Human and Humor

| | Comments (4) | TrackBacks (0)

"But Pop-It's great material. It makes everything more REAL-more human" -pg 23

Facts and figures dehumaize a situation. How many times have we heard that 6 million Jews were killed? We have all seen the pictures, but some of us may have become de-sensatized to them. The same goes for those pictures they show during the Christian Children's Fund: we just turn it off. But a personal, first-hand account of the Holocaust includes all the details the media and history books do not. These people had lives. They had dreams for the future, but they were interrupted by the Third Reich. The victims were just like us, only we have uninterrupted lives. There are many personal accounts available (my favorites are Night and I Have Lived a Thousand Years) Elie's story about the violin and horrifying description of seeing his father die before him, and Livia's account of how she had to save her mother from dying of starvation shock and burn into people's minds forever how horrible an event the Holocaust was in history, much moreso than a statistic or picture could.

I was glad that Spiegelman included humor, leaving in such bits as the arguments between his father and his stepmom, as well as the ones between his father and himself. Such seemingly trivial facts, such as Lucia the crazy girlfriend, remind us all that these are people. There is humor in everything. I shall decline to mention, much to Dr Jerz's dismay (sarcasm), a quote from one of my theater books on humor in tragedy.

I then pose to you a question: Who do you think the pigs represent? Are they the Polish who are kind to/help out the Jews?

0 TrackBacks

Listed below are links to blogs that reference this entry: Human and Humor.

TrackBack URL for this entry: http://blogs.setonhill.edu/mt/mt_tb-awoisdlkfj.cgi/10914

4 Comments

I'm fairly sure that the pigs are Polish, the cats German (Nazis), and the mice Jewish. Kind of an interesting take on nationality don't you think? He seems to be agreeing the Jews held there own nationality - that was a Nazi claim too . . .

Anyway - I think that the humor in Maus works better then the imagery in Night (I haven't read I Have Lived A Thousand Years). Partically I think it works better because, as you put it, you can see the interruptions taking place (oh graphic novels).

Each race= Each animal.

Each animal choice reflect differences that they saw in the themselves and each other. That of course was the basis of this tragedy: being afraid of differences.

Each race= Each animal.

Each animal choice reflect differences that they saw in the themselves and each other. That of course was the basis of this tragedy: being afraid of differences.

I agree with Diana. I think it is pretty set that the pigs are Polish. I wouldn't necessarily say that they are all kind enough to help the Jews. Some are, but some are too afraid to help--or they are sticklers for the rules.

Leave a comment


Type the characters you see in the picture above.

Recent Comments

Jennifer Prex on Human and Humor: I agree with Diana. I think it
Kevin "Kelo The Great" Hinton on Human and Humor: Each race= Each animal. Each
Kevin "Kelo The Great" Hinton on Human and Humor: Each race= Each animal. Each
Diana Geleskie on Human and Humor: I'm fairly sure that the pigs
Powered by Movable Type