March 26, 2007

No Clue

Berger, Postmortem for a Postmodernist -- Jerz EL312 (Literary Criticism)

I was very excited to be reading this book because I thought that it would be a light read, but it was anything but. I realize that this book is trying to explain postmodernism and the views of this theory, and Berger failed terribly at trying to reach this goal. Every character had a different theory and reasoning and each thought the others were foolish for following any other theory besides theirs.

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Primitivism

Murfin and Ray, Bedford Glossary of Critical and Literary Terms -- Jerz EL312 (Literary Criticism)

Primitivism - a doctrine postulating that, although humans are essentially good, they have been (and are still being) corrupted by 'civilization.'

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Excuse Me?

Derrida, ''Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences'' -- Jerz EL312 (Literary Criticism)

"Thus there are two interpretations of interpretation, of structure, of sign, of freeplay. The one seeks to decipher, dreams of deciphering, a truth or an orgin which is free from freeplay and from the order of the sign, and lives like an exile with the necessity of interpretation. The other, which is no longer turned toward the orgin, affirms freeplay and tries to pass beyond man and humanism, the name man being the name of that being who, throughout the history of metaphysics or of ontotheology- in other words, through the history of all the history - has dreamed of full presence, the reassuring foundation, the orgin and the end of game" (362).

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Derrida, ''Structure, Sign and Play in the Discourse of the Human Sciences'' -- Jerz EL312 (Literary Criticism)

"There are thus two interpretations of interpretation, of structure, of sign, of freeplay. The one seeks to decipher, dreams of deciphering, a thruth or an orgin which is free from freeplay and from the order of the sign, and lives like an exile with the necessity of interpretation. The other, which is no longer turned toward the orgin, affirms freeplay and tries to pass beyond man and humanism, the name man being the name that being who, throughout the history of metaphysics or ontotheology --in other words, through the history of metaphysics or ontotheology- in other words, through the history of all his history -- has dreamed full presence, the reassuring foundation, the orgin and the end of the game" (362).


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More Theories...

Keesey, Ch 6 (Introduction) -- Jerz EL312 (Literary Criticism)

Kessey addressed all of the previous arguments that he and the previous critics had made, including all of the theories. He then went on and examined each individual theory and noted the reasons why those theories work and do not work. For example, he would go into detail as to why the intertextual critics would disagree with something that he stated...he would say where they had valid points of skepticism and gave them credit when they proved a valid argument.

I also learned alot about Derrida, who is a French philosopher. The mention of Derrida was interesting because I was able to get a summary of who he was and what his beliefs were before I read his essay.

"By subjecting 'philosophical' texts to careful, formal analysis, Derrida seeks to show that there is no such language" (346).

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So what do you think?

Wright, ''The New Psychoanalysis and Literary Criticism'' -- Jerz EL312 (Literary Criticism)

"People are hostile to psychoanalytic theory because they alreayd have theories on how families work and have learned to rely on the quotation use of such terms as father, mother and child" (399).

The passage above is when Wright stepped out of her essay and stated a simple, realistic fact. This is one of the few times in her essay that I felt she was not throwing around text from other stories and using other examples to back up her claims.

I finally was able to understand her argument when she changed her tone in the essay and no longer spoke like a critic, but rather a real person. Her claim is great, yes it is useful to look deeper in the text and try to see patterns which lie hidden underneath the text.

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March 20, 2007

Blade Runner

Well first off, I thought that it was very interesting to see how the creators of Blade Runner imagined how the world would be in 2017. It was simply fascinating to watch because the year 2017 is right around the corner for people living in today's society.

Blade Runner was a very popular movie when it came out and I can understand the reason for it being so. I would have never choose this movie to watch, but I am glad that it was the movie chosen for this course. It tied in perfectly with Freud's theories and it held my attention throughout the whole movie.

Blade Runner's ending was a typical, normal happy ending with the viewer having very few questions at the end. One of those questions would be, "Did she ever die?" or "What happened to them once they left the house?"

The reason for us watching this movie was to compare it to Freud's essay "The Uncanny". And yes, I had experienced many, many uncanny feelings throughout this movie. I did not know why their were all of those Asians in LA and I did not know how Blade Runner knew the difference between humans and replicants. I also experienced uncanny feelings when Prue was invited into Sebastian's house because of the way that she acted.

And the list of uncanny moments in Blade Runner could go on forever...

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March 19, 2007

Chilling Thoughts

Freud is an interesting person. His theory does makes sense to some degree, but falls apart when people in today's society question the validity of his theory because of the issues that are present in today's world, which were unheard of in the year of 1919. For example, two women raising a child. His theory pretty much falls apart and looses all credibility.

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March 12, 2007

Honesty

Swann, ''Whodunnit? Or, Who Did What? 'Benito Cereno' and the Politics of Narrative Structure'' -- Jerz EL312 (Literary Criticism)

I don't want to claim that this is an entirely original point, nor that calling, "Bentio Cereno" a mystery story in this semi-techincal sense offers a final solution to the difficultis of the tale. I do want to argue that a recognition og the importance of narrative form and literary genre will atleast improve our definitions of the complexities that confront the reader, and will help us to see how the story relates to the history and politics that t springs from and is so deeply about." (311)

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Understanding Shakespeare

Frye, ''Shakespeare's The Tempest'' -- Jerz EL312 (Literary Criticism)


"In Sakespeare's day magic and science werevery imperfectly seperated, and today, in a postscienific age when they seem to be coming together again, the magus figure has revived into contemporary fiction, with much the same dreams attached to it. (305)

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Another Way...

Culler, ''Structuralism and Literature'' -- Jerz EL312 (Literary Criticism)

"Yesterday I
Went into town and bought
A lamp.

The words remain the same, and if meanings change it is because we approach the poem with different expectations and interpretative operations" (290).


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Meanings

Frye, ''The Critical Path'' -- Jerz EL312 (Literary Criticism)


"If we tire of the shadow-play explaining real poems by assumed mental states, we may be driven to realize that the ultimate source of a poem is not so much the individual poet as the social situation he springs, and of which he is the spokesman and the medium." (281)

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Importance of Words

Keesey, Ch 5 (Introduction) -- Jerz EL312 (Literary Criticism)


"A poem is best read in the light of all the other poems ever written. We read A the better to read B (we have to start somewhere; we may get very little out of A). We read B the better to read C, C the better to read D, D the better to go back and get something out of A. Progress is not aim, but circulation. The thing is to get among the poems where tehy hold each other apart in their places as the stars do" (Selected Prose, New York, 1966, pp. 96-97).

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