April 12, 2007

Kevin made an Awesome Carnival, If I could ever have a break, I'd go!

Go have some hotdogs and meet the Tres Amigo's at Kevin's Carnival! I shall join for Portfolio 3, if that's cool with the Carnie!

Posted by ErinWaite at 5:44 PM | Comments (0)

March 1, 2007

Word up: Icon

I thought this rather appropriate with all the talk of it in the readings this week. It's a sign that shows what it represents by it's similarity to whatever noun it's depicting. A noun, is a person, place, or thing in case you never took English in elementary school (ha-ha). The term is also used to represent religious figures like our buddy, J.C. Some other examples would be the pictures you click on to get somewhere on the computer faster. Hmmm.... how about a picture of a squirrel? Guess what that stands for....

Posted by ErinWaite at 10:10 AM | Comments (2)

February 6, 2007

Word of the Week: Elegy

Here are I go with another poetic term (know where my favor lies, huh?). In Greek and Roman times, an elegy was used to refer to any poem composed in elegiac meter (alternating dactylic hexameter and pentameter lines). In the 17th century, it was used to describe loss, but in Elizabethan times it was for love (Murfin, Ray 130-131). I found it really interesting that "American Pie" (the song not the movie) is considered an elegy because it was written about Buddy Holly. I've never written an elegy, but I have plenty of dead goldfish and hermit crabs named after my dad's friends and a priest that may just appreciate my attempts.

Posted by ErinWaite at 12:04 PM | Comments (2)

November 13, 2006

Job names: Custom made for an instant ego boost

I wrote these just to make everyone realize how self-absorbed we are with our daily roles. Lighten up, if you're not exciting (ridiculous) enough to make reality TV, that's means you're pretty normal. If you have any more I could add let me know. I don't want to leave anything out and I apologize profusely to anyone who thinks I'm being offensive. I'm sure your boss will be glad to remind there is no "I" in team if you whine to her about this.

(fill in the blank with your favorite ice cream concoction) technician:No joke, these people at an ice cream place have shirts that render them with the power of ice cream technicians, which will allow them to put gummy bears in your ice cream and put roses on Aunt Hilda's 80th birthday cake. Don't mess with 'em.

Child care attendants: These people have one of the hardest jobs (I'd be scared to do it). They sometimes wear pumpkin vests, have finger paint in their hair, carry juiceboxes in their fanny packs, and know how to remove any body fluid stain from "play clothes." Or we could just be downers and call them Super-good parents, but that would be too offensive.

Cart attendants: Those ones that wear the orange vests and make sure Grandma or Bicycle Bob don't try to take the carts home for their own personal usage. They also have free reign on that cool riding machine that picks up all the carts. You get extra points if you don't hit pedestrians with the carts!

Servers: They used to be called waiters. (yes, I am one, so I get extra technical points on this one). Now they do much more than just wait for people to make ridiculous food requests! They even have the ability to text their friends about how they want to go somewhere else to eat later, smoke cigarettes by the dumpster, and explain to people that they won't get some made-up obscure disease from eating the chicken or whatever the "bad food" is on the news. We're go-getters and we'll get you your 5th diet coke to go with your deep-fried oreos because you've had a hard day.

Sales rep: Not to be mixed up with the Sales Associate. That one who keeps calling you long-distance from a far-away land you can't pronounce that tells you you've won a vacation to Wisconsin but you have to pay for it by giving them your first born. They are especially effective when you are eating an extremely good dinner or trying to not be late for your own very important job. You hear the ring and you think, "What if someone kicked the bucket? By golly I'd better answer." This is there speciality that makes them even more important than the rest of us. For these are the time-keepers...


Sales Associates: They are the true disappearing artists. They are like locusts when they want to win a t-shirt for selling the most laxatives or ballpoint pens and always attack you when your broke. They can amazingly disappear as soon as you want to know where to find toilet paper or something you might actually need. If they are well trained they will spend hours to convince anyone that maroon spandex stirrup pants would be an awesome outfit for your mom's wedding. If they are the passive-aggressive types, they will just let you read their vest and nametag saying they want to help you and look extremely surprised if you say the name on the tag. They think you are spying on them. Paranoid, but handy.

Birthing partner: Isn't that the person who's hand you squeeze and ears you deafen if you are a woman screaming with labor pains? This is also the one who must scour the hospital for edible food ( or run to Starbucks and Sheetz ) to feed the Mama-to-be. This person is also required to be a stunt driver, funny breathing initiator, and birthing entertainment director (Mom wants tamborines and acrobats or maybe just some crossword puzzles if the kid doesn't want to come out right away). Maybe it's just my imagination, but while some people don't enjoy this job, but the ones that do sure love 'The Miracle of Birth!"


College Student: There are countless hybrids and breeds of these popping up daily. These scholarly figures attend lectures in pajamas, eat food that is especially crunchy when they're superiors are making important points, forget to separate laundry or fill up the gas tank, while still maintaining a decent GPA and playing other role of parents, kids, and friends at the same time! They set a precedent for older people struggling to relive their youth. They participate in events that involve strange rules, code words, or perhaps household items. They occupy the largest amounts of "important jobs" out there such as servers, sales associates, sales reps, and more as they struggle to be whatever it was they wanted to be when they grew up. Right now it could be philosophy/poli-sci/ double with a advertising/music teaching minor, but they just might run off to the desert and farm cactus for awhile to "study abroad" or "get my head together." Some can even write essays on Pizza Hut placemats, write lesson plans in crayon, or attach multiple bumper stickers to their cars. This super-special occupation has a huge-turnover rate and may involve Jack Daniel's, multiple Starbucks trips or simply "A people who like horses club" to take the edge off their stressful lives. We are the future, kinda scary.

Posted by ErinWaite at 11:48 PM | Comments (2)

Erin speak: Schmoozablility/You schmooze you won't lose

Def: One's ability to persuade others to do your bidding by using your best people skills. Syn. charming, buttering up, selling.
Examples and other forms:
1.She used her schmooze to get him to tie her shoes.
2.He schmoozed his boss into letting him wear his Superman cape to work and smoke behind the dumpster during rush hour.
3. He's crazy but he knows how to take the ladies for a schmoozin'.
4. She's got a certain schmoozability that allows me to like her even though I want to shake her sometimes for forgetting my name every five minutes.
5. Those little schmoozers always manage to get free french fries from the "rapid food technicians" aka Burger Flippers (we have to give everyone special names now. I made that one up because we're so politcally correct about everyone's roles in life it makes me want to vomit. We're all just people dammit! See my list of other annoying technical names for our daily roles and please don't be offended, I make jabs at myself and everyone's jobs and make up some of my own names in this one )

Posted by ErinWaite at 11:23 PM | Comments (0)

Blog Port. Dos is definitely the most.....

....Uneventful ( or sucky? nah...well kinda.) Still blogging at least once a day. Now that everyone's creating IF, really having fun with things, and the end of the year is rapidly approaching, I am getting in my sloooogggg mode. This is when the pressure (aka Joy) of the holidays is making me feel like I'm moving in quicksand. ‘Kay that was pretty random, but I've had so much happen this semester that I feel like I lived at least 5 lives. Now I'll shut up with this background noise and show you one of the lives....

Birth (of ideas):Coverage (well, not much, you're born naked usually right? Maybe next year yuppies will figure out how to give birth to babies pre-clad in Louis Vuitton and great shoes for a grand entrance in the hospital) entrance into a world of people who think they know everything and in the end realize: we still know nothing but had fun trying to figure out what we did learn and love, from way-back-in-the-day. We take that same knowledge and try to pass it down to “…kids who just don’t get what is was like to have to go on MySpace or hang out in McDonalds parking lots and/or bus stops, and perhaps have “White Window-less Vans” following us to have a kickin’ social life.”:
Congo time
Wiki's fun--not!
Schmoozability usability
Childhood: More DEPTH than a puddle (toys and candy, everyone and everything makes you laugh, like bodily fluid jokes and gnomes named David)

Big Mama
Gettin' down again
Be Vewy quite, I'm huntin' a wumpus
IF World

Adolescence: If TIMELINESS is your thing, this is the worst/best time of your life (“I hate my…” and who do those (stereotypes) think they are, just cuz they wear those pants…) This entry is a sketchy example, but the other entries are on time...

Dwarves are cool
IF rough cut
Perverse people
Old school


Adulthood, you DISCUSS your “responsibilities,” but still having fun shirking them just for a minute….or more.
(aka suburbia sux n we gossip about other bus stop moms and quickly switch to drinking at 2 in the afternoon just cuz we can, cuz I’m the adult, and “because I said so.” This will be my favorite parent cliché bomb to drop on my future kids when I want to annoy them as much as they’ll annoy me.

Prepping
Tog
Galatea

Death: COMMENTS of others at the funeral about how you Lived

Primo: “Uncle Dale was the first person to pass out at the family reunions, ‘lil Becky,” (fast and painless words on someone else’s blog.)
Rachel
Cherie

Grande: “’Member how we was all at the far hall makin’ hotdogs for Cheyenne’s weddin n’ right after, at home, Aunt Janice split her pants tryin to get the ‘fridgerator off the porch cuz we was havin’ company an’ they was gonna take our pitcher, but then you crapped your pants so….” (Shut up, strange relatives. I think you’re at the wrong funeral because Uncle Dale was the one the crapped his pants in MY family.”) * The big rant on someone else’s blog that gets kicked around a good bit.*
Cherie
Karissa
Tiffany


*Don’t know where all of the above came from, but I do know about wheelbarrows and Guinevere (this blog’s themed for you, Shannon), and if you watch closely monkeys also fly out sometimes too.*

Wildcard: If we have nametags, a vest, or a whistle, we have authority!

Posted by ErinWaite at 9:46 PM | Comments (0)

November 7, 2006

This doesn't make any sense... (ideas for first IF game)


I want to write about a group of 6 getting stuck in an abandoned Wal-Mart (or some other lovely discount store) for a night or week, depending on what choices you make. You can choose who your character teams up with to try and get out because the others will drive you crazy. Pick one to buddy up with.
A) a grandma that is mostly deaf B) Steroid Steve, who will keep you in shape at least, C) Jenny Jupiter, a foot model and Paris Hilton wannabe, D) Todd the hot dog champ. Huge dork, but is renowned for his hot dog eating skills and the fact that he cannot stop stuttering E) Chrissy the soccer mom, who wears vests and loves cats.

Your character is a college student who’s working as a Walmart stock boy and part-time elf for a very alcoholic Santa Clause. You were sent to this location to help for Christmas, when meanwhile, you are given the keys to open and the others are there for a huge sale they read about, even though it’s been shut down before anyone even found out (I know it’s a stretch, help!) because it was a call-girl hang out. You want to get out or you’ll be doomed to Walmart elfdom forever.

Choose your partner well, because whoever you choose to bond with in the toiletries section will affect the ending you have. Once you pick your partner, you’ll have to figure out how to eat, entertain yourselves, and how to combat the other crazy people, who will cause you drama unless you find that right tools to bribe them with. After successfully dealing with survival issues, you will have 3 options of getting out. 1. Get Steroid Steve to break down some doors, but alarms may go off and if you are suspected of robbery, you may go to jail. 2. Use Jenny to txt various people or flash the cars passing by the abandoned parking lot to get possible rescuers. 3. You, grandma, and soccer mom manage to fake grandma’s death somehow so you’ll all get some money or maybe be heroes in the end. This is all very sketchy and doesn’t make sense yet, but if I can some ways of why they can’t get out of Walmart in the first place this will all come together, I hope.

Posted by ErinWaite at 9:50 PM | Comments (0)

How to capture the essence of a dwarf

Ask the Adventure Dwarf was a good way to start us off writing our own IF, but I think I'll need a lot more practice. The tips in the Exposition helped me get somewhat of a clue on how to start. Showing and not telling still applies to IF. In terms of the garage band, I guess it's a good idea not to bring up characters or other aspects that will not be used in your story. I liked the start of "The Big Mama" that Karissa and I played, because it described the scenery but also gave you choices on where to walk and how to respond right away.

The only thing I know about dwarves is, if I were to create a game about a dwarf, David the gnome is definitely my "little friend". That was my favorite show when I was little and I just found a cool site for it, however irrelevant it may be.

Posted by ErinWaite at 9:10 PM | Comments (0)

How to capture the essence of a dwarf

Ask the Adventure Dwarf was a good way to start us off writing our own IF, but I think I'll need a lot more practice. The tips in the Exposition helped me get somewhat of a clue on how to start. Showing and not telling still applies to IF. In terms of the garage band, I guess it's a good idea not to bring up characters or other aspects that will not be used in your story. I liked the start of "The Big Mama" that Karissa and I played, because it described the scenery but also gave you choices on where to walk and how to respond right away.

The only thing I know about dwarves is, if I were to create a game about a dwarf, David the gnome is definitely my "little friend". That was my favorite show when I was little and I just found a cool site for it, however irrelevant it may be.

Posted by ErinWaite at 9:10 PM | Comments (0)

The Wonderful World of IF

Starting from my experience with Galatea, I learned that it's best to keep it simple when it comes to directions. Touch, walk north, talk to, are best. If not, you engage in button-mashing and curse words. My next experience and probably the most fun, was when Karissa and I played "The Big Mama" together. We both experienced different endings and realized the importance of being a gentleman. I noticed that many of the Romance IF games were like the Slice of Life ones in that it's all about getting dumped or drunk. Kind of sad, makes me wonder isn't there more to life?

My playlist gives a pretty good summary of my IF experience, but I gained more insight from Cherie'sPhotopia and the Phone booth game These were really the first games I played on the computer since good old Tetris and Oregon Trail, so that shows my old-schoolness too much!

Finally, I looked for some websites for the games I'd played and here's what I found:
Roger Ostrander, who wrote the Annoyed Undead also teaches about making music in your games. I also found that Brendan Barnwell, who wrote "The Big Mama" also wrote "Stick it to the Man," which my friend ended up playing for an hour, so maybe you'll like it! If you have any suggestions for me, do tell, as I didn't enjoy sticking it.

Posted by ErinWaite at 8:18 PM | Comments (0)

What playlist?!

I was a little leary of creating this because I didn't get half as far as everyone else in IF, but I ended up having fun and forgot to actually blog about it! Here's the list:

Acid Whiplash:
Here, I met Ryebread Celsius who smelled like goat and learned all about how witty he could be. Then I walked into a tooth, got lost for a few minutes and had some fun with the Tooth Beaver. I couldn't find Tilly the Tacky though and after about 30 minutes I gave up.

Dinner with Andre:
I went out with Andre and we had some wine. He made crappy small talk and tried to proposition me. The waiter ended up being my savior. I stuffed so rolls in my purse, hit the bathroom, and left during one instance. Another time, I got to know Andre and we took a walk and he ended up being my "soul mate" can we say ick? This game was very cliched and definitely outdid any cheesy romance I'd already read at the beach.

Hunt the Wumpus:
I bumbled around with my gun and shot myself several times, but dammit, I got that wumpus. It was very childish, but I got pleasure out of actually accomplishing something other than going on a date with a creep or talking to animals...not bad.

The Annoyed Undead:
This one was fun! I got to terrorize citizens who were invading my crypt area and while nobody really put up a fight, I had a heck of a time just trying to get out of my crypt. I kept walking north and then a door would be shut or my escape would be blocked, ew!

Posted by ErinWaite at 8:02 PM | Comments (0)

November 3, 2006

Gettin' down w/ Big Mama...again?!

I gave a preview of where Karissa and I were so far on Big Mama last night. What surprised me the most was how much fun I had, considering I was one of the only dorks that struggled with Galatea. "I"ended up getting dumped by my girl for an inexplicable reason that I thought would be revealed once I went past the "gee-dunks" (aka porn shops, surf shops, sno-cone stands) and then ended up getting my "gentleman skills" tested by a girl named Emily. I was so happy just to get this far because at first, I kept getting the responses, "That's not a verb," or "Wow, where'd you come up with that one?". Karissa encountered Emily too, but she also got further and got to meet a lifeguard, a little kid, and someone who sounded like a disgruntled drunk. Here are my favorite quotes from her encounters:I played a couple times and found a couple endings (I copied and
pasted them into a blog entry so that I could keep track of them...
and to prove to Jerz that I did, infact, play the game to the end...
or at least one of the ends... since the creator doesn't say how many
there are...) Haha. Anyway, I also did not find out the "reason"
(which seemed pretty important and profound in the beginning) that "I"
was dumped.

I met the girl in the bikini named Emily and she took me to her
"amazing" beach house. We ended up sort of looking like a couple at
the ending... But then there was the lifeguard on the beach, too (and
I don't know what it is with the red bathing suits.. If I recall
correctly, the bikini that Emily was supposedly wearing is red also...
But I don't remember). I had a couple different conversations with the
lifeguard, and I couldn't seem to offend her or anything (even though
I tried a little after reading your email, since I hadn't thought to
try something that isn't "me." The lifeguard either wasn't interested,
or just sort of fell in love with me after I said that I loved the
ocean or that her job sounded "great."

I also talked to a surfer guy, a (very grumpy) fisherman, and a child
building a sandcastle. One of the really interesting endings that I
found was when I got "wisdom" from the kid and the story ended.. Haha,
I was sort of surprised. But pleasantly, so, since it didn't involve a
relationship or "hooking up" or anything random and gross.

"Two last random things: I'm not sure, but I think that the game might
possibly keep track of what day of the week it is (because when I
spoke to Emily she said she was just hanging out on a Thursday
night!). CREEPY?! ... Also, I thought that it was interesting that the
game used metric measurements. And when it said a sign in "miles," the
character said something about them being stupid. Haha :)"

Okay, that was a big honkin' chunk of her e-mail to me, but I thought it was so funny, I had to share. While this game was relatively (can't spell this morning) simple, we still didn't find out why we were dumped, but we did see an age-old cliche ("nice guys finish last") get contradicted numerous times!

Most importantly, I learned that while a game can be descriptive and simple, the way you ask the question effects the game as a whole. Descriptions are everything, though, especially when you don't have the X-box right in front of you. I know I enjoy IF much more than all of that, so overall, this was a good experience for me. As an added bonus, the boyfriend said something like,
"I have to observe my grandma or talk about why partying is bad for my homework and you get to play games...isn't that a little unfair?"

Posted by ErinWaite at 10:36 AM | Comments (0)

Gettin' down w/ Big Mama...again?!

I gave a preview of where Karissa and I were so far on Big Mama last night. What surprised me the most was how much fun I had, considering I was one of the only dorks that struggled with Galatea. "I"ended up getting dumped by my girl for an inexplicable reason that I thought would be revealed once I went past the "gee-dunks" (aka porn shops, surf shops, sno-cone stands) and then ended up getting my "gentleman skills" tested by a girl named Emily. I was so happy just to get this far because at first, I kept getting the responses, "That's not a verb," or "Wow, where'd you come up with that one?". Karissa encountered Emily too, but she also got further and got to meet a lifeguard, a little kid, and someone who sounded like a disgruntled drunk. Here are my favorite quotes from her encounters:I played a couple times and found a couple endings (I copied and
pasted them into a blog entry so that I could keep track of them...
and to prove to Jerz that I did, infact, play the game to the end...
or at least one of the ends... since the creator doesn't say how many
there are...) Haha. Anyway, I also did not find out the "reason"
(which seemed pretty important and profound in the beginning) that "I"
was dumped.

I met the girl in the bikini named Emily and she took me to her
"amazing" beach house. We ended up sort of looking like a couple at
the ending... But then there was the lifeguard on the beach, too (and
I don't know what it is with the red bathing suits.. If I recall
correctly, the bikini that Emily was supposedly wearing is red also...
But I don't remember). I had a couple different conversations with the
lifeguard, and I couldn't seem to offend her or anything (even though
I tried a little after reading your email, since I hadn't thought to
try something that isn't "me." The lifeguard either wasn't interested,
or just sort of fell in love with me after I said that I loved the
ocean or that her job sounded "great."

I also talked to a surfer guy, a (very grumpy) fisherman, and a child
building a sandcastle. One of the really interesting endings that I
found was when I got "wisdom" from the kid and the story ended.. Haha,
I was sort of surprised. But pleasantly, so, since it didn't involve a
relationship or "hooking up" or anything random and gross.

"Two last random things: I'm not sure, but I think that the game might
possibly keep track of what day of the week it is (because when I
spoke to Emily she said she was just hanging out on a Thursday
night!). CREEPY?! ... Also, I thought that it was interesting that the
game used metric measurements. And when it said a sign in "miles," the
character said something about them being stupid. Haha :)"

Okay, that was a big honkin' chunk of her e-mail to me, but I thought it was so funny, I had to share. While this game was relatively (can't spell this morning) simple, we still didn't find out why we were dumped, but we did see an age-old cliche ("nice guys finish last") get contradicted numerous times!

Most importantly, I learned that while a game can be descriptive and simple, the way you ask the question effects the game as a whole. Descriptions are everything, though, especially when you don't have the X-box right in front of you. I know I enjoy IF much more than all of that, so overall, this was a good experience for me. As an added bonus, the boyfriend said something like,
"I have to observe my grandma or talk about why partying is bad for my homework and you get to play games...isn't that a little unfair?"

Posted by ErinWaite at 10:36 AM | Comments (0)

November 2, 2006

Who's your Big Mama?

Well now, Miss Kilgore and I had quite a time just trying to find something that we didn't have to waste time downloading, but luckily we came acrossed a game called "The Big Mama," by Brenda Barnwell. The game is basically about a guy named Paul who gets dumped by his girlfriend and goes up and down the beach trying to figure out why he got dumped. There are vivid descriptions of everything from the parking lot to the way the beach looks, but Big Mama is still a mystery to me. Maybe Karissa discovered it because I certainly did it. I'm going to blog more when I get her response, but here's a preview based on the e-mail I sent her.

First, I was told without a blanket and a baby, I couldn't go "under the boardwalk." Next, "I don't understand that verb" popped up every time I typed "walk," "talk," etc. Then a lightbulb clicked and I realized, "Hey you gotta type in what direction you wanted to go." I typed in west and ended up in parking lots full of ashphalt. I never figured out why that girl and Paul broke up in the beginning did you? Anyway, a little sidetracked, but once I realized all I was looking at were a bunch of cars and wasn't meeting any drunks that might tell me about the break-up as promised, I headed towards the gee-dunks and learned about all the cool little shops, bars, and restaurants, but I still didn't meet any people.

Finally, I met a girl named Emily in a bikini that kept bending over, and I thought, "Oh no, is this going to be like San Andreas on X-box, where I'll have to be a purv and ask her for info on my ex, then take advantage of her?"

Alas, that was not the case. I said hi and asked if she was alone. She was flirty, but I remained a gentleman. I guess it's easier for us to do, since we are girls with brains. Then, it said I began a new phase of my life because I took a walk and held hands with Emily and that was it. I then went back to the game and tried a few more options to get different endings. When we played board games, the same thing happened. When I did say something suggestive, "You've been rejected!" was the ending. Basically, you can tell a woman wrote this game and I'm glad because I'm sick of games that exploit women.

Overall, I was kind of disappointed. While the descriptions were nice (the whole beach and the boardwalk), I couldn't seem to meet anyone but Emily. I was hoping to talk with some surfers, perhaps actually get to surf with Big Mama, and find out why "I" got dumped. I will say this game was much easier for me than the ones we played in class. The only one I could play was Galatea, so what do I know. Did you meet anyone cool? Did you succeed? Were your endings and results different? I'm looking forward to finding out! This was easy at least.

Posted by ErinWaite at 9:56 PM | Comments (0)

November 1, 2006

Chattin' up Galatea

As I've said before, Galatea was more about having a conversation than actually getting anywhere. She was like one of your lonely neighbors that keeps you talking for 5 hours about their cat or whatever, while meanwhile, your hands are full of groceries and you're late for work. She wasn't interested in much I had to say and it seemed like she was hoping for a man to rescue her from her "statueness" or something. This reminds me of the therapist because you just get alot of repeated questions from her. Thus, this wasn't my favorite game.

Posted by ErinWaite at 10:32 AM | Comments (2)

Photopia fun

This game was a contrast to the other game we've played so far, because this one changed on me every second. I kept getting stuck with "That verb isn't necessary" or there is no one around to talk to. It would also change from being on the road with my buddy Rob in one instance and then the next, I'd be on a spaceship, trying to figure out my mission. This game required more careful strategy, so it wasn't as quick as the others and involved actually playing the character yourself and using your own common sense.

Posted by ErinWaite at 10:26 AM | Comments (0)

October 30, 2006

Old-school gaming

I had fun trying to get through the phone booth game and 9:05 was really surprising. I am not good at modern computer games, so this was even a challenge. I really liked how you could pick your own endings. I think that these games force more specific thinking in general.

Posted by ErinWaite at 3:47 PM | Comments (0)

Only perverse people touch the velvet....

My first experience with interactive fiction was quite funny. Galatea and I got into a conversation about the black velvet around her and she said it was perverse to touch it, I was just being cheeky and I offeneded a statue. It was sort of creepy, I felt like I was in the mall talking to a mannequin or something and everyone would be giving me weird looks. It's hard to believe people would talk with the computer as if it were a therapist. At the same time, the really crappy ones on TV just paraphrase everything you say just like the computer anyway. The idea of typing your responses really makes you think about how well you articulate because one wrong phrase and bam! Game over!

Posted by ErinWaite at 3:39 PM | Comments (0)

October 24, 2006

My Experiences with Usability Testing

I had Shannon Moskal, who struggles with computer usag (like me) to review my site so that I could see the real problem areas that make it difficult to navigate. It would be easier for someone more professional to navigate it, so I thought why not start with a newbie. Next, I had my friend’s boyfriend Sean, who is a computer whiz (and not a huge Erin fan) check it out because I knew he’d be brutally honest and give me a complete list of ways to trouble-shoot. He certainly didn’t show any partiality and I realized what I already knew: I know jack about computers!! Next, I had the more sympathetic Janese (a grad from here) check it out and she enjoyed my enthusiasm and offered helpful tips too. Without more rambling, here are the questions for my own site.

1. Is there a strong enough focus, if so name it.

2. Are the links working and appropriate?

3. Are the pictures set up well enough and not too distracting?

4. What kind of audience am I aiming for and do you think my site would appeal to them?

5. What in summary, did you learn from visiting my site and was it what you were hoping to get out of it?

6. How long were you on my site and why?

Here are my problem areas:

Two of my links don’t work
My pictures are aligned well
My chunking and bolding is a little scattered, as I’m having trouble coming up with coding.
I don’t have as much content as needed.

Strengths

I changed my idea to favorite 80’s coming-of-age movies and everyone agreed that my thoughts are well-written and funny, I just need to work on layout.
My movies appeal to the right audience (college kids and adults alike with a soft spot for the big hair days).
I do have good pix and the links are appropriate.

I reviewed Rachel’s site and it offered great advice on entertainment, appealed to college students, and was informative, yet simple. Here are the answers to your questions. Great job Rach!

1. All the links were working and they are appropriate places.
2. The homepages offer enough info.
3. I’m 22, but for those under, you could include places like Dave and Buster’s, maybe suggest attending upcoming games and concerts, etc. Also mention up-and-coming restaurants. While we like to drink, I know like two people who don’t so make sure you include other non-alcoholic outings for more conservative people.
4. I’ve been dying to try the Tiki Lounge and maybe you could recommend some of your favorite drinks and food from these places and even where you can get good deals on parking or nights to go (Ladie’s Night,) etc. I’d like to know and I think it’d be cool if you get personal with your audience that way. You got me interested, so now I’ve got many questions (which is good).
5. 9. I’m always up for fun, but not knowing my way around Pittsburgh and being on a budget, I want to know where to park and how I can get the most bang for my buck.
My only suggestions would be:
-Add drinks and food you recommend, if you want.
-Suggest good days to go
-Maybe add some more pics, but your site is really good as it is! Pittsburgh here I come!

I haven’t gotten to formally peek at Cherie’s site, but based on my own questions and what I saw of her in-class exercises.

-Cherie writes with wit and humor.
-She knows her chunking and bolding
-She includes useful links that actually work
-The colors and style is appropriate to the content.
-To fix things up, she should add more links and pictures. She also needs to elaborate more. She has such great content and ideas that like Jeremy said, there needs to be more of them!

Posted by ErinWaite at 9:11 PM | Comments (2)

October 23, 2006

Watch out for Wikipedia errors

I felt so bad for the man whose name was slandered when he was referred to as Kennedy's assassin. I can't believe that a website that allows just anyone to publish whatever they want will not have some type of policy regarding users who slander others. It took days for the man's name to be removed. I think that whoever posted such a thing should be persecuted and while it may infringe on privacy rights, I think if you're going to put something out there tha high school students are going to be gullible enough to read and spread further, you should have to pay the consequences. I think that while Wikipedia is a good source for quick summaries of a book you're reading, I wouldn't use it for a final paper. I think there should be some type of disclaimer or warning on the homepage about the fact that anyone can publish anything and it could be wrong so that other resource cites and magazines can't complain about Wikipedia further.

Posted by ErinWaite at 2:30 PM | Comments (0)

October 22, 2006

Tog knows what he's talkin' about

I liked the format that he delivered his tips in. It was straight to the point and took two minutes for me to read and I benefited from it (maybe I can't spell, but still). I learned: The good points of someone's site should be stated first, the bulleted tips you give should be solutions, not criticisms, and to really pay attention to what kind of audience the author is aiming for. Tips are what we're looking for and Tog certainly delivered.

Posted by ErinWaite at 8:10 PM | Comments (2)

Prepping the Prototype

There come's a time when everything suddenly becomes overwhelming, the due dates are approaching at break-neck speed, and your brain's so full of miscellaneous info that you can't even remember what your car looks like in the parking lot. It' Midterm time! The usability testing article became so relevant because it offers good advice not only for testing a website, but how to approach testing yourself for anything. The 5 people seem like the right number because they are able to give you a diverse enough opinion. It's important for those people to be honest about your prototype because they will help you improve through criticism. You really shouldn't go through family because like we talked about in class, they will tell you they love everything you do. The prototype itself could be an outline for a test or a paper you're writing for midterm. It will help in trouble-shooting. I am having trouble just creating the prototype, let alone the website, but I think starting the writing or at least an outline for it will allow me to get some feedback and maybe point me in a clearer direction. The reading itself was quite helpful.

Posted by ErinWaite at 7:58 PM | Comments (4)

October 20, 2006

The Conduit Congo Line

To be honest and sound like a true blonde, I had no idea what a conduit was (or a meme). That's why I didn't blog about it. I was the girl who in middle school found a square package on the ferris wheel that said "fingerbowl" and thought it was some kind of condom, so don't be surprised at my lack of common sense. I make assumptions and I definitely made the wrong one about this. Its really been apart of what we are taught not to do in this college. We are not supposed to just spit back whatever information the professor gave us and expect an "A." At the same time, with all this lack of communication and this idea that we are supposed to just learn by doing doesn't allow students to really learn if they don't know specifically how to get started.
For instance, this morning, I was talking with other students who are having some of the same troubles as I am in posting their websites and even making them to begin with. While it's great that we're blogging and reading Castro's examples, then having discussions them as we attempt to workshop, where's the part where we can actually have someone who knows what they're doing SHOW us how, instead of just throwing us a handout or telling us to bug someone outside of class to show us when we're trying to do other homework already? We get hounded to Show and not Tell in every English class we've had since elementary school, so why is it stopping now? This applies to every course I'm taking in. I apologize for turning this into a rant, but this conduit thing made me think of a congo line. There is always someone who starts it and everyone who knows how to shake their rump join in. What about the people who aren't conduit congo people and but more like paper-writing polka fanatics? Okay, I've had too much Starbucks and none of this will make sense to anyone, but at least I made up for my first late blog. Sorry if you actually read this crap and thanks very much if you understand/agree with anything I just said.

Posted by ErinWaite at 2:23 PM | Comments (2)

October 17, 2006

Discussions, Digressions, and other Delights: Blog Portfolio

Hi, my name is Erin and I'm a blog-aholic. Well, not quite, but I got into some In-depth discussions with Karissa, Katie, Cherie, and Tiffany. I learned how to link and actually blogged daily and on-time. From in-class discussions I got some tasty entries about MySpace and Hot Text so grab a fork and dig in!

Coverage: Here are some of the blogs that I learned to concise, but still cover still fill the reader up in one trip. Kind of like a drive-thru, huh?
The Bush Blog
The Newbie Article
5 conventions
Painless Reading

Depth:For the main course, here's my most in-depth entries which stemmed from pet peeves and thus, made them more passionate and lead to longer entries.
Fiskers Beware!
A long September
I know what you're thinking
Dancing with Myself
Dead fish

Timeliness:
I'm never late for dessert and neither were any of my entries this year, but here are some of the ones that came out ahead of time.
Pre-historic e-mail
How many links
Get in/Get out
Website proposal
Blurbing it up
Spell it out for me

Discussion: How about some drinks and a little discussion? I got chatty and got great tips and opinions this year. I think I got more comments then last year's blog.
Castro Help
Ride that Hobbyhorse!
Oh, Navigator!
Give it to me straight
Revised proposal
5 conventions

Bonus: Comments Primo:
I was the first to comment on these blogs (click name and you'll get specific entries)
Rachel
Paul

Comments grande:
Rachel
Cherie


Posted by ErinWaite at 2:20 PM | Comments (2)

October 12, 2006

How many links does it take to get....?

Ch. 14 Pet Peeves: Here’s my interpretation of the tips, if you please.
"Express a few pet peeves. Indulge your hobbyhorses. You'll make a more dramatic impression and therefore do a better job of reporting." (375)

Be creative and have your own opinions, don’t just be a constipated news anchor

Stick with the href="http://http://jerz.setonhill.edu/writing/technical/reports/reports2.htm">pyramid it allows you to get to the point with some good hooks.

Quotes and interviews show bias and capture the essence a little more. Check out Tiffany’s blog on Ch. 14-16.

The audience wants to feel like your partner in crime a little, let them.

Don't be afraid to show a little bias
Ch. 15 Webzines rock
This part was great because while it encourages you to stay within limits it allows you to get even more personal. Hale said to go for the "...gonzo, the rough-edged, the over-the-top." (406)

While you are encouraged to stay within limits, free you to get even more personal.

• Hale said it best. Go for the “…gonzo, the rough-edged, the over-the-top

• They are a great way of getting feedback and showing off your unique opinions and quirks.

• Here are some links to some webzines that you may find interesting.
http://www.webzine.ws/http://speculativevision.com/network/Webzines/
Hunter S. Thompson may not have been webzine focused, he is a great example of going gonzo.

Christine Othitis wrote an article about gonzoism that really captures what Thompson started.
Want to learn more about him or re-live some of your favorite Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas Moments? Try these, kids :)
http://www.gonzo.org/
http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/story/6562575/fear_and_loathing_campaign_2004/
http://www.freezerbox.com/archive/article.php?id=287

• Here’s where you can start your own for free.www.crimsonzine.com/


Ch.16 Resumes are a part of growing up and faster to do online
“New opening new resume.” (423)
• Don’t use the same resume for every job.
• Tailor your resume to suit what position you are applying for.
• Similar lesson in Dr. Jerz’s previous class.
Sample resumes
• Looking for positions available in your field and area? Here are some good ideas.
Conclusion:
I enjoyed practicing linking techniques and the chunking and bolding. Hot Text is extremely helpful for people who don’t quite get the technical side right off the bat. Tiffany really found a great site on the link. It also brought up some interesting discussion between Karissa, Cherie, Tiffany, Katie, and I on my previous blog entry.
My Ch. 11-13 entry also has a lot of related information and comments on Hot Text.
Here are some blog entries that relate to mine.
Karissa's blog on ch.14-16 is great. Wait, her whole blog is.
Cherie's blogs always make me laugh and are ridiculously smart.
Tiffany's Ch. 14-16 gave me alot of insights.
Rachel is great at summing things up that I would never be able to.

Posted by ErinWaite at 4:00 PM | Comments (0)

October 10, 2006

Ride that hobbyhorse!

"Express a few pet peeves. Indulge your hobbyhorses. You'll make a more dramatic impression and therefore do a better job of reporting." (375)

I like this because it allows you to be creative and have your own opinions instead of looking like some constipated news anchor. This chapter sticks with the pyramid and encourages getting to the point with good hooks. Use quotes and give your audience clues in bias. I think this is great to because I like interviews and it captures the essence a little more. This ch. also reminds you to make the audience feel like your partners.

Ch. 15 on webzines was great because while it encourages you to stay within limits it allows you to get even more personal. Hale said to go for the "...gonzo, the rough-edged, the over-the-top." (406)

Ch. 16 "New opening, new resume." (423)
Yep. I definitely use the same old resume and that's bad news. This emphasized the importance of being tailored for the company. This reminds me of a previous Jerz class when we learned how to write resumes and Hot Text took it up a notch. I'm just happy I remember this stuff.

Posted by ErinWaite at 1:18 PM | Comments (5)

October 8, 2006

Give it to me straight

Ch. 11- "Writers don't start genres, audiences do." (273) I liked this quote because it explains that all genres start from people asking eachother questions and pretty soon a bunch of anwers that involve other forms of media come up and bam, you've got a genre. This chapter basically said: talk in terms appropriate to your audience, take on whatever persona is necessary, and make sure you adapt to forums. People are seeking answers and you're website should help them in an easy-to-follow manner.
Ch. 12 "You are not 'writing about' the site--you are annotating the interface." (286)" I've gone online and become frusturated easily by websites that don't offer basic instructions and field labeling before. It is awful when you can't order something since "error" keeps popping up and you are not informed "why." I thought the labeling fields part was particularly helpful, because a simple "Please enter month and day," is alot nicer than getting instructions that are barked at you and unclear to boot. It may be extra writing for you, but the audience needs examples and wants to know just why they have to jump through hoops so they are more likely to stick it out than just give up and go to another site.
Ch. 13 "...Straightforward information sells!" (343) I like this because it puts you on a more personal level than trying to push people to buy your product through scheming. Getting rid of the mission statement allows people to see right away that you aren't trying to b.s. them People visiting want to see pictures and testimonials from the average Joe letting them know the product is helpful. This ties in with Ch. 11 because it helps to adopt the right tone with whomever you're addressing so that they feel they can trust you enough to stay on the site and perhaps buy your product.

Posted by ErinWaite at 3:16 PM | Comments (4)

Oh, Navigator!

Where-o-where do I click to get out? My finger is blistering from clicking back, and look, now the page froze because I clicked so many times. It is nice to be able to have the basic links that allow you to to your original or home site, where to find more sources on the same topic, or at least a scroll bar that doesn't tease. At first I thought it was rather annoying that people are too lazy to scroll, but as an avid reader, when I feel the thickness of the book changing I know I'm making progress. As we discussed way before, online readers like to see the scroll bar changing quickly to let them know they're progressing too. Who wants to get trapped in a maze of a site when they just wanted to read about warlocks or cheese (whatever people do online for fun, I'm not sure) and get back to their chatroom?

Posted by ErinWaite at 2:14 PM | Comments (1)

Spell it out for me

Is that specific enough? By reading these chapters and looking at the examples, I was able to understand the importance of being literal enough that the reader can decide right away whether or not they want to continue reading something. Blurbs give good, short summaries that should allow readers to pick and choose also. Doing some of the exercises were tough for me because I'm still long-winded but I think I'm getting the hang of it. Cherie's been amazing help

Posted by ErinWaite at 2:08 PM | Comments (0)

Get in/Get out

I realized by reading this that you really have to mince words sometimes, which is good for me because I tend to be too wordy. When I'm out of context, it usually means I'm too wordy. In context writing allows more specificity and make it all-around easier for people to navigate your site. The reader is able to find exactly what they are looking for and if your titles and blurbs do not help they will get out faster than you can say 'poof! " This all continues to remind me of the good old pyramid.

Posted by ErinWaite at 2:01 PM | Comments (0)

October 3, 2006

Blurbing it up

I enjoyed reading about blurbs because it wasn't as overwhelming as I thought and it was broken down nicely. It reminded me of putting what's important first, not teasing the readers, and gave easy-to-follow examples. It's all about audience. Like Rachel said, it was nice to see the pyramid again.

Posted by ErinWaite at 8:57 PM | Comments (0)

Revised proposal

I love Rolling Stone magazine and the online version is quite fun and what I was going for. http://www.rollingstone.com/is what I'd like to base my ideas on, but not on such a large scale obviously. Just a few books, cds, movies, I like. www.metacritic.com was helpful too.

Posted by ErinWaite at 8:46 PM | Comments (1)

October 2, 2006

My Website proposal

I don't have the Net at home, so I really only visit websites with concert dates and reviews as well as book-related websites for pleasure. Besides that, I usually just use the web for school projects. I've actually already begun a website from last year regarding English education that might me useful. Could I enhance that and make it web-ready? If not, would it be feasible to do a website on books and music?

Posted by ErinWaite at 11:00 AM | Comments (1)

More Castro and Hot Text help

Both of these texts are helpful in creating a website, but I am still trouble-shooting and no one seems to be able to acttually "show" me what to do, so I'm tired of reading. Gina's brother is going to help us thankfully, so maybe I'll actually put the reading to use then.

Posted by ErinWaite at 10:57 AM | Comments (3)

September 29, 2006

Babbling Bush

“There is a growing mountain of research. But there is increased evidence that we are being bogged down today as specialization extends. The investigator is staggered by the findings and conclusions of thousands of other workers—conclusions which he cannot find time to grasp, much less to remember, as they appear.” (http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/194507/bush)

She could have just read Hot Text and shortened down this dense, boring crap to one sentence. Technology is helpful, but can bog us down because we have to take the time to re-learn everything. I was at first bogged down by blogs and now that I’ve cleared that hurtle, I’m on to tackling webpages. We are so fortunate to have such a great amount of technology to keep us efficient and up to speed, but sometimes, we get lost in the fray. The memex? Microfilms? Are these the latest developments? As technology develops will we have the capacity to memorize it and teach it to others? There is so much to absorb, that one day I do agree we may have chips implanted in our brains. If it helps us adapt, I’m all for it. If we are going to become more dependent on machines, maybe it’s not so great. What do you think?

Posted by ErinWaite at 10:16 AM | Comments (3)

September 26, 2006

Flopping like a dead fish when it comes to coding

Everything written about creating websites and the handy little pictures included make it sound so easy but I am with Kathleen when it comes to the general feeling of confusion and mild frustration. I am not the type of person to sit down and play on the computer until I get it. It's like math for me. I kind of need someone to sit down and actually show me instead of throwing more instructions in my face. I'm trying to read and keep up, but it's been rather unsuccessful thus far. I did enjoy reading about blurbs, but I really need a step-by-step tutorial, because I am getting nowhere. I think I'm at page 17. I created a website before, but this way is completely different. I'm sure once I finish the book, maybe I'll feel better. Until then, I'm flandering.

Posted by ErinWaite at 8:30 PM | Comments (0)

September 22, 2006

5 conventions

I like the simple wording and the fact Jerz says "frames suck," and that blinking things are bad. I learned alot because all of the things that people think are cool on websites are generally distracting. This helped me realize the importance of keeping people interested and giving them clear instructions so that they don't have to be frustrated with your site. These simplify Nielsen's tips even more and will help when we create our own sites.

Posted by ErinWaite at 4:29 PM | Comments (2)

September 20, 2006

I know what you're thinking...

Silberman's article just reminds me yet again, how important it is to speak well and not let yourself post what you don't want to "bite you in the ass" later. Yet, it still keeps happening. I would never judge someone because of what websites they go on to. Everyone goes through different stages whether they are "weird" or not, you need to get to know the real person and test their business skills before you hire or fire them. It seems that even more academic thinkers that might be involved in Usenet still stumble or get paranoid too. We have every reason to be paranoid because if we are putting out personal info, even if it's silly, someone else will use it against you.

Posted by ErinWaite at 4:27 PM | Comments (2)

I know what you're thinking...

Silberman's article just reminds me yet again, how important it is to speak well and not let yourself post what you don't want to "bite you in the ass" later. Yet, it still keeps happening. I would never judge someone because of what websites they go on to. Everyone goes through different stages whether they are "weird" or not, you need to get to know the real person and test their business skills before you hire or fire them. It seems that even more academic thinkers that might be involved in Usenet still stumble or get paranoid too. We have every reason to be paranoid because if we are putting out personal info, even if it's silly, someone else will use it against you.

Posted by ErinWaite at 4:27 PM | Comments (2)

The Newbie Article

This helped me understand the Eternal September a little more. I think it's funny to picture Dr. Jerz being a newbie and offending people accidentally by not putting in the appropriate smiley as I am now. I can actually blog now and not just vent though. I've noticed that alot of people still are just using their blogs as a slambook or a MySpace post where they just complain about everything that everyone else is doing. We all have opinions and debates are healthy, in fact i think I do better with a little opposition. I think Usenet sounds a little more personal (like gathering in someone's living room with some coffee to talk about a book you've read instead of a bunch of people talking dirty to 12 year olds in a chatroom about Beanie Babies, so maybe since I'm old school, I would've had fun with Usenet as I galloped through their parlor and knocked over vases as a newbie.

Posted by ErinWaite at 4:19 PM | Comments (5)

The Newbie Article

This helped me understand the Eternal September a little more. I think it's funny to picture Dr. Jerz being a newbie and offending people accidentally by not putting in the appropriate smiley as I am now. I can actually blog now and not just vent though. I've noticed that alot of people still are just using their blogs as a slambook or a MySpace post where they just complain about everything that everyone else is doing. We all have opinions and debates are healthy, in fact i think I do better with a little opposition. I think Usenet sounds a little more personal (like gathering in someone's living room with some coffee to talk about a book you've read instead of a bunch of people talking dirty to 12 year olds in a chatroom about Beanie Babies, so maybe since I'm old school, I would've had fun with Usenet as I galloped through their parlor and knocked over vases as a newbie.

Posted by ErinWaite at 4:19 PM | Comments (5)

September 19, 2006

"Dancing with MySelf on MySpace"

"People were hanging out on Friendster before they hung out on MySpace. But hanging out on Friendster is like hanging out in a super clean police state where you can't chew gum let alone goof around and you're told exactly how to speak to others. Hanging out on MySpace is more like hanging out in a graffiti park with fellow goofballs while your favorite band is playing. That said, there are plenty of folks who don't want to be hanging out in a graffiti park and they are not sticking around on MySpace as a result." http://www.danah.org/papers/FriendsterMySpaceEssay.html
I do agree that as long as kids who maybe aren't sure of who they really are or whose parents don't support them
going out on the town (computers are apparently a better sitter) MySpace will flourish. I love the quotes about people dancing with eachother via webcam. Whatever happened to hanging at the park or as Paul mentioned at Mcdonalds? At least there was real interaction. Friendster sounded more of a singles bar by comparison. Kids need more places to hang out and I think MySpace sounds at least a little less like a meat market, but things change.

Posted by ErinWaite at 8:21 PM | Comments (0)

"Dancing with MySelf on MySpace"

"People were hanging out on Friendster before they hung out on MySpace. But hanging out on Friendster is like hanging out in a super clean police state where you can't chew gum let alone goof around and you're told exactly how to speak to others. Hanging out on MySpace is more like hanging out in a graffiti park with fellow goofballs while your favorite band is playing. That said, there are plenty of folks who don't want to be hanging out in a graffiti park and they are not sticking around on MySpace as a result." http://www.danah.org/papers/FriendsterMySpaceEssay.html
I do agree that as long as kids who maybe aren't sure of who they really are or whose parents don't support them
going out on the town (computers are apparently a better sitter) MySpace will flourish. I love the quotes about people dancing with eachother via webcam. Whatever happened to hanging at the park or as Paul mentioned at Mcdonalds? At least there was real interaction. Friendster sounded more of a singles bar by comparison. Kids need more places to hang out and I think MySpace sounds at least a little less like a meat market, but things change.

Posted by ErinWaite at 8:21 PM | Comments (0)

September 15, 2006

Castro: A big help

In chapter 1, there are many helpful pictures, but I still seem to be struggling. I can't even get my webpage to come up. I am hoping that maybe the more experienced could be partnered up with the more experienced so that pehaps we could catch up. The format is attention-getting. The steps are simple enough, just actually following them is a different manner. Am I missing something? What are your thoughts?

Posted by ErinWaite at 12:57 PM | Comments (2)

September 14, 2006

E-mails open to interpretation

Enemark explains very well why e-mails are hard to interpret. We can’t see facial expressions, but if it’s ALL CAPS, SOMEONE ISN’T HAPPY. There are emoticons that make you either more confused or take quite literally ;) It is very easily to be careless on them. I’ve misspelled many words and said something completely insulting and inaccurate millions of times without even knowing it and luckily I have other people who struggle as well and are not offended. I’ve learned the basic structure of writing business letters, but I am still trying to learn the social graces involved in e-mailing. Maybe exercise 3 will help me.

Posted by ErinWaite at 9:57 PM | Comments (0)

September 12, 2006

Professors are just as bad...

Sure, this woman has a right to be offended, but if she was so upset, she could have tried to pehaps talk with the president or someone else in the school. By firing back, she is showing them that she really is what they say she is and shows that she is not mature or professional enough to handle such a job.

Posted by ErinWaite at 8:14 PM | Comments (0)

Atttack of the impulse e-mailers!

Agenda item: We should have some common sense!
I was shocked by how rude and personal students could get. I can't believe they would actually tell a professor that they were busy drinking or that they were spending too much time on "moron" students. It all goes back to etiquette and manners. Here's my rule: If you wouldn't say it to the professor in the class, why send a low-blow of an e-mail. It makes me think of how in kindergarten, I was bewildered to see my teacher wearing stretch pants and buying toilet paper because she didn't live in the school! That's how adults are acting now. We all need to realize that just as we don't feel like reading drafts of essays all day, neither do our teachers. At the same time, it is nice to be able to ask questions on a higher level that maybe there wasn't enough time to in class. After all, the professors are paid and we do have to buy books, so we deserve to get the most of our learning. Like any privelage, we need to learn to respect and appreciate it. I think it's great that teachers are laying down ground rules for e-mail, but we should already know the rules.

Posted by ErinWaite at 7:48 PM | Comments (2)

Atttack of the impulse e-mailers!

Agenda item: We should have some common sense!
I was shocked by how rude and personal students could get. I can't believe they would actually tell a professor that they were busy drinking or that they were spending too much time on "moron" students. It all goes back to etiquette and manners. Here's my rule: If you wouldn't say it to the professor in the class, why send a low-blow of an e-mail. It makes me think of how in kindergarten, I was bewildered to see my teacher wearing stretch pants and buying toilet paper because she didn't live in the school! That's how adults are acting now. We all need to realize that just as we don't feel like reading drafts of essays all day, neither do our teachers. At the same time, it is nice to be able to ask questions on a higher level that maybe there wasn't enough time to in class. After all, the professors are paid and we do have to buy books, so we deserve to get the most of our learning. Like any privelage, we need to learn to respect and appreciate it. I think it's great that teachers are laying down ground rules for e-mail, but we should already know the rules.

Posted by ErinWaite at 7:48 PM | Comments (2)

September 11, 2006

Is Bess still on the prowl?/MySpace minder and Danger Zone

I knew there are Internet predators, but I had no idea to what degree they were after children. While I think kids need to explore in order to learn the right way to behave online and in general, but I think it's important for parents to mind what they are looking at every now and then because it would be so easy for a predator to come to the house or worse. While I hated that stupid Bess in school that would come up in middle school every time I typed in random phrases like peanut butter and got kicked off, I'm kind of glad. While we are constantly looking up statistics about people being murdered, do we really want to be apart of those statistics?

Posted by ErinWaite at 10:09 AM | Comments (3)

September 6, 2006

"Hooray for Hindu Gurus"

“Nate Kushner: Yeah, that;s something we can talk about.
Laura K. Krishna: lets talk about it then
Nate Kushner: As long as you understand that plagiarism is not going to free you from the painful cycle of death and rebirth any quicker.
Laura K. Krishna: ok
Laura K. Krishna: so can u help me
Nate Kushner: I think I can. It is my duty, as we are all children in the arms of Chivas.”

“ A Week Of Kindness”
http://www.aweekofkindness.com/blog/archives/the_laura_k_krishna_saga/000023.html

This was definitely my favorite part of the blog entry. I love that he’s bluntly messing with her and she doesn’t seem to notice. Money is not an issue obviously if she’s been on the Dean’s List before because someone like that has probably done this numbers of times without a backlash. I’m embarrassed, but I’ll admit I asked a friend to write a story for me in 8th grade about some horrible topic like teen love and Burger King (a topic we had to pull out of a hat) and when I read how awful it was, I paid her but ended up trashing it and turning in my own completely different story. I never plaigiarized, but that gave me a taste of how pointless it is. I have received e-mails and comments on my blog correcting mistakes I had intentionally made and some from a few yuppies asking me to write their term papers on Mad Cow disease, etc., but I never would have thought of pulling a Nate Kushner. I also love the part about how she actually used a camera phone to show him she wrote the check. She spent more hours talking to him about the transaction than she would have had to on just writing the paper herself. It goes to show that while technology is a great tool, people who abuse end up wasting their time and in a world of trouble. I do feel sorry for this girl for being so gullible, though. Do you think if he would’ve told her to write it herself she would have or would she just bought another one?

Posted by ErinWaite at 1:30 PM | Comments (3)