November 2009 Archives

Yea, I Get It

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"Marley was dead: to begin with.  There is no doubt whatever about that."

And then:

"There is no doubt that Marley was dead."

Ok, so is Marley dead or not, because I don't know if I'm getting it?

Other than the fact that I am told repeatedly that Marley is dead, I like the way "A Christmas Carol," by Charles Dickens is written.  I have always seen the movie, and I have not ever read the book.  I have also seen the newest version with Jim Carrey playing Ebenezer Scrooge, so while reading this story I can just picture him, and it is awesome.

When comparing the movie and the book, I can see the details that have been added to the movie.  In the movie, Bob Cratchit and Scrooge are working in his office.  It happens to be extremely cold, and Scrooge does not allow Cratchit to put any coal on the fire.  In fact, he has the coal locked in the box.  In the book, it is said that, "External heat and cold had little influence on Scrooge."  Both of these depictions show just how terrible of a person Scrooge is.  The movie and the book both do this effectively.

EL 237

So, What am I Supposed to Do?

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It's actually really coincidental that we were asked to read and blog about The Decline of the English Department because I just recently had an in depth conversation, yes with myself, about what would happen if they cut the English program at Seton Hill.  Once I really got to thinking about it, I realized I would have to transfer.  I came to school wanting to be an English teacher, and I was guaranteed a degree if I worked hard for it.  I didn't choose English because it was easy because all of us English majors sure know that it's not, I picked it because of its versatility.  Yes, I can become a teacher, but I can also do other things. 

So, if Seton Hill takes the English program away, I will have to say goodbye to all my friends that I have made and the other English students because I've come this far and I'm not stopping now.  Bring on the papers.

EL 237

BOOOOORRRRIING

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The Cavalier Daily was much less exciting than The Harvard Crimson. I found that the larger pictures made it slightly more appealing, but I think that the pictures were compensating for the fact that the web page actually did not have that many stories.  The Harvard Crimson seemed to have more stories to choose from.

Also, The Harvard Crimson was more colorful and it made it look more professional.  I think that society looks for professionalism, and if a site looks bland and boring, then they're probably not going to look into it anymore.  They will also not return to that site, or reccommend it to anyone.

EL 227

Let Me Make a Comment

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Considering that red is my favorite color, I really enjoyed the layout of The Harvard Crimson.  I also enjoyed that i had so many options to choose from.  I liked that it didn't have the normal layout of a newspaper.  This way I can skip the "boring" things and go straight to the stories that I would enjoy.  Technically I could do the same thing in a newspaper, but it takes more time to find out what page each story is on and I also would have to flip through the pages.  On this site, I just have to hope that the internet is going fast.

I clicked on the link that was titled "Today in Photos."  I found this interesting because the photo was given a caption, and it was big enough for me to actually see.  Some pictures in the newspaper are too small.  It was also useful because I could click on a certain photo and leave a comment if I wanted to. 

EL 227

Poetry is Expressive

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So, what is poetry without sound, rhythm, and rhyme?  The title of Chapter 13 in "Writing about Literature," by Edgar V. Roberts, is "Writing about Prosody Sound, Rhythm, and Rhyme in Poetry.

When thinking about poetry, one typically associates it with rhymes.  In reality, a poem can survive without rhymes, but can it survive without sound, ryhthm, and ryhme?  The answer should be no, but I'm sure there's someone out there that could prove otherwise.  However, for the purpose of this chapter let's just stay normal. 

Roberts says that, "the study of prosody determines how poets control their words so that the sound of a poem complements its expression of emotion and ideas" (182).  So, poetry must have either sound, rhytm, or rhyme in order for the poem to express meaning.  Otherwise, it would just sound like a typical story.  Now that's no fun.

EL 237

I'm Dirty

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In this little interactive and fun presentation, I obviously followed the garbage.

I think that a website like this is extremely informative and useful.  It can be used by people my age as well as younger children.  The children may not understand the stats as well, but they would be able to click on certain links and it would still be of some sort of educational value.

Trash and recycling is an extremely important issue presently in the world.  Interactive websites like this can help to inform people on how unfortunate this issue is. 

El 227

Let's Get Wired

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The fuction a link performs in the body of a news article is to inform the reader on the bigger issues that the article is not discussing.  A link can provide extra information that an article does not have space for.

I think that this is important because if a reader is interested in the subject, then they will want to know more about it.  Also, if the journalist is able to provide extra information for the reader's interests, then the reader will want to refer to that journalist more often.  It also makes the journalist appear resourceful.  By linking to your article, it can also help to keep you informed on the subject that you are writing about.

EL 227

Link This

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A Snapshot of Annual High-Risk College Drinking Consequences-a list of statistics that shows the risks of drinking in college.

Changing the Culture of College Drinking-an article that discusses the benefits of a dry campus.

Opinions on the Dry Campus Policy-a link to a youtube video that shows student's views on the concept of a dry campus.

EL 227

Finding What is Lost

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When looking through The New York Times website, I found a video titled A Deck of Lives.  This video showed how South Carolina was using playing cards to help solve unsolved crimes.  The cards were made with the faces of those who have are missing or who have been murdered and the killer or killers were not ever found.  The decks were then sold to prison inmates.  The makers of the cards think that the inmates will recognize the pictures and come forward with information.

The video was very effective because it was able to show how much the inmates actually use the cards.  Also, in a normal newspaper, they would only be able to use a picture.  The video allows readers/ watchers to see and hear the full effect of the playing cards.

EL 227

How We Protect Ourselves

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"Locks are locked, are doublechecked, sometimes by remote control with beeps," (245)

Colso Whitehead shows how society does not trust one another in part four of "John Henry Days."  What are locks, sunglasses, and mud flaps for? Protection.  Protection from whom?  Members of society have succeeded in showing one another that we don't trust each other.

There are legitimate reasons for this mistrust, but it is slightly sad and annoying that we have to go to certain lengths to protect ourselves from our surrounding community.

Mud flaps and sunglasses, however, are a different story.  Sunglasses protect our eyes from the sun, so why do I see so many people wearing sunglasses at night.  Can protection just become a form of style?  This is slightly upsetting because I know that if wearing a padlock around your neck ever became stylish, I would not do it.  Wait, I think I've already seen a couple people wearing something like this.

Portfolio 3

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Coverage: Here is the third list of blogs that I have posted at this time in the semester.

You Can't Always Get What You Want-This entry discusses the need for an explanation in "Maus," by Art Spiegelman.  Not only the readers are left confused, but also the characters.

Imagery Can be Intense!-Imagery can be very useful as an appeal to readers.  It might even make you hungry.

The Masque of the Swine Flu I Mean the Red Death-A parallel between the Red Death and the swine flu.

How Much More Can We Learn About Setting?-Is setting just getting boring, or are we just getting started?

Being Proud of Something You Actually Worked For-Discussion about an editorial regarding Barack Obama and the Nobel Peace Prize.

That's What Friends are For-This entry discusses a sonnet written by William Shakespeare.  Is he really sharing a private moment with the world?

Appreciate the Finer Things in Life, and No That Does Not Mean Your Diamond Pinky Ring-This blog talks about how John Keats, the author of On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer, shows the ability to appreciate the things that aren't worth an amount of money.

Catching the Swine Flu-Another one of my entries that parallels the swine flu.  However, this entry discusses how metaphors and similes can help readers determine the unknown.

Opposites Attract-This blog shows the relationship between opposites in Miss Brill, by Katherine Mansfield.

It Makes No Difference to Me-In this entry I have attempted to show how Langston Hughes attempts to stay away from stereotypes in all categories.

What, You Can't Take a Joke?-Can you have a close analysis of a laugh?

Rumors Rumors Rumors-This blog entry discusses how rumors can change a story.

Naming Names-Everyone wants to look cool, so why not throw a celebrities name out there to improve your status?

How We Protect Ourselves-Again, looking cool can make people revert to extremes.  This time, however, it involves a padlock and a steel chain.

Depth: The entries in which I feel that I have made valiant effort.

You Can't Always Get What You Want-I believe that this entry has brought forth some major issues in many books.

The Masque of the Swine Flu I Mean the Red Death-I think that I did an excellent job comparing the Red Death to the swine flu. 

That's What Friends are For-This blog is important not only in the text of the sonnet, but for society as a whole.

Opposites Attract-I feel that this blog really focuses on an important aspect of Miss Brill

Naming Names-This shows the importance of looking good in society.

How We Protect Ourselves-I believe that this blog takes a societal trend and explains it.

Interaction:

Mausie Maus-Shellie Polly

Shellie refers to the ending of "Maus," by Art Spiegelman.  Gladys also commented on Shellie's blog to discuss the ending.  We are all in agreement that the ending of the book was a little abrupt, and we would have like him to elaborate a little.

Framed Comic Frames-David Wilbanks

Dave explains that the framing used in "Maus" adds more "human element to the story.  The interaction makes the story more relatable.  I then explained to Dave that I believe this book should be used to teach children about the Holocaust because of Art's use of pictures and frames.

What's the Matter With Vladek?-Gladys Mares

Gladys discusses how she feels bad for Vladek's second wife, Mala.  I agree with her in saying that she should not be treated so unfairly, and that he should actually be able to relate to her better because they have so much in common.

Can You Imagine? Nope-Aja Hannah

Aja tells us about the difficulties of reading something that has footnotes.  She says, "the time it took me to look up each meaning took me out of the poem."  I also lose track of what is going on in the poem when I have to refer to something else just to understand it.  It is frustrating.  Aja was able to point out the problems with this occurence.

Dear Prince Prospero,-Jessica Orlowski

In this letter that Jessica has written for her blog entry, she has voiced her concerns about the stupidity of Prince Prospero in The Masque of the Red Death. 

By doing so, she has brought up a point that I have focused on earlier in my blogging.  I have compared Prospero's attempt to escape the Red Death to society's attempt to avoid the swine flu.  As much as you put yourself above the swine flu, you still have just as much of a chance to get it as those who are not on your "level."

On Setting...-Cody Naylor

Cody discusses how Chapter 6 of "Writing about Literature" was unecessary for the class to read.  I agreed, however, I stated that a little reminder wouldn't hurt.

Woe and Moan-Melissa Schwenk

Melissa points out the uses of "woe" and "moan" in Shakespeare's sonnet "When to the Session of Sweet Silent Thought."  I did not realize this use, and once I realized how he had utilized those words in the sonnet, it changed my perspective of the tone.

Read it Out Loud-Carissa Altizer

Factual vs Flowery-Brooke Kuehn

Brooke states that sometimes it is more effective to cut out flowery word usage (newswriting much).  I, however, am always attempting to add flowery words to my writing so that it seems like I actually know what I am talking about.  In reality, it just seems like I am trying too hard.

Poor Miss Brill-Aja Hannah

Miss Brill is just a little, old, lonely lady.  Aja says that it is wrong for the people to treat her the way that she is being treated.  I believe that Miss Brill represents the older part of society, my grandmother.  Even though my Grandmother was not as "crazy" as Miss Brill, there were some similarities.  Jessie Krehlik also agrees with this.

Always Have a Purpose-Melissa Schwenk

Melissa reminds us that there akways has to be a purpose behind writing.  I agree in saying that there have been multiple times in which i have gone into a research paper without having an actual purpose, and it always turned out to be more difficult.

Definately a Student-David Wilbanks

Dave does a very good job of relating to Langston Hughes without addressing race.  I believe that this makes it easier for society to open up to issues of race.

Beware of Tone-Gladys Mares

REPETITIVENESS!!!

Timeliness:

 You Can't Always Get What You Want-Written October 17, and due October 19.

Imagery Can be Intense-Written October 17, due October 19.

The Masque of the Swine Flu I Mean the Red Death-Written October 21 (before class), due October 21.

How Much More Can We Learn About Setting?-Written October 20, due October 21.

That's What Friends are For-Written October 27, due October 28.

Appreciate the Finer Things in Life, and No That Does Not Mean Your Diamond Pinky Ring-Written October 27, due October 28.

Catching the Swine Flu-Written October 27, due October 28.

Opposites Attract-Written October 30 (before class), due October 30.

How We Protect Ourselves-Written November 10, due November 11.

Discussion:

You Can't Always Get What You Want

Dave finished the song, then agreed with what I had to say.  He is confused as to why Holocaust survivors would commit suicide if they had already been through such a terrible time.

The Masque of the Swine Flu I Mean the Red Death

By linking my blog to Jessica Orlowski's blog, I have introduced her to my take on the Red Death.  She replied by stating that society has a selfish side.  Therefore, Poe may have been referring to that rather than actually discussing running away from disease.

That's What Friends are For

Aja discusses not only my blog when she commented, but also Josie's blog.  She describes how sometimes it's easier to get things out than to hold them in.

 Opposites Attract

Aja agrees with what I have written by stating that there is no middle for Miss Brill, and that it is all opposites.  She then suggests that Miss Brill should buy a ferret or something to keep her company.

It Makes No Difference to Me

In this blog, Aja has disagreed with me and put a different perspective into my take on Langton Hughes' poem.  I believe that Langston Hughes has avoided saying boy because he wanted to be fair to all genders, but Aja has showed me that "boy" was an insult during that time period.

How We Protect Ourselves

People go to great lengths to protect themselves.  In my blog, Jessie Krehlik points out that people can actually be "cold" to one another throughout this "protection."  Aja then shows that even though they have gone to such great lengths, people are still harmed.

Xenoblogging:

The Masque of the Swine Flu I Mean the Red Death I have linked this blog to Jessica Orlowski's blog Dear Prince Prospero,

Wildcard:

I feel that this blog is the most fun and interesting one that I have written at this point in the semester, so check it out :). The Masque of the Swine Flu I Mean the Red Death 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When Equality Becomes More Than an Issue

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"In several cities, older members of minority groups acknowledged that the newspaper -- along with life in general -- had greatly changed for the better from the time of their childhood."

I agree with this quote.  Newspapers and life in general have become more fair and equal.  However, in an attempt to make life equal, society has developed a lot more inequality.  "Best Practices for Newspapers and Journalists," by Robert J. Haiman, discusses how news centers attempt to develop a more diverse working enivonment.  If the management was being unfair to people of certain races by not hiring them, then yes that is a problem.  However, news centers are trying to make it more diverse by hiring people that are NOT white.  So, what happens if a white person is more qualified for a job than the black person, but there is a need for a certain percentage of black people?  This is unfair to the white person because he/she better deserves the position.

I have heard that many colleges today must have a certain percentage of minorites accepted.  In other words, even if a non-minority person has more potential than that minority, they still might not be accepted. 

It is good that people are trying to abolish racism, but by doing things such as this, they are creating an even bigger issue.

EL 227

The "Foundation" of News

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Dr. Jerz states, "Investigative journalism is needed to uncover important stories which people want to hide."

Investigative journalism is extremely important for society.  Society needs to know certain things, and without investigative journalism, it would be extremely difficult for us to uncover those things.

My newswriting class pitched ideas for investigative news stories.  Derek Tickle (click for Derek's rendition of investigative reporting) proposed an idea that involved a cover up of swine flu throughout universities, including Seton Hill.  I had actually written an editorial about this cover up for one of my other classes.  In this editorial, I discussed how important it is for people to know how many cases of swine flu there actually are in certain areas, specifically college campuses. 

Due to the fact that it was an editorial, I did not attempt to uncover anything that the school had been hiding.  However, I went off of what I had heard students and school officials discussing.  Derek has the ability to actually show when and how universities are covering up the swine flu.  This will then allow the society of Seton Hill and other schools to understand the real dangers of the sickness.

Back to class

Portfolio 3

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Coverage and Timeliness: Here is the third list of blogs that I have posted at this time in the semester.  These are also the blogs that I have posted on time and ready for scrutiny, I mean to be looked at.

Editorial Drama-Are editorials credible or just opinionated? This blog discusses the use of editorials in the news.

Just Shut Up and Listen-This entry discusses "society" and the news.  Is the news really unfair, or is it really just a matter of who's complaining?

That's Not My Name-The news and anonymous sources...is it ethical?

Are You Serious-This blog talks about the ways in which journalists can be cold hearted when it comes to tragedy.

The "Foundation" of News-This blog discusses the importance of investigative reporting.

When Equality Becomes More Than an Issue-This entry shows how equality can sometimes transform into inequality.

Depth: The entries in which I feel that I have made valiant effort.

Editorial Drama-This entry did not receive any comments (it could be due to the fact that I forgot to post it on the course website).  However, I have linked this blog to Greta's chart that she posted on her blog.  I feel that I went into great depth when discussing the topic of the entry.

Just Shut Up and Listen-This blog received 3 comments.  I feel that I have sparked a good discussion on the judgement of the validity of news.  The news seems to carry a lot of controversy.  This blog discusses that controversy.

That's Not My Name-Even though this entry did not receive any comments, I feel as though I have discussed a very important point.  Anonymous sources have significance, but how much significance?

Are You Serious-Even though this was a shorter blog, I feel that it has brought forth one of the major issues of journalism.  I received a comment from Angela that agreed with my blog, but also showed the positive side to a journalist who is investigating a tragedy.

The "Foundation" of News-This blog not only discusses an editorial that I have written related to investigative reporting, but it also link's to another student's, Derek Tickle, blog.

Interaction:

Editorial Attitudes-April Minerd (on comments of the course website)

Unsparing- Documenting concerns / Where does it end?-Wendy Scott

They Have to Make the Right Mistakes-Katie Vann

Anonymous Attackers and Clueless Reporters-Matt Henderson

Liberal Arts to the Rescue-Jessie Krehlik

Sorry Mom-Aja Hannah

The New Buzz Outside the News Hut... Listen Up!-Wendy Scott

Importance of Good Listening-Jennifer Prex

Diversity-What's the Difference?-Josie Rush

Discussion:

 Just Shut Up and Listen-This blog sparked a few comments that discussed people's involvment with the news.  Are they a reliable source if they are too close to the news?

Are You Serious-How ethical is it to bombard a person's life after a great tragedy? People have commented on this entry by stating their feelings on the issue.

Xenoblogging:

Editorial Drama-I have linked this blog to an extremely informative chart done by Greta Carol.

The "Foundation" of News-This blog links to Derek Tickle's blog.

Wildcard:

The "Foundation" of News-Even though I have yet to receive any comments on this blog, I belive that it is the best one that I have written in this portion of the semester.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naming Names

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On page 87 of "John Henry Days," by Colson Whitehead, the characters Dave Brown, Tiny, and Frenchie discuss the world of rock and roll.  Now, after a couple of drinks I am sure that this would be a great topic to talk about and they are reporters, so they probably have some good stuff on some of the celebrities of the world.  However, I kind of got the impression that they were being boastful.

Dave Brown says, "They were the greatest rock and roll band in the world-do you understand what I mean when I say that? They were a thing that could never be again."  It seems as though Dave is attempting to show that he had a first name based relationship with the members of the band.  He goes on to tell stories of the individuals of the band.  It seems that he wants his friends to think that he is better than them because he knows personal things about the "greatest rock and roll band of the world."

Is this any different from society?  I know if I were to meet someone famous, I would definitely throw their name around in front of my friends.  It draws attention to yourself.  Also, Dave and his friends don't seem to be in the highest of social classes, so by relating themselves to celebrities, then they are being placed higher in society.

EL 237

Rumors Rumors Rumors

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In the prologue of "John Henry Days," by Colson Whitehead, many different stories are give about who John Henry actually was.  For me, it was kind of hard to follow along.  I am used to the prologue of a book being something that actually gives me part of the climax.  This way I can see that there is actually a good part to the book.  However, this prologue was set up so that I could see the many different rumors of John Henry.

As a child, I was told the story and sang the song.  I was under the impression that John Henry was a black male who worked on the railroad tracks.  Yes, his real job involved the railroad, but what he actually did was completely different.  I was told that he died after beating a machine that was supposed to work faster than all men. 

This is the first time that I have actually heard any other story.  I have always been under the impression that there was no other story and that the story I was told, was actually what happened.  Now I never knew if it was a true story or not, but even if it was just folklore, I didn't know that the story differed from town to town.

Anyways, I think that Whitehead could have introduced the story a little bit better.  However, his different renditions of John Henry did make me actually want to read the book so that i could find out the validity behind them.

EL 237

Are You Serious?

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I have finally gotten the real side of journalism.  In most of the things that I have read about journalism, journalists are being defended for the difficulties they have to go through to get a "good" story.  After reading the story about the girl that was murdered on her 19th birthday, I was able to see the "real" side of journalism.

I can't imagine losing a person so close to me and having people show up on my front lawn just to do their job.  That shouldn't even be considered a job.  To do something like that, it seems that a person would have to have no morals. 

EL227

What, You Can't Take a Joke?

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Chapter 11 of "Writing about Literature" states that, "Everyone likes to laugh, and shared laughter is part of good relationships; but not everyone can explain why things are funny.  Laughter resists close analysis; it is often unplanned, personal, idiosyncratic, and unpredictable" (166). 

I didn't realize that humor could even be subject to close analyis.  Some of the things we have read for class have had some humorous comments or allusions to them, but until now I did not realize that I was actually looking into why I was laughing at them. 

Laughter just seems to be something that comes naturally, rather than something that I have to find the meaning for.  When I find something funny, I laugh.  However, there are some times when I don't get the joke.  Those are the times when I need to do a "close analysis" of it.  If I still don't get it, then I guess I'm one of those people that takes the fun out of the joke.

EL237

It Makes No Difference to Me

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Langston Hughes writes, "I am twenty-two, colored, born in Winston-Salem."  He is very proud of his color and it seems as though he wants to challenge those who oppose him.  He should be proud of his race.  He should be happy to be the way he is. 

When Hughes says, "But it will be/ part of you, instructor./ You are white-" I believe that he is showing how his professor is racist.  This wouldn't be unnatural considering the time period and the fact that he is the only colored person in his class.

I have also noticed that he says "colored student," rather than "colored boy," or "man."  Hughes has been careful not to be gender biased.  I like that he has done that because he shows that even though people judge him for his color, he refuses to judge anyone else by their differences. 

EL237 

December 2009

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Yea, I Get It

"Marley was dead: to begin with.  There is no doubt whatever about that."

And then:

"There is no doubt that Marley was dead."

Ok, so is Marley dead or not, because I don't know if I'm getting it?

Other than the fact that I am told repeatedly that Marley is dead, I like the way "A Christmas Carol," by Charles Dickens is written.  I have always seen the movie, and I have not ever read the book.  I have also seen the newest version with Jim Carrey playing Ebenezer Scrooge, so while reading this story I can just picture him, and it is awesome.

When comparing the movie and the book, I can see the details that have been added to the movie.  In the movie, Bob Cratchit and Scrooge are working in his office.  It happens to be extremely cold, and Scrooge does not allow Cratchit to put any coal on the fire.  In fact, he has the coal locked in the box.  In the book, it is said that, "External heat and cold had little influence on Scrooge."  Both of these depictions show just how terrible of a person Scrooge is.  The movie and the book both do this effectively.

EL 237

So, What am I Supposed to Do?

It's actually really coincidental that we were asked to read and blog about The Decline of the English Department because I just recently had an in depth conversation, yes with myself, about what would happen if they cut the English program at Seton Hill.  Once I really got to thinking about it, I realized I would have to transfer.  I came to school wanting to be an English teacher, and I was guaranteed a degree if I worked hard for it.  I didn't choose English because it was easy because all of us English majors sure know that it's not, I picked it because of its versatility.  Yes, I can become a teacher, but I can also do other things. 

So, if Seton Hill takes the English program away, I will have to say goodbye to all my friends that I have made and the other English students because I've come this far and I'm not stopping now.  Bring on the papers.

EL 237

BOOOOORRRRIING

The Cavalier Daily was much less exciting than The Harvard Crimson. I found that the larger pictures made it slightly more appealing, but I think that the pictures were compensating for the fact that the web page actually did not have that many stories.  The Harvard Crimson seemed to have more stories to choose from.

Also, The Harvard Crimson was more colorful and it made it look more professional.  I think that society looks for professionalism, and if a site looks bland and boring, then they're probably not going to look into it anymore.  They will also not return to that site, or reccommend it to anyone.

EL 227

Let Me Make a Comment

Considering that red is my favorite color, I really enjoyed the layout of The Harvard Crimson.  I also enjoyed that i had so many options to choose from.  I liked that it didn't have the normal layout of a newspaper.  This way I can skip the "boring" things and go straight to the stories that I would enjoy.  Technically I could do the same thing in a newspaper, but it takes more time to find out what page each story is on and I also would have to flip through the pages.  On this site, I just have to hope that the internet is going fast.

I clicked on the link that was titled "Today in Photos."  I found this interesting because the photo was given a caption, and it was big enough for me to actually see.  Some pictures in the newspaper are too small.  It was also useful because I could click on a certain photo and leave a comment if I wanted to. 

EL 227

Poetry is Expressive

So, what is poetry without sound, rhythm, and rhyme?  The title of Chapter 13 in "Writing about Literature," by Edgar V. Roberts, is "Writing about Prosody Sound, Rhythm, and Rhyme in Poetry.

When thinking about poetry, one typically associates it with rhymes.  In reality, a poem can survive without rhymes, but can it survive without sound, ryhthm, and ryhme?  The answer should be no, but I'm sure there's someone out there that could prove otherwise.  However, for the purpose of this chapter let's just stay normal. 

Roberts says that, "the study of prosody determines how poets control their words so that the sound of a poem complements its expression of emotion and ideas" (182).  So, poetry must have either sound, rhytm, or rhyme in order for the poem to express meaning.  Otherwise, it would just sound like a typical story.  Now that's no fun.

EL 237

I'm Dirty

In this little interactive and fun presentation, I obviously followed the garbage.

I think that a website like this is extremely informative and useful.  It can be used by people my age as well as younger children.  The children may not understand the stats as well, but they would be able to click on certain links and it would still be of some sort of educational value.

Trash and recycling is an extremely important issue presently in the world.  Interactive websites like this can help to inform people on how unfortunate this issue is. 

El 227

Let's Get Wired

The fuction a link performs in the body of a news article is to inform the reader on the bigger issues that the article is not discussing.  A link can provide extra information that an article does not have space for.

I think that this is important because if a reader is interested in the subject, then they will want to know more about it.  Also, if the journalist is able to provide extra information for the reader's interests, then the reader will want to refer to that journalist more often.  It also makes the journalist appear resourceful.  By linking to your article, it can also help to keep you informed on the subject that you are writing about.

EL 227

Link This

A Snapshot of Annual High-Risk College Drinking Consequences-a list of statistics that shows the risks of drinking in college.

Changing the Culture of College Drinking-an article that discusses the benefits of a dry campus.

Opinions on the Dry Campus Policy-a link to a youtube video that shows student's views on the concept of a dry campus.

EL 227

Finding What is Lost

When looking through The New York Times website, I found a video titled A Deck of Lives.  This video showed how South Carolina was using playing cards to help solve unsolved crimes.  The cards were made with the faces of those who have are missing or who have been murdered and the killer or killers were not ever found.  The decks were then sold to prison inmates.  The makers of the cards think that the inmates will recognize the pictures and come forward with information.

The video was very effective because it was able to show how much the inmates actually use the cards.  Also, in a normal newspaper, they would only be able to use a picture.  The video allows readers/ watchers to see and hear the full effect of the playing cards.

EL 227

How We Protect Ourselves

"Locks are locked, are doublechecked, sometimes by remote control with beeps," (245)

Colso Whitehead shows how society does not trust one another in part four of "John Henry Days."  What are locks, sunglasses, and mud flaps for? Protection.  Protection from whom?  Members of society have succeeded in showing one another that we don't trust each other.

There are legitimate reasons for this mistrust, but it is slightly sad and annoying that we have to go to certain lengths to protect ourselves from our surrounding community.

Mud flaps and sunglasses, however, are a different story.  Sunglasses protect our eyes from the sun, so why do I see so many people wearing sunglasses at night.  Can protection just become a form of style?  This is slightly upsetting because I know that if wearing a padlock around your neck ever became stylish, I would not do it.  Wait, I think I've already seen a couple people wearing something like this.

Portfolio 3

Coverage: Here is the third list of blogs that I have posted at this time in the semester.

You Can't Always Get What You Want-This entry discusses the need for an explanation in "Maus," by Art Spiegelman.  Not only the readers are left confused, but also the characters.

Imagery Can be Intense!-Imagery can be very useful as an appeal to readers.  It might even make you hungry.

The Masque of the Swine Flu I Mean the Red Death-A parallel between the Red Death and the swine flu.

How Much More Can We Learn About Setting?-Is setting just getting boring, or are we just getting started?

Being Proud of Something You Actually Worked For-Discussion about an editorial regarding Barack Obama and the Nobel Peace Prize.

That's What Friends are For-This entry discusses a sonnet written by William Shakespeare.  Is he really sharing a private moment with the world?

Appreciate the Finer Things in Life, and No That Does Not Mean Your Diamond Pinky Ring-This blog talks about how John Keats, the author of On First Looking Into Chapman's Homer, shows the ability to appreciate the things that aren't worth an amount of money.

Catching the Swine Flu-Another one of my entries that parallels the swine flu.  However, this entry discusses how metaphors and similes can help readers determine the unknown.

Opposites Attract-This blog shows the relationship between opposites in Miss Brill, by Katherine Mansfield.

It Makes No Difference to Me-In this entry I have attempted to show how Langston Hughes attempts to stay away from stereotypes in all categories.

What, You Can't Take a Joke?-Can you have a close analysis of a laugh?

Rumors Rumors Rumors-This blog entry discusses how rumors can change a story.

Naming Names-Everyone wants to look cool, so why not throw a celebrities name out there to improve your status?

How We Protect Ourselves-Again, looking cool can make people revert to extremes.  This time, however, it involves a padlock and a steel chain.

Depth: The entries in which I feel that I have made valiant effort.

You Can't Always Get What You Want-I believe that this entry has brought forth some major issues in many books.

The Masque of the Swine Flu I Mean the Red Death-I think that I did an excellent job comparing the Red Death to the swine flu. 

That's What Friends are For-This blog is important not only in the text of the sonnet, but for society as a whole.

Opposites Attract-I feel that this blog really focuses on an important aspect of Miss Brill

Naming Names-This shows the importance of looking good in society.

How We Protect Ourselves-I believe that this blog takes a societal trend and explains it.

Interaction:

Mausie Maus-Shellie Polly

Shellie refers to the ending of "Maus," by Art Spiegelman.  Gladys also commented on Shellie's blog to discuss the ending.  We are all in agreement that the ending of the book was a little abrupt, and we would have like him to elaborate a little.

Framed Comic Frames-David Wilbanks

Dave explains that the framing used in "Maus" adds more "human element to the story.  The interaction makes the story more relatable.  I then explained to Dave that I believe this book should be used to teach children about the Holocaust because of Art's use of pictures and frames.

What's the Matter With Vladek?-Gladys Mares

Gladys discusses how she feels bad for Vladek's second wife, Mala.  I agree with her in saying that she should not be treated so unfairly, and that he should actually be able to relate to her better because they have so much in common.

Can You Imagine? Nope-Aja Hannah

Aja tells us about the difficulties of reading something that has footnotes.  She says, "the time it took me to look up each meaning took me out of the poem."  I also lose track of what is going on in the poem when I have to refer to something else just to understand it.  It is frustrating.  Aja was able to point out the problems with this occurence.

Dear Prince Prospero,-Jessica Orlowski

In this letter that Jessica has written for her blog entry, she has voiced her concerns about the stupidity of Prince Prospero in The Masque of the Red Death. 

By doing so, she has brought up a point that I have focused on earlier in my blogging.  I have compared Prospero's attempt to escape the Red Death to society's attempt to avoid the swine flu.  As much as you put yourself above the swine flu, you still have just as much of a chance to get it as those who are not on your "level."

On Setting...-Cody Naylor

Cody discusses how Chapter 6 of "Writing about Literature" was unecessary for the class to read.  I agreed, however, I stated that a little reminder wouldn't hurt.

Woe and Moan-Melissa Schwenk

Melissa points out the uses of "woe" and "moan" in Shakespeare's sonnet "When to the Session of Sweet Silent Thought."  I did not realize this use, and once I realized how he had utilized those words in the sonnet, it changed my perspective of the tone.

Read it Out Loud-Carissa Altizer

Factual vs Flowery-Brooke Kuehn

Brooke states that sometimes it is more effective to cut out flowery word usage (newswriting much).  I, however, am always attempting to add flowery words to my writing so that it seems like I actually know what I am talking about.  In reality, it just seems like I am trying too hard.

Poor Miss Brill-Aja Hannah

Miss Brill is just a little, old, lonely lady.  Aja says that it is wrong for the people to treat her the way that she is being treated.  I believe that Miss Brill represents the older part of society, my grandmother.  Even though my Grandmother was not as "crazy" as Miss Brill, there were some similarities.  Jessie Krehlik also agrees with this.

Always Have a Purpose-Melissa Schwenk

Melissa reminds us that there akways has to be a purpose behind writing.  I agree in saying that there have been multiple times in which i have gone into a research paper without having an actual purpose, and it always turned out to be more difficult.

Definately a Student-David Wilbanks

Dave does a very good job of relating to Langston Hughes without addressing race.  I believe that this makes it easier for society to open up to issues of race.

Beware of Tone-Gladys Mares

REPETITIVENESS!!!

Timeliness:

 You Can't Always Get What You Want-Written October 17, and due October 19.

Imagery Can be Intense-Written October 17, due October 19.

The Masque of the Swine Flu I Mean the Red Death-Written October 21 (before class), due October 21.

How Much More Can We Learn About Setting?-Written October 20, due October 21.

That's What Friends are For-Written October 27, due October 28.

Appreciate the Finer Things in Life, and No That Does Not Mean Your Diamond Pinky Ring-Written October 27, due October 28.

Catching the Swine Flu-Written October 27, due October 28.

Opposites Attract-Written October 30 (before class), due October 30.

How We Protect Ourselves-Written November 10, due November 11.

Discussion:

You Can't Always Get What You Want

Dave finished the song, then agreed with what I had to say.  He is confused as to why Holocaust survivors would commit suicide if they had already been through such a terrible time.

The Masque of the Swine Flu I Mean the Red Death

By linking my blog to Jessica Orlowski's blog, I have introduced her to my take on the Red Death.  She replied by stating that society has a selfish side.  Therefore, Poe may have been referring to that rather than actually discussing running away from disease.

That's What Friends are For

Aja discusses not only my blog when she commented, but also Josie's blog.  She describes how sometimes it's easier to get things out than to hold them in.

 Opposites Attract

Aja agrees with what I have written by stating that there is no middle for Miss Brill, and that it is all opposites.  She then suggests that Miss Brill should buy a ferret or something to keep her company.

It Makes No Difference to Me

In this blog, Aja has disagreed with me and put a different perspective into my take on Langton Hughes' poem.  I believe that Langston Hughes has avoided saying boy because he wanted to be fair to all genders, but Aja has showed me that "boy" was an insult during that time period.

How We Protect Ourselves

People go to great lengths to protect themselves.  In my blog, Jessie Krehlik points out that people can actually be "cold" to one another throughout this "protection."  Aja then shows that even though they have gone to such great lengths, people are still harmed.

Xenoblogging:

The Masque of the Swine Flu I Mean the Red Death I have linked this blog to Jessica Orlowski's blog Dear Prince Prospero,

Wildcard:

I feel that this blog is the most fun and interesting one that I have written at this point in the semester, so check it out :). The Masque of the Swine Flu I Mean the Red Death 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When Equality Becomes More Than an Issue

"In several cities, older members of minority groups acknowledged that the newspaper -- along with life in general -- had greatly changed for the better from the time of their childhood."

I agree with this quote.  Newspapers and life in general have become more fair and equal.  However, in an attempt to make life equal, society has developed a lot more inequality.  "Best Practices for Newspapers and Journalists," by Robert J. Haiman, discusses how news centers attempt to develop a more diverse working enivonment.  If the management was being unfair to people of certain races by not hiring them, then yes that is a problem.  However, news centers are trying to make it more diverse by hiring people that are NOT white.  So, what happens if a white person is more qualified for a job than the black person, but there is a need for a certain percentage of black people?  This is unfair to the white person because he/she better deserves the position.

I have heard that many colleges today must have a certain percentage of minorites accepted.  In other words, even if a non-minority person has more potential than that minority, they still might not be accepted. 

It is good that people are trying to abolish racism, but by doing things such as this, they are creating an even bigger issue.

EL 227

The "Foundation" of News

Dr. Jerz states, "Investigative journalism is needed to uncover important stories which people want to hide."

Investigative journalism is extremely important for society.  Society needs to know certain things, and without investigative journalism, it would be extremely difficult for us to uncover those things.

My newswriting class pitched ideas for investigative news stories.  Derek Tickle (click for Derek's rendition of investigative reporting) proposed an idea that involved a cover up of swine flu throughout universities, including Seton Hill.  I had actually written an editorial about this cover up for one of my other classes.  In this editorial, I discussed how important it is for people to know how many cases of swine flu there actually are in certain areas, specifically college campuses. 

Due to the fact that it was an editorial, I did not attempt to uncover anything that the school had been hiding.  However, I went off of what I had heard students and school officials discussing.  Derek has the ability to actually show when and how universities are covering up the swine flu.  This will then allow the society of Seton Hill and other schools to understand the real dangers of the sickness.

Back to class

Portfolio 3

Coverage and Timeliness: Here is the third list of blogs that I have posted at this time in the semester.  These are also the blogs that I have posted on time and ready for scrutiny, I mean to be looked at.

Editorial Drama-Are editorials credible or just opinionated? This blog discusses the use of editorials in the news.

Just Shut Up and Listen-This entry discusses "society" and the news.  Is the news really unfair, or is it really just a matter of who's complaining?

That's Not My Name-The news and anonymous sources...is it ethical?

Are You Serious-This blog talks about the ways in which journalists can be cold hearted when it comes to tragedy.

The "Foundation" of News-This blog discusses the importance of investigative reporting.

When Equality Becomes More Than an Issue-This entry shows how equality can sometimes transform into inequality.

Depth: The entries in which I feel that I have made valiant effort.

Editorial Drama-This entry did not receive any comments (it could be due to the fact that I forgot to post it on the course website).  However, I have linked this blog to Greta's chart that she posted on her blog.  I feel that I went into great depth when discussing the topic of the entry.

Just Shut Up and Listen-This blog received 3 comments.  I feel that I have sparked a good discussion on the judgement of the validity of news.  The news seems to carry a lot of controversy.  This blog discusses that controversy.

That's Not My Name-Even though this entry did not receive any comments, I feel as though I have discussed a very important point.  Anonymous sources have significance, but how much significance?

Are You Serious-Even though this was a shorter blog, I feel that it has brought forth one of the major issues of journalism.  I received a comment from Angela that agreed with my blog, but also showed the positive side to a journalist who is investigating a tragedy.

The "Foundation" of News-This blog not only discusses an editorial that I have written related to investigative reporting, but it also link's to another student's, Derek Tickle, blog.

Interaction:

Editorial Attitudes-April Minerd (on comments of the course website)

Unsparing- Documenting concerns / Where does it end?-Wendy Scott

They Have to Make the Right Mistakes-Katie Vann

Anonymous Attackers and Clueless Reporters-Matt Henderson

Liberal Arts to the Rescue-Jessie Krehlik

Sorry Mom-Aja Hannah

The New Buzz Outside the News Hut... Listen Up!-Wendy Scott

Importance of Good Listening-Jennifer Prex

Diversity-What's the Difference?-Josie Rush

Discussion:

 Just Shut Up and Listen-This blog sparked a few comments that discussed people's involvment with the news.  Are they a reliable source if they are too close to the news?

Are You Serious-How ethical is it to bombard a person's life after a great tragedy? People have commented on this entry by stating their feelings on the issue.

Xenoblogging:

Editorial Drama-I have linked this blog to an extremely informative chart done by Greta Carol.

The "Foundation" of News-This blog links to Derek Tickle's blog.

Wildcard:

The "Foundation" of News-Even though I have yet to receive any comments on this blog, I belive that it is the best one that I have written in this portion of the semester.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Naming Names

On page 87 of "John Henry Days," by Colson Whitehead, the characters Dave Brown, Tiny, and Frenchie discuss the world of rock and roll.  Now, after a couple of drinks I am sure that this would be a great topic to talk about and they are reporters, so they probably have some good stuff on some of the celebrities of the world.  However, I kind of got the impression that they were being boastful.

Dave Brown says, "They were the greatest rock and roll band in the world-do you understand what I mean when I say that? They were a thing that could never be again."  It seems as though Dave is attempting to show that he had a first name based relationship with the members of the band.  He goes on to tell stories of the individuals of the band.  It seems that he wants his friends to think that he is better than them because he knows personal things about the "greatest rock and roll band of the world."

Is this any different from society?  I know if I were to meet someone famous, I would definitely throw their name around in front of my friends.  It draws attention to yourself.  Also, Dave and his friends don't seem to be in the highest of social classes, so by relating themselves to celebrities, then they are being placed higher in society.

EL 237

Rumors Rumors Rumors

In the prologue of "John Henry Days," by Colson Whitehead, many different stories are give about who John Henry actually was.  For me, it was kind of hard to follow along.  I am used to the prologue of a book being something that actually gives me part of the climax.  This way I can see that there is actually a good part to the book.  However, this prologue was set up so that I could see the many different rumors of John Henry.

As a child, I was told the story and sang the song.  I was under the impression that John Henry was a black male who worked on the railroad tracks.  Yes, his real job involved the railroad, but what he actually did was completely different.  I was told that he died after beating a machine that was supposed to work faster than all men. 

This is the first time that I have actually heard any other story.  I have always been under the impression that there was no other story and that the story I was told, was actually what happened.  Now I never knew if it was a true story or not, but even if it was just folklore, I didn't know that the story differed from town to town.

Anyways, I think that Whitehead could have introduced the story a little bit better.  However, his different renditions of John Henry did make me actually want to read the book so that i could find out the validity behind them.

EL 237

Are You Serious?

I have finally gotten the real side of journalism.  In most of the things that I have read about journalism, journalists are being defended for the difficulties they have to go through to get a "good" story.  After reading the story about the girl that was murdered on her 19th birthday, I was able to see the "real" side of journalism.

I can't imagine losing a person so close to me and having people show up on my front lawn just to do their job.  That shouldn't even be considered a job.  To do something like that, it seems that a person would have to have no morals. 

EL227

What, You Can't Take a Joke?

Chapter 11 of "Writing about Literature" states that, "Everyone likes to laugh, and shared laughter is part of good relationships; but not everyone can explain why things are funny.  Laughter resists close analysis; it is often unplanned, personal, idiosyncratic, and unpredictable" (166). 

I didn't realize that humor could even be subject to close analyis.  Some of the things we have read for class have had some humorous comments or allusions to them, but until now I did not realize that I was actually looking into why I was laughing at them. 

Laughter just seems to be something that comes naturally, rather than something that I have to find the meaning for.  When I find something funny, I laugh.  However, there are some times when I don't get the joke.  Those are the times when I need to do a "close analysis" of it.  If I still don't get it, then I guess I'm one of those people that takes the fun out of the joke.

EL237

It Makes No Difference to Me

Langston Hughes writes, "I am twenty-two, colored, born in Winston-Salem."  He is very proud of his color and it seems as though he wants to challenge those who oppose him.  He should be proud of his race.  He should be happy to be the way he is. 

When Hughes says, "But it will be/ part of you, instructor./ You are white-" I believe that he is showing how his professor is racist.  This wouldn't be unnatural considering the time period and the fact that he is the only colored person in his class.

I have also noticed that he says "colored student," rather than "colored boy," or "man."  Hughes has been careful not to be gender biased.  I like that he has done that because he shows that even though people judge him for his color, he refuses to judge anyone else by their differences. 

EL237 

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