit it harder than my own mother. I was banned from having meat. There was no Taco Bell, McDonald's, or Burger King for me. In the rare instances where I was allowed to get something from one of these places, my mother would say "you can only get chicken because you will die if you eat a hamburger". Constantly, I'd hear "do you want to end up like that kid from Seattle". This way of thinking was burned into my head so much that I actually started to believe that I would die if I ate beef. When my grandmother made steaks, I wasn't allowed to eat them, because I'd die if I do. Instead, I had the "pleasure" of eating Turkey Burgers (and those things are really freaking gross). This E. Coli scare caused so much panic through the US. I even remember there even being a TV show about a kid who died after eating an ill-prepared burger. (Teen Angel). 

Don't even get me started on my mom and Mad Cow Disease...(let's just say I have felt a little like a rebel any time I eat beef)

While there was much unnecessary panic (if meat was evil, all the fast-food restraunts would no longer exist), I guess I do understand the activist's point of view (albeit extreme). I guess if you want something done about an issue that might pose a risk, such as Global Warming or the few instances of death/sickness from E Coli, activists must "offer up scary scenarios, make simplified, dramatic statements, amd make little mention of any doubts we might have" (117) to get support. (Of course, way too many people like my mother could buy into the scare and businesses would greatly suffer.) It is not the activists' goal to have people live in fear, but to have just enough fear to do something about a problem. I suppose there are extremes in everything we come across in life.

 

I had my first burger junior year during a rehearsal for my school's haunted house. And it was good. As much I I love you, McDonald's Chicken Nuggets, you are no longer the only menu option.

random side note: I am kind of excited because I just found clips of Teen Angel on youtube

Not technically "lying", but........

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"news stories don't probe deeply enough, so they don't show how the data are amenable not only to one "obvious reading, but also to a second, less apparent reading that can draw a radically different conclusion from the same data" (86)

Chapter 5

IANS

We look to statistics and number as solid evidence, as proof of a fact. IANS states that we shouldn't take statistics we see in the news at face-value, because they tend to stress the importance of numbers, and not their significance. Yes, it may be true that women in 1995 accounted for 19% of adolescent/AIDS cases, their "highest yet". But what about the men's cases? This was only a portion of the data. In reality, the total cases among males and femals fell; it just happens that the female cases of AIDS did not fall nearly as much as the men's cases did. Thus, the actual number of women cases fell, but in relation to the total amount, the percentage had to be adjusted to account for the shift in numbers, (which was larger in relation to men's cases).

 

So the findings were presented as bad information, but in reality, they were good! (We can find these "omissions" if we read data carefully....the key in reading this data is "women's" cases)

We must understand that as numbers change, so do percentages. (for example: I have a presidential scholarship. It is a percentage of my tuition. Tuition went up significantly this year. My scholarship went up. Did that mean I was getting a bigger scholarship, more money? No, all it means is that my scholarship was adjusted to the tuition hike)

read a little closer

No offense, but that's not what I asked..

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I felt that President Boyle was sort of evading my question, just trying to build up the team. No negative effects by football players on campus? There have to be at least some. I have witnessed them! I lived in the same building with a bunch of players last year, and let me tell you, there were major problems. We had a fine at least once a month for something that was damaged. And none of the honors freshmen were the culprits. There were almost weekly alcohol busts.

I have also overheard players saying they are just here to play football, and that all they wanted to do when they got out was "be a coach". Some may not be here for an education.

 

Dr Boyle certainly has a way with words. She avoids being controversial when answering questions, being careful not to offend anybody.

 

I still want to explore the negative effects the players may have had on campus.

And yet......

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"I have sold my soul or you have sold it, and after all is it a bad bargain? The girl is thought to be beautiful, she is beautiful. And yet...." (70)

-Rochester to his father, Wide Sargasso Sea

well, we can tell from the opening line that Rochester is not happy with his father. Understandably so, since he has just been forced to marry someone because he is the second son, and therefore someway inferior to the first. He will not inherit any money, and must marry into a family that has money. On his honeymoon, it appears as if he is seeing Antoinette for the first time. He has been deliroius with fever, and does not recognize her. He can tell Antoinette is not happy, her "pleading expression" begging for him to let her go (just a thought! not a statement, Dr Jerz). They do not even know each other.

My question is: what do you think his "and yet.." comment could mean?

maybe he means that he sees a streak of madness in her, something that does not seem right.

or perhaps since he is english and she a creole, it is an issue of race. She's beautiful, but mixed, so that somehow takles away from her beauty. She would be pretteir had she been pure english.

Genetic Lunacy

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"You're blind when you want to be blind, and you're deaf when you want to be deaf"- pg 18

Wide Sargasso Sea

 

Antoinette (or "Bertha" as she is called in Jane Eyre) was pre-disposed to odd behavior. She grew up hated by the natives because she was a mixed child, half jamacian and half english. Antoinette lived in basically isolation her entire childhood because no one wanted anything to do with her or her family (the quote meaning that people ignore what they do not want to deal with). She is considered neither black nor white. She belongs to no group. Her mother began to lose it, talking to herself and neglecting her children. . All Antoinette wanted was a friend, and it seems the only friend she had was Christophine, the maid. (maybe like Bessie was to Jane?). While Antoinette spent the rest of her childhood in a convent, Jane spent hers at Lowood (which was practically a convent). With no one who cared about her in the world (it seemed) it is a wonder how similar her and Jane's childhoods were, yet how differently they both turn out.

An Unclear Truth

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"Coverage can easily mislead when reporters don't make it sufficiently clear that premature science may well not offer the truth" pg 36, Chapter Two-It Ain't Necessarily So

Right away, I thought of one major issue that has been in the news the past two years: global warming. Some have called it a myth, which it isn't. A better term would be "theory". Global warming is a theory that scientists have come up with based on behaviors in the Earth's tempertature. But nothing has been proven. Further research is needed. However, the newspapers have been treating it as if global warming is the beginning of the end of the world. BUT WE DON'T KNOW THAT FOR SURE BECAUSE NOTHING HAS BEEN PROVEN!!! Now, theory is causing panic, due to "premature science", The Day After Tomorrow (a movie based on the THEORIZED results of global warming), and a certain over-hyped documentary (which will remain nameless) made by a certain ex-vice president. Get the facts straight.

 

Then start panicking.

Paranoia

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"we stand at risk of being actively mislead by misunderstanding. We can come to know or believe some "information" about ourselves or our world that directly contradicts the real state of affairs" pg. 3, IANS

I never considered this. We take the news for granted, assuming what is printed is the truth. It is a journalist's job to be a "guardian of the truth". We are told information by people we assume are reliable sources, but we can never be too sure. There is only one way of knowing if a person is really telling the truth: let's face it, your interviewee will probably not be very willing to talk to you if they are hooked up to a polygraph machine. We use our judgement: what facts and statements should we include in our article? Our readers will never know all of what was said during the interview: it is our job to decide what is significant enough to be published. We are all different people, and thus has different judgement standards. Therefore, the news can never be totally subjective.

Not that I'm now paranoid......

Paranoia

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"we stand at risk of being actively mislead by misunderstanding. We can come to know or believe some "information" about ourselves or our world that directly contradicts the real state of affairs" pg. 3, IANS

I never considered this. We take the news for granted, assuming what is printed is the truth. It is a journalist's job to be a "guardian of the truth". We are told information by people we assume are reliable sources, but we can never be too sure. There is only one way of knowing if a person is really telling the truth: let's face it, your interviewee will probably not be very willing to talk to you if they are hooked up to a polygraph machine. We use our judgement: what facts and statements should we include in our article? Our readers will never know all of what was said during the interview: it is our job to decide what is significant enough to be published. We are all different people, and thus has different judgement standards. Therefore, the news can never be totally subjective.

Not that I'm now paranoid......

The Eye of the Beholder

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"I thought you would be revolted, Jane, when you saw my arm, and my cicatrized visage"
-Rochester to Jane, pg. 485
Jane Eyre

But she was not. She loved him more than ever. Jane was never told she was pretty growing up. Being told she was plain had an effect on our heroine: she has learned to look past appearances. While her education at Lowood might have been strict, it nonetheless taught her and the rest of the girls a vaulable lesson:beauty is not what matters in life. Since the girls were made to dress uniformly, they learned to appreciate innner beauty, learning to love the soul and appreciate personality. Jane never thought Rochester was aesthetically pleasing ("do you think me handsome.....no sir" pg. 149) His mind, his wit is what captivated Jane. The fire did not destroy that; it remained intact. "Beauty" can fade, but your mind stays with you your whole life.

"I want to be astonishing"

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I had no newswriting experience before this class. I had no knowledge of journalistic style and format. While I did write three articles for the Setonian last sem, I was basically flying by the seat of my pants. ("winging it" would be the term). The workload for this course did start to pile up (those of you who have Dr Jerz for two classes at the same time can attest to this stress), but I managed to keep up to date with all my assignments. I am a better writer for having piad close attention to what has been said, and what has been written. I'm not setting out to be a famous writer, I just want to make people think (further aspirations include Rolling Stone and The Village Voice). In short, I want to be astonishing.

"I only know I'm meant for something more.I've got to know if I can be astonishing"-Jo March, Little Women: the musical

 

Coverage/timeliness: all entries for the class, all (I am pretty sure) were posted on time:

Testing Trackback-my very first blog entry

Accidents-crticism of accident reporting

Chapter 3-5...guilty as charged-basically self-criticism

A Purpose-why we should bother to report crime (it's not for entertainment value)

Purgatory and Cocaine Underwear-my favorite entry, or at least favorite title

Just what I was thinking-satire: based on many people's opinions of the news

 

Depth:(my longest and most crtical blog,..it'd have to be interesting with a title like that)

Purgatory and Cocaine underwear

 

Interaction (they caused a reaction)

Purgatory and Cocaine Underwear

A Purpose

Accidents

 

Comments ( on other people's interesting and varying takes on the same subjects)

Vanessa:

Less Than Serious Crime Stories

How not to be "that' reporter

I'm sorry...

 

Madelyn

Chaos in England

Other Accident Story

 

Jacquelyn

Harsh realities of crime reporting

 


 

There's a Fine, Fine Line

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"and yet as came the madness, so came the words" page 159 The Professor and the Madman

 

Just as the reader begins to be baffled by the man’s staggering intellect, he is reminded of Minor’s lunacy, most notably during the parts where Minor cuts off his penis and when he yells that men are “trying to make a pimp out of me” ( Winchester 159). The fine line between genius and madness was effectively illustrated. The intensive background of Dr Minor needed to be given in order to understand and sympathize with his lunacy. All in all, I believe The Professor and the Madman had the potential to be more captivating than it actually was. I felt it somewhat of a letdown. At times, I felt the book droned on and on, especially during the parts when Minor’s work on the slips was discussed. Upon finishing the book, I felt sort of a melancholy feeling. Usually, upon finishing a new book, I find myself pondering the ending and the characters for some time after. However, upon finishing this particular book, I felt relief that it was done. I did not find myself attached to Dr. Minor as I have found myself attached to Severus Snape, Inspector Javert, or Mia Thermopolis.

Just what I was thinking............

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The two video clips shown in class may have been lampoons of tv news, but they did contain kernels of what many of us may think. In discussion, the Wolf Blitzer clip. Seriously, there are more important things going on in the world where Anna Nicole's body was going to be buried. We have a major war going on! There is an AIDS crisis in Africa! Yet people still care more about what stupid thing Brittany Spears is going to do next, or when Nicole Richie and Joel Madden will get married. We have to face a fact: many people just get their news from the tv. TV ratings make the wolrd go 'round. Nicole and Brittany are more interesting than a war report, which is more newsworthy. Now if only the newscasters could find a creative way to make war interesting? How sad is it that I have to even pose that question?

The First of Many

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I did not expect to have reveleations about the novels we read for class. But through writing my thoughts on just one quote and commenting on others' blogs. I managed to have several epiphanies. Two in particular, one on Hamlet's "to be or not to be" sololoquy and the other on Harry Potter while commenting on Jen's recent blog, I believe have the potentail to be future subjects for a thesis.

Analyzing brings about new ideas when you are not expecting them. This is what I have learned from this class thusfar.

 my first portfolio

Coverage: (every blog for El 237)

There's a Fine Fine Line

Call Me Crazy

Booo, I'm a ghost....and I may or may not be lying

Dumb and Dumberer: When Rozy Met Guildy

Purposely Clueless

Becoming Jane

Give Harry a Break

 Don't "caste" aside love

 

Timeliness (all entries on time)

Call Me Crazy

Booo, I'm a ghost..and I may or may not be lying

Dumb and Dumberer: Whe Rozy Met Guildy

Purposely Clueless

Becoming Jane

Give Harry a Break

 

Depth

Booo, I'm a ghost..and I may or may not be lying-this blog just lead me to another, then another revelation in Hamlet

Purposely Clueless- I really did not understand the point of Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead until I thought about it afterwards. Through this blog, I discovered that the story was not as pointless as it seemed

Becoming Jane-a personally connection. Jane Eyre hits me hard. I was subservient and barely spoke when i was a child, just like Jane, for the same reasons she withdrew. Literature was salvation for Jane and I.

Give Harry A Break- a subject I was waiting patiently to be discussed. I could write a 16 page paper on the literary merit of Harry Potter.

 

Interaction:

  comment on Jen's blog on Roberts Chapter Ch. 5 and 6 :Hamlet-"To be or Not to Be..."

  comment on Diane's blog on Roberts 5 and 6: Hamlet-"Claudius, king of the backbone? not so much...."

  comment on Kevin's blog on Jane Eyre: chapters 1-16-"Must Keep in Good Health'

 

Discussion: these are the two that caused my revelations

Booo, I'm a ghost...and I may or may not be lying-examining the first few events in Hamlet lead me to believe that Hamlet was not crazy, just scared and a little mad with grief.

Give Harry a break-Actually, Dr Jerz commented while we were reading Hamlet about Harry Potter not being classic literature. I walked out of the class that day quite perterbed that he was knocking Harry. This was my chance to defend Harry's literary merit.

 

Blog Carnival Entry

Give Harry a Break

 

Xenoblogging

Since Jen has not yet approved my commet, I shall just have to write about her blog: Which is Which?-this is my favorite comment, since I had a big Harry Potter revelation that was totally unexpected.

I had the following revelation while commenting on her blog:

this is my comment:

 

 " actually wrote my blog on the same subject as your last paragraph. Who is not to say that our children and grandchildren will be studying Harry Potter in high school and college?

Time will tell. Books need to be analyzed over and over again. The argument over whether Hamlet is sane or insane did not stem from just one reading. Conflicting views lead to different interpretations, which lead to further research and study.

As for Harry Potter, it can be used as a useful learning tool. Think about it: Voldemort believes in the advancement of the pureblood (he himself is a half-blood), not wanting them to mix with half our mud-bloods. He brainwashes the purebloods into believing lies about the other races, such as they must have stolen their magic since it cannot have been in their blood. He uses the purebloods to exterminate the other races.

What other radical leader did basically the same things?

Hitler.

Harry Potter is a commentary on the Holocaust, disguised as a fantasy novel."

I do not know if anyone has ever explored the parallels between Harry Potter and the holocaust. If not, I would like to be the first.

Wildcard:

Purgatory and Cocaine Underwear-I think this blog, while from my other class with you, demonstrates my ability to analyze material and applying what I learned in class to a reading

Dont "caste" aside love

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"He is not of your order: keep to your caste, and be too self-respecting to lavish the love of the whole heart, soul, and strength, where such a gift is not wanted and would be despised" -Jane to herself

Jane Eyre

 

For such a headstrong woman, Jane sure is self-depricating.She doesn't think herself a pretty woman; whatever notions she may have had about herself being decent looking were dissolved by her stay at Lowood. No one has ever loved her: maybe Jane feels she is not worthy of being loved. She trys to stop herself from having these feelings for Mr. Rochester to avoid the pain of being rejected. Plus, even if she were to admit she loved him, there could never be a romance between the two. He is of noble birth and she a poor governess. someone like Mr Rochester could never love someone like Jane. They are from two different worlds. Society wouldn't allow it. But you cannot help who you love. Love is blind.

Give Harry a Break....

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Academic writing is studied because society hopes to learn something from it. Academic writing often proposes new ideas and gives social commentary in an "obvious manner". But, it is only obvious to academics because it has been studied so many times. Hamlet is considered a classic; there are many essays, commentaries, and books on the themes and social value of Hamlet. But we have also had hundreds of years to study the work and discover the value.

 

That is not, to say, that we could not learn something from say, Harry Potter. But, since that is a piece of what some currently call "popular fiction", the commentary is less obvious because the work is so new and we have to search a little for it. For example, there is a whole underlying theme of racism and class differences in Harry Potter. I believe, then, that popular fiction is used to educate the younger generation. When they grow up and become academics, they will have studied in their youth what is now considered a "classic" and will understand the value of such a work.

 

Harrp Potter may not be considered acmademic writing or classic literature, but we must remember this: what was Dickens and Shakespeare in their time?

 

Popular fiction.

 

Give Harry some time.

Becoming Jane

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"I will never come to see you when I am grown up; and if any one asks me how I liked you, and how you treated me, I will say the very thought of you makes me sick, and that you treated me with miserable cruelty" -Jane to Mrs Reed

Jane Eyre

Amen. AMEN. Jane, I applaude you. This passage hit me, and hit me hard. I have been treated in the past as Jane was. There were a thousand times when I wish I could have said this, so many times when I was thinking exactly what Jane thought. If only I had had the courage to say this to my "Mrs Reed". Mine too, called me a devil child, spreading this to all her friends and anyone who would hear: most of them believed her. Being called wicked (it still continues to this day) when you are really just defending yourself  hurts; it cuts deep. I, like Jane, found solace in my books in my youth. They, along with theater, were an escape from the harsh reality of life. Free from Mrs Reed's evil grasp, Jane finds herself a new person.I know Jane. I am Jane.
.

" Her spirit is in pieces
Her heart has broken at the seams
She craves one drop of kindness
But all she has are shattered dreams
She curses the injustice
And begs to know the reason why
She suffers in this prison
When all she wants to do is fly
Over mountains
Over oceans
How her restlessness stirs
For she longs for her liberty
When will liberty be hers?"

excerpt from "The Orphan"

Jane Eyre: the musical

rock on, Jane.

 

Purposely Clueless

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"Show how actions bring out the idea" page 125, Writing About Literature

I think that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead can be associated with the idea of using people. For most of the play, Ros and Guil do not een know hwere they are, much less why they are there in the first place. It was ingenious of Claudius and Hamlet to choose these clueless but loveable oafs in there schemes: if someone has no idea what is going on, then they certainly cannot object to it, can they?

The first act is almost entirely devoted to the establishment of both Ros and Guil's characters: they are so clueless that they are constantly trying to figure out what is going on. In the process, they managed to miss the big picture. We need to know the nature of the two to understand how they are manipulated and fit in to Hamlet.