November 30, 2004

The Complete Random-ness That Is Me

When it is not necessary to make a decision, it is necessary not to make a decision.
Lord Falkland (1610 - 1643)

I have no idea what the heck this blog entry is about, some if at some point, in the middle or something, you figure it out, please do let me know. Now on to the main event! Erm, me or the lack thereof.
I've got about 16 million things that I should be doing right now. As is obvious, I'm not doing any of them. (Well I lied, blogging is one of those 16 million, but that would be blogging in the academic sense of the word - not dumb posts by silly people trying to avoid what it is they should be doing.)
One of the largest problems I have at the moment is that I am not a poet. I may be taking a class to try and educate myself on the subject, but that does not give me the right to inflict the pain of my poetry on the world. This being said, I am terrified about the poetry reading that I am going to will myself to do well on.

Wow, there was about 8 hours between when I started this blog entry and now, largely because I got up and forgot about my computer. Seeing as it has no point and I have to finish up the homework I didn't do by 11, I'm leaving it at this. Sorry if you actually read this, I hope that in the future you find a better way to waste your time then my pointless blog.

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 5:40 AM | Comments (1)

November 15, 2004

Smoking Sucks

Things are not only what they are. They are, in very important respects, what they seem to be.
Hubert H. Humphrey (1911 - 1978)

After much consideration on the thought, I've decided that smoking is one of the most discusting habits in the world. Here are a few of my reasons for this decision. - None of them have to do with health; I know that smoking isn't healthy and if those who smoke don't they don't have a high enough IQ - the warnings are on the label for goodness sake.

10.) The smell - there is the smell of wood-smoke and then there is smoke-smoke. Smoke-smoke just sucks. Its the kind that makes you want to go get fresh air.

9.) That smell clings to you. If you are around a smoker, you are going to smell like smoke. It stays in your hair, your clothes, your skin.

8.) The cost. It is way to expensive to smoke. Wouldn't it be better to have all that money go towards a vacation or something?

7.) What it does to your car windows. If you smoke in your car, it takes forever for your wind-shield to de-frost. Say hello to always fogy windows too.

6.) Ashtrays. I'm sorry but an ashtray in use is the ugliest household trinket ever. I want my house to look nice thank you.

5.) Cigarettes on the ground. It is gross to be walking on cigarette buts and they don't improve the landscape around them.

4.) Limited hand use. While smoking you only have one free hand - normally I can't make do with two.

3.) The need for a lighter. Its just one more thing that you have to remember in the morning.

2.) Being outside during cold weather. Most workplaces don't have a smoking room - when it is below freezing, I'd rather stay inside.

1.) Kissability! No matter what kind of toothpaste is used, something about the smoke clings to your teeth, gums, and tounge - I rather not have that shit in my mouth!

Yeah I know this was a random anti-smoking bit, but I was just so grossed out watching I don't know how many people throw cigarettes out their car windows this weekend.

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 8:14 AM | Comments (0)

November 8, 2004

Mr. Richard Corey

The ready availability of suicide, like sex and alcohol, is one of life's basic consolations.
Edward Abbey (1927-1989)

It may seem weird, but I think that one of the reasons that suicidal people are able to keep going is because they breath a sigh of relief knowing soon they won't have to. At least this theory holds up in the Edwin Robinson's poem, "Richard Corey."
Just look at how liked the man is, "he glittered when he walked. / And he was rich-yes, richer than a king" (that last bit is about the money, not the fame, but still, trust me as a poor college student - money matters.) Well, since Richard Corey went home and shot himself, it is obvious that all that jazz didn't hold the card he felt he needed to suceed in life.
Richard Corey manages to keep on going through it all - until, "one calm summer night, / Went home and put a bullet through his head." The entire poem works to set Richard Corey up as a man that everyone wants to be - then he kills himself. Did Richard Corey put a stop to other people wanting to be exactly as he was by ending so violently? No.
Maybe Richard Corey went the way of Hemingway. His theory in life was that once people stop being useful, they should die - not wither into old age. So he, like Richard Corey killed himself. Is that the way we should all go? I wonder if that is what Edwin Robinson was trying to get at.

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 2:43 PM | Comments (11)

November 7, 2004

Yellow Wallpaper

I became insane with long intervals of horrible sanity.
Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849)

After reading this story for the first time this past spring, I was convinced that the narrator killed herself. After reading this story a second time, I still hold that opinion.
Without a doubt, there are several different ways to look at this story. I however, want to look at the story in connection with the behavior typical of suicidal cases. (Makes sense doesn't it, because I do think she committed suicide, how else am I going to present my point?)
Suicide, as any expert will tell you, has warning signs. Such signs would not be possible if there isn't a similar connection between the behaviors of suicide cases. The warning signs for suicide, according to Befrienders.org, are as follows:
1.) Becoming depressed or withdrawn
2.) Behaving recklessly
3.) Getting affairs in order and giving away valued possessions
4.) Showing a marked change in behavior, attitudes or appearance
5.) Abusing drugs or alcohol
6.) Suffering a major loss or life change
Maybe I am alone in this, but I think that the narrator in The Yellow Wallpaper shows the majority of these. The reason she is in the wallpapered room to begin with is because of her depression. Her reckless behavior comes in the form of the woman behind the wallpaper. As the story continues her attitudes towards John and his sister change. She doesn't want them to figure out the 'secret' of the wallpaper. Finally, her major life change is not being allowed to write, though she does in secret anyway. That leaves only two warning signs not accounted for.
I have heard various reasons both for and against her suicide. I am for it, because I think that even if she hasn't by the end of the story, she will because of the lack of resolution concerning the warning signs she exhibits.

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 4:52 PM | Comments (10)

November 1, 2004

I've Been Workin' On The Railroad . . .

I've been workin' on the railroad,
All the live long day
I've been workin' on the railroad,
Just to pass the time away
Can't you hear the whistle blowing?
Rise up so early in the morn
Can't you hear the captain shouting?
Dinah, blow your horn?

Dinah, won't you blow,
Dinah, won't you blow,
Dinah, won't you blow your horn?
Dinah, won't you blow
Dinah, won't you blow
Dinah, won't you blow your horn?

I've been workin' on the railroad,
All the live long day
I've been workin' on the railroad,
Just to pass the time away
Can't you hear the whistle blowing?
Rise up so early in the morn
Can't you hear the captain shouting?
Dinah, blow your horn?

Dinah, won't you blow,
Dinah, won't you blow,
Dinah, won't you blow your horn?
Dinah, won't you blow
Dinah, won't you blow
Dinah, won't you blow your horn?

Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah
Someone's in the kitchen, I know
Someone's in the kitchen with Dinah
Strumming on the old banjo

Fee, fie, fiddle-i-o
Fee, fie, fiddle-i-o-o-o
Fee, fie, fiddle-i-o
Strumming on the old banjo

John Henry. He was working on the railroad. Well, I take that back, maybe he wasn't. Heck, how could he be if he wasn't real?
Here is what I have to say on wheather or not John Henry was real, who cares??? The songs that came about because of his legend do not depend on his actual life, or lack there of. Dinah's explots in the kitchen don't really matter either, true, they are mentioned in the song; but it is the song, that really matters.
The thing that interested me in these songs was the differences in the lyrics between the different groups singing them. Yes, I know that it makes sense that there are differences between a paid construction crew and a group of prisioners doing time (for example) singing about the same thing. What I think is cool is the small differences that are there and why.
In the prison and chain gang versions of John Henry, there is far more about his wife being loyal to him and how important that is. Also, the color of her dress is red. I mention that because in the construction crew version, her dress is blue. I am not in the fashion business nor claim to be a fashion expert, but different color dresses means more then just wearing different color shoes.
According to Desktop Publishing, the color red is "a strong color that conjures up a range of seemingly conflicting emotions from passionate love to violence and warfare." The color blue on the other hand is "calming. It can be strong and steadfast or light and friendly. Almost everyone likes some shade of blue." I might be the only one, but I think even looking more closely at that small detail shows a huge difference between the two groups.
I think that more important then if the subject matter, John Henry, was real or not is how the people who sang about him went about doing so.

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 4:42 PM | Comments (2)