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September 18, 2005

Jeweller's Shop

Wojtyla, The Jeweller's Shop -- Drama as Literature (EL 250)

"The thing is not to go away, and wander for days, months, even years -- the thing is to return and in the old place to find oneself."

The jeweller's shop is that place. Teresa always returns to the jewelry shop window and sees how her life has changed, from one reflection to the next. It is her time portal to remember things how they used to be, and then see how they've changed. As Anna says, "Love is... a synthesis of two people's existence, which converges as it were at a certain point and makes them into one." For Teresa, that certain point can forever be redeemed by standing in front of the jeweller's shop. As comforting a place it can be, it's decline into closure is representative of her love life. The less emotion she has about love, the less sparkle is seen in the jeweller's eyes.
She externalizes "love," only seeing how, "Monica and Christopher...reflect in some way the absolute Existence and Love." I think it's interesting that Wojtyla chooses to capitalize words like Love and Existence. In doing so she makes them into more of an ideal, instead of just human emotion-- something people should strive for.
Rachel found herself really touched by some of the quotes on love and relationships and I agree with her. After all, "Man's eternity passes through it."
I also liked the layout of the play. giving characters individual monologues instead of just short lines made the play more meaningful. It gave the characters depth and showed their introspective side.

Posted by DavidDenninger at September 18, 2005 11:42 AM

Comments

I agree with you about the layout of the play. I like when characters have monlogues too, because you're right, it does show more depth. Not only that, but the other characters don't get a chance to interrupt or give their input like they would if they were having a conversation. So basically, we get to hear everything that the character has to say without their opinions or feelings being shut down by another character.

Posted by: Chera Pupi at September 18, 2005 12:30 PM

Ummm, David? Karol Wojtyla is not a girl. It is Pope John Paul II.

Posted by: Lorin Schumacher at September 18, 2005 12:40 PM

LOL...oh.

Posted by: David Denniner at September 18, 2005 03:26 PM

You SPED.

haha just kidding.

Posted by: Amanda at September 18, 2005 05:35 PM

I agree with you about how the play was set up. The audience gets to read exactly what a character is thinking without having the other characters get offended or anything. I also like how we kind of got like both sides of a situation, for example, when Teresa and Andrew just got engaged.

Posted by: Amanda at September 18, 2005 05:39 PM

David!! i just commented about how i loved the way the author or Pope shall i say, let the characters have monologues instead of short get to the point lines.

Posted by: Denamarie at September 18, 2005 08:18 PM

David,

It is interesting that you loved these long monologues....I would rather the characters race to the point - but then again, I am usually super busy and racing myself.

Do you think the Pope did it to fit the time period it was written in, on top of making it super introspective?

Posted by: Katie Aikins at September 18, 2005 08:42 PM

I like how the couples went back and forth and gave their point-of-view of the events that were discussed.

"TERESA. ...after a while I asked him if he believed in signals.

ANDREW. Teresa asked me today:
Andrew, do you believe in signals?"

Posted by: Kayla Sawyer at September 18, 2005 10:29 PM

Kayla, I really liked how where one left off the other would pick up and then tell their side of the same story too. And I think this is one of the most romantic plays I have ever read. It is so eloquently written and it is so much more realistic than other "love" stories. Why on earth is Romeo and Juliet so famous when this play exists? (Don't get me wrong, Shakespeare was a genius and I love his work, but plot wise, Romeo and Juliet is a terrible love story!)

Posted by: Lorin Schumacher at September 19, 2005 12:40 AM

I agree with you when you said that the author gave the characters depth and showed their introspective side. That is why I think I enjoyed this story so much! I got to know the characters and realted to them! It was a magnificent story!

Posted by: Gina at September 21, 2005 12:04 AM

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