May 9, 2007

You Put Your Blog Entry In . . .

You put your blog entry in,
You take your blog entry out,
You put your blog entry in and you shake it all about!
You do the blog portfolio and you turn yourself around,
That's what it's all about!

Variation on the "Hooky Poky"

I'm excited to say I've done it; I've made it through another semester and I have the summer to be looking forward to. But first, a small recognition of a small portion of the work I've done, childhood sing-song style.

Ring-Around-The-King-Lear:

Ring around the King Lear,
Pockets full of criticism,
Acts! Acts!
We all can critique!

Pop Goes The Ender:

All around the bugger bush,
The military chased the Ender,
The military thought it was all for fun,
Pop goes the Ender!

The W;t On The Bus:

The W;t on the bus goes round and round,
round and round,
round and round,
The W;t on the bus goes round and round,
all through the blogs!

The Jenna on the bus goes Jason, Vivian, Susie,
Jason, Vivian, Susie,
Jason, Vivian, Susie,
Jason, Vivian, Susie,
The Jenna on the bus goes Jason, Vivian, Susie,
all through the blogs!

The MacKenzie on the bus goes dark twisted humor,
dark twisted humor,
dark twisted humor,
dark twisted humor,
The MacKenzie on the bus goes dark twisted humor,
all through the blogs!

The Kayla on the bus goes emotional book and movie,
emotional book and movie,
emotional book and movie,
emotional book and movie,
The Kayla on the bus goes emotional book and movie,
all through the blogs!

The W;t on the bus goes round and round,
round and round,
round and round,
The W;t on the bus goes round and round,
all through the blogs!


Well, I hoped you liked my rather unusual approach to the blogging portfolio - until next time, enjoy singing along!

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 7:57 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Backwards Religion = Insanity?

Perhaps the Elizabethan audience would have constructed Lear's insanity as a religious regression.

Joy Kennedy "Shakespeare's King Lear"

Religion has always been a sensitive subject - to put it mildly. Religious persecution, or, for that matter, almost all persecution, comes from a lack of understanding about the traditional mannerisms of behavior.

Unrecognizable behavior to an unprepared mind does strike a note of insanity.

Just think about it. That person spinning on the elevator for their class project attracts attention. That is the entire point of the experiment! When something doesn't fit, it stands out.

So yes, by putting on the vestments of a pagan religion - the insanity of King Lear seems more complete. I just don't see it as religious regression.

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 7:47 PM | Comments (0)

The Next Generation - and I Don't Mean Star Trek

Lear's great age is [emphasized] from the beginning; Gloucester is the father of both Edmund and Edgar; and Kent, though young by modern standards (he is 48), is presented as a man in the twilight of his years. Edmund, Goneril, and Regan are their children. Lear, then, and those around him, are a representation of the traditional, feudal order; while Edmund, supremely, and those around him are a representation of the current generation in the process of replacing them.

William Zunder "Shakespeare and the End of Feudalism: King Lear as Fin-De-Siècle Text"

The feudalist system of government consisted of a hierarchy in which a ruling land owner offered mounted fighters a fief - a unit of their land to control and cultivate - in exchange for military service. The individual who accepted this land became a vassal, and the man who granted the land become known as his liege or his lord.

Apparently, as William Zunder puts it, King Lear kind of blows that system out of the water. The old way of life dies just like the elder characters of the play. How's that for service?

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 7:33 PM | Comments (0)

Universal Language

"That's where we make our mistake," he said, "-letting all them people onto English. There'd be a heap less trouble if everybody only knew his own language."

Flannery O'Connor "The Displaced Person"

English is the language of business, similar to the way French was formally. (Go Napoleon!) A universally understood language has been considered good business practice for, well, a long time. I guess Mr. Shortley doesn't agree - at least in terms of English.

In 1887, Esperanto was introduced by Dr. L.L. Zamenhof. Esperanto is an international language intended for the purpose of universal understanding. (How well that is working out for everyone is debatable. I don't know Esperanto - I've never had the opportunity to learn Esperanto - so how universal is that?)

This entire concept is what Mr. Shortley is arguing against and he wouldn't have even had to learn a new language! I'm not going to argue for or against Mr. Shortley. I guess I just don't see a point in doing so. I will say however that ignorance is bliss - and that includes understanding the words going on around you. If you don't understand, the words have no power over you. Without understanding however, you have no power over those words.

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 2:17 PM | Comments (1)

May 8, 2007

History and Tragedy and Conflated Text - Oh My!

FIRST GENTLEMAN: Contending with the fretful element; Bids the wind blow the earth into the sea Or swell the curled waters 'bove the main, That things might change or cease; tears his white hair, Which the impetuous blasts, with eyeless rage, Catch in their fury and make nothing of; Strives in his little world of man to outstorm The to-and-fro-conflicting wind and rain. This night, wherein the cub-drawn bear would couch, The lion and the belly-pinched wolf Keep their fur dry, unbonneted he runs, And bids what will take all.

William Shakespeare The History of King Lear Scene 8

FIRST GENTLEMAN: Contending with the fretful element; Bids the wind blow the earth into the sea Or swell the curled waters 'bove the main, That things might change or cease.

William Shakespeare The Tragedy of King Lear Act 3 Scene 1

GENTLEMAN: Contending with the fretful elements; Bids the wind blow the earth into the sea Or swell the curled waters 'bove the main, That things might change or cease; tears his white hair, Which the impetuous blasts, with eyeless rage, Catch in their fury and make nothing of; Strives in his little world of man to out-scorn The to-and-fro-conflicting wind and rain. This night, wherein the cub-drawn bear would couch, The lion and the belly-pinched wolf Keep their fur dry, unbonneted he runs, And bids what will take all.

William Shakespeare King Lear (Conflated Text) Act 3 Scene 1

I may not be a literary expert - oh wait, that is the problem. My own personal 'Book of Sand,' The Norton Shakespeare, contains these three different versions of King Lear.

Apparently the text of King Lear has been repeatedly gone over and refuted. So while I can quote Shakespeare for all three of the above texts - I have no idea which is actually the correct one.

I'm beginning to understand why people dedicate their lives to things like comma placement in an old manuscript . . .

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 4:21 PM | Comments (0)

Sibling Rivalry Works, Doesn't It?

CORDELIA: Unhappy that I am, I cannot heave
My heart into my mouth. I love your majesty
According to my bond, no more nor less.

William Shakespeare The Tragedy of King Lear

Three sisters don't always work well together. I, for example, have four sisters - five sisters don't always work well either.

The sibling rivalry at the start of King Lear takes all the old games and creates a new highpoint.

The old game: finding the best way to get money out of Daddy. (For those of you with siblings out there reading this, don't deny it, it happens.)

The new highpoint: getting the biggest rival kicked out of the game.

Tactically speaking, Cordelia messed up when it came to the sibling game. Yes, this may be slightly insensitive to the honest sister of the three, but lets face it - she could have saved herself a whole lot of trouble if she had just satisfied her father's whims.

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 4:06 PM | Comments (0)

The Name Game

So they boarded a starship and went from world to world. Wherever they stopped, he was always Andrew Wiggin, itinerant speaker for the dead, and she was always Valentine, historian errant, writing down the stories of the living while Ender spoke the stories of the dead.

Orson Scott Card Ender's Game

I found it interesting that Ender stopped going by his childhood nickname at the novel's close. Yes, Ender did grow up and left childhood, but his nickname was given to him by Valentine - the one strong relationship he maintained after conquering the buggers.

Names have power. Nicknames have even more power - because it is power in the hands of the named rather than the namer. Names are given, nicknames are nurtured. The named, once named, must keep that name - for it is the foundation of their identity. But a nickname can be thrown off. A nickname the named can choose not to maintain, as Ender did at the end of the novel.

Looking back on it, it makes sense. Valentine (the namer) had manipulative power over Ender (the named) throughout the entire novel. They say that naming something gives you power over it. No, Valentine's power was not a result of her nicknaming Ender, but it is a symbol of that power.

At the end of the novel, Ender returned to his real name, Andrew. Not only was he beyond Valentine's control at that point, he was pushing himself away from it. So Andrew became Ender under Valentine's influence. Once that influence was gone, Ender was free to become Andrew.

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 3:50 PM | Comments (0)

May 7, 2007

Allow Myself to Quote - Myself (Or Rather, My Term Project Partner)

The study of Disney’s Sleeping Beauty examines the movie in terms of three key literary areas of study- historicism, formalism, and the literary canon. Each can be applied in Disney’s Sleeping Beauty in order to find meaning behind various elements of the movie.
Vanessa Kolberg - Walt Disney's Sleeping Beauty: A Literary Approach

Vanessa and I spent an amazing amount of time together in the 3rd Admin computer lab composing what was to become our term project. We chose to analyze our favorite Disney movie, Sleeping Beauty.
For those of you out there who savor the classic Disney movies of your childhood, this is the website for you. For those of you out there who don't really have an interest in Disney and think they merely steal their stories from other places, you're welcome too. Oh and if you are curious as to what that website is (and you should be) it's "Walt Disney's Sleeping Beauty: A Literary Critique."

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 4:37 PM | Comments (0)

The Ends Justify the Means: Isolation Treatment

I told you. His isolation can't be broken. He can never come to believe that anybody will ever help him out, ever. If he once thinks there's an easy way out, he's wrecked.

Orson Scott Card - Ender's Game

Isolation punishment is saved for criminals that have overstepped prison boundaries or are hazardous to the other inmates. Ender's isolation doesn't fit into that mold.

The Ender of Ender's Game endures isolation treatment for reasons that are selfish on the part of those who wish to control him. Ethically, Ender should not be forced into isolation through skillful manipulation. Practically, at least from the point of view of those isolating Ender, isolation is the means that are going to be justified by the ending result.

Now I don't want to sound unethical, but Niccolò Machiavelli is right, at least to a certain extent. The ends do justify the means - for after all, all's well that ends well. Ender is a young child being manipulated through his perpetual isolation.

Ender is not the only child to ever be manipulated by an adult. I don't want to sound like a child abuser, because I'm not - nor do I support such activities, but is Ender's isolation that much worse than the manipulation he would be enduring if left to lead a normal childhood? Children are mislead and manipulated endlessly - Ender is a child receiving the same treatment in a new environment.

Before I get ahead of myself, yes, the manipulation that Ender endures is disproportionately high. The point I'm trying to make is that, despite his isolation, he isn't alone.

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 4:34 PM | Comments (0)

The Beauty of an Educated Exchange

VIVIAN: (To the audience) That was a witty little exchange, I must admit. It showed the mental acuity I would praise in a poetic text. But I admired only the studied application of wit, not its spontaneous eruption.
Margaret Edson W;t

There are several "witty little exchanges" that take place within the bounds of W;t. The one I liked best however, was the title, W;t. Not wit, but w;t.

I'm in favor of creative titles (I try to come up with my own - sometimes greeted with mild success, sometimes overlooked in favor of the more established authors.) Margaret Edson's choice inspired me. I'm not sure what in inspired me to do, but it inspired me nonetheless. The gimmick of semicolon in place of the letter i is an important aspect of the play's nature.

Vivian refers to the wit of the poetry that she analyzes; Edson refers to the wit of the play she has written. All this is done through the use of a single semicolon. That semicolon shows just how important punctuation is for the establishment of wit. (Truss would be proud.)

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 4:12 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack

May 3, 2007

The Wonders and Glory That Make Erin Waite!

Erin is falling into the gaps in my paper and happy to fill them with glitter and cheer!
Erin Waite May 3, 2007

It is now 7:17 pm Eastern Standard Time and the girls have hit the computer lab. After a grueling half hour realization that my paper wasn't organized in any type of linear fashion, Erin Waite came along. This poor girl had the painful job of looking over my draft on the empowerment of the female replicants in Blade Runner.

I had half attempted to say which paragraph ought to be moved before handing my paper over, but it was in vain. Erin was struck by my sidebar notes of "move" (underlined, of course), "BIG GAP HERE, BUT I'M MOVING ON!," and "put stuff here?" Luckily she managed to assemble the troops with cute notes back to me such as: "insert this here." Not exactly what you would call a romantic nature for a note, but altogether more helpful.

Posted by Diana Geleskie at 7:13 PM | Comments (0) | TrackBack