American Lit II (EL 267)


26 Jan 2006

Peer Blogging

Recent activity on the blogs of all students in this course. This page will update regularly, though it won't always show the most recent entries. To force an update, post a comment anywhere on this website or the NMJ website.
50 Recent Peer Entries

Trackbacks
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The Adding Machine
Excerpt: Peer Blogging -- Jerz: American Lit II (EL 267)...
Weblog: New Media Journalism @ Seton Hill University
Tracked: February 6, 2006 11:29 PM
Comments

Mending Wall & After Apple Picking
The mending wall poem was on that I felt that the wall was built like we build walls and do not let others in. In Apple Picking I felt that we just like to keep others out and not let them see the real fruit of our lives. Some of our lives are not a clear as a apple on a tree.

Posted by: Lisa Randolph at January 31, 2006 12:22 AM

The World Trade Center
We realize too late when we lose something. Even though not all saw the World trade center a beautiful it still had it's purpose. Now that it is gone the author Lehnmen feels that now it is a missing element and wished that it was still here.

Posted by: Lisa Randolph at January 31, 2006 12:28 AM

On "Deset Places"
He is "included in the Loneliness" the poet is looking at winter as a cold,dark,and dead time of the year. That we may all at one time in our lives feel that we are distant and that life is dark and gray and then life returns and we enjoy the time we have once again.

Posted by: Lisa Randolph at January 31, 2006 12:55 AM

Judith Oster" Desert Places"
"Withdrawing would not be strategic" and "self-perserving. Meaning that withdrawing physically,emontionally and mentally from life is not a good idea. But that life has meaning and that it is worth living. That we are to be attentive to our surrounding and to make logical decisions in life.

Posted by: Lisa Randolph at January 31, 2006 01:00 AM

The World Trade Center:
To me this poem is stressing the symbolic and nobelistic meaning to the world. The author does not spill his tears to us, but we are still able to tell that he respects the twin towers now after what happened.

Posted by: Sarah Lodzsun at January 31, 2006 09:09 PM

The 1st sentence was SUPPOSED to say "To me this poem is stressing the symbolic and nobelistic meaning that the twin towers meant to the world". Sorry for the mistake!

Posted by: Sarah Lodzsun at January 31, 2006 09:12 PM

After reading the play I feel that the police are blaming Mrs. Wright of killing her husband when in fact he committed suicide. For the mere fact that he had a rope around his neck and she (Mrs.Wright) is a sound sleeper.

Posted by: Lisa Randolph at February 1, 2006 11:20 AM

Lisa and Sarah, it's great to see you've started tackling the readings we're discussing this term.

But this particular page is going to get very long if you keep posting your comments here.

It will be much easier for your peers (and me) to follow your points and have conversations with you if you post in a new entry on your own blog. An online version of the instructions I handed out the other day is available here

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/nmj/tutorial/blogging.htm

You might also leave comments on the course web page devoted to each particular reading. For instance, students have already started commenting on the Roberts close reading chapter:

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/DennisJerz/EL267/014184.php

We'll get the hang of blogging soon. I wouldn't spend so much time on it if I didn't really think it's a useful tool for enhancing in-class discussion and reinforcing good strategies for writing skills.

I'm planning to spend part of next class period going over the procedure for using MT Quickpost (which will simultaneously create a new entry on your own blog and leave a note on the course website telling your peers how to find your work), but for the record those instructions are here

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/nmj/tutorial/quickpost.htm

Posted by: Dennis G. Jerz at February 1, 2006 11:32 AM
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