Jerz: Intro to Literary Study (EL150)


27 January 2006

Narrative Form


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Ex 1-1b: Diagnostic Peer Review (5pts)

Trade copies of Ex 1-1a with two peers. Bring the signed, marked-up copies of your peer essays to class, and also post a thoughtful, constructive critique to the Ex 1-1b slot in J-Web.

Your critique for each peer should include

  1. What you liked about your peer's work (with a quotation)
  2. What you think your peer should cut and
  3. What you think your peer should expand


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Fitzgerald, ''Bernice Bobs Her Hair'' (online)

The full text of this out-of-copyright story by F. Scott Fitzgerald is available online.

About 24 hours before class, post your agenda item (see the FAQ page) on this story. Then, before class today, respond to 2-4 agenda items posted by your peers. During class, I may call on you to lead a brief class discussion based on your weblog, or I might ask you to share the comment you posted on a peer's agenda item.

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RRRR (Read, React, Respond, Reflect)

A four-step process that helps you prepare for a productive class discussion using the SHU weblog system.

We will start out slowly at first, only completing a part of the RRRR process, so that the whole class has the chance to adjust to it. Once we start the full process, for each item or group of items marked as "Text" on the course outline, Read the assignment, react by posting an "agenda item" about 24 hours before the class discussion (see glossary), respond to 2-4 items posted by your peers, and reflect on the experience in a half-page essay (100-200 words -- see "reflection paper" in the glossary).

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Agenda Item

A short homework assignment, comprising a brief quotation from the assigned text,, a non-obvious question or observation, and a contribution to the class discussion (if called on).

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Rhetoric

Rhetoric the use of language to persuade. One of the three most important of the liberal arts (those skills that free citizens were expected to have). Classical rhetoric recognizes three main ways to persuade. When persuading, we can rouse the readers' emotions (pathos), appeal to their sense of justice (ethos), or rely upon logic (logos).

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Foster (19 & 20)


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