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January 26, 2006

Deal with the fact your BORING

Foster, Bernice Bobs Her Hair

"What a blow it must be when a man with imagination marries the beautiful bundle of clothes that he's been building ideals round, and finds that she's just a weak, whining, cowardly mass of affectations!"

Do you think that Marjorie is being a little to rough on Bernice?!

Just because Marjorie is the life of the party and beautiful does not mean she has the right to make a harsh blow towards her cousin. In the quote above, Marjorie is being very superficial and shallow. If a guy ends up liking her cousin, he should love her for herself, her beauty and personality. If he doesn't love her for who she is, then he is shallow and Bernice shouldn't be with that man in the first place.
I hated the fact that Bernice tried to fit in because that is not who she is.
I think that Marjorie deserved getting her cut in the middle of the night, but I think that none of this would have happened if Bernice just stayed who she was.

Posted by Denamarie at January 26, 2006 01:03 PM

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Comments

Marjorie certainly doesn't come off very well at the end of this story, but is Bernice better off now than she was at the beginning?

Posted by: Dennis G. Jerz at January 26, 2006 03:30 PM

Dena, great point. And in regards to your question Dr. Jerz, I feel the answer is no. To me, I agree with Dena that Bernice was who she was and should have been proud of it. And maybe instead of listening to her cousin to gain self-confidence, if she would have ignored what she heard when she overheard Marjorie and her aunt talking about her, that in itself would have given her self-confidence. So what Bernice has gained at the end of the story is a false self-confidence in which she's just like all of the other girls that were at that party now and she's not different. She's just as bad as Marjorie. (Although I like how Bernice gave Marjorie a wake up call!)

Posted by: Andy LoNigro at January 26, 2006 05:04 PM

NO, I think she was fine in the beginning of the story. Being different is a good thing, it makes you special.
She should of just stayed the way she was.

Posted by: Denamarie Ercolani at January 26, 2006 06:34 PM

I agree! Bernice may have been a little passive and reserved at the beginning of the story, but she was still HERSELF and that's all that matters. I HATE it when girls act fake, and if Bernice wanted to be more outgoing or popular or whatever, I don't think I would pick Marjorie to model off of.

Posted by: AmandaNichols at January 26, 2006 06:39 PM

i agree Denamarie because girls are so easily influenced by what others think and I think its better to get even than get mad. At the same time, I believe self-confidence is important

Posted by: Erin Waite at January 26, 2006 08:18 PM

I don't necessarily think either of these women were looking for love in the first place. In the time period in which this was set, these girls were merely high school socialites. If Marjorie was looking for love, she could have taken Warren. If Bernice wanted love, she could have taken Otis.

Rather, they were concerned about courting a gaggle of gentlemen, and it is at that point that they needed to be out-going and eye-catching in order to accomplish their goals. While I agree with you that it's what's on the inside that counts... they weren't necessarily trying to promote that in this story.

Posted by: Mike Rubino at January 26, 2006 09:18 PM

Mike, Fitzgerald certainly takes in the whole youth scene with a critical eye. He's quite critical of Marjorie, and ambivalent about Bernice.

Otis is a bit young, but the old Bernice would probably have been quite happy with Draycott Deyo -- the young man studying for the ministry.

Posted by: Dennis G. Jerz at January 26, 2006 11:08 PM

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