Breaking the Mold

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“Here murder has somehow become part of the everyday life.” (90)

 

Linnet Myers’ “Humanity On Trial” introduces to our class something we’ve only touched briefly upon before: the world of feature writing.  I really enjoyed reading Myers’ article, well enjoyed it to a point at least --  I think that the article was exquisitely written but frightening and disturbing at the same time because she conveyed such horrible crimes and described them in such grotesque detail.

 

However, I think crime was an interesting subject to focus on when writing her feature.  Usually I would think of “feature” stories as happy stories, stories that may even border on cheesy or fluffy.  Myers’ use of a feature story, in contrast to my preconceived thoughts, brought to life a painful reality of crime that is often sterilized through short, informational crime reports.  Also, the feature style made it appropriate for her to focus on only one or two sources - the judges - as well as her own experiences and insights, both of which would be completely inappropriate if writing a more hard-news story on crime.

 

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6 Comments

Chelsea said:

Wow, I'm dumb, this was a feature article. Thanks for pointing out the obvious, my whole blog is about how I didn't think we were supposed to write this way.

Anyway, I'm glad that you thought this was a little much too. I mean I can watch Saw and think that it's really cool, but hearing bout crime against real people kind of makes me sick, and she def. went into detail with it here.

Maddie Gillespie said:

I agree with you wholeheartedly in that this story was a good feature article, but kinda scary too. It would have been too long for an up and up crime story. You made a good point when you said that this feature was completely different than the typically pictured feature.

Maddie Gillespie said:

I agree with you wholeheartedly in that this story was a good feature article, but kinda scary too. It would have been too long for an up and up crime story. You made a good point when you said that this feature was completely different than the typically pictured feature.

Tiffany Gilbert said:

I agree with the feature article being cheesy and full of fluff. I have never read a crime article like this that was a feature. However, it does have 3 sources, so is that what makes it a feature article?

haha

Tiffany Gilbert said:

I agree with the feature article being cheesy and full of fluff. I have never read a crime article like this that was a feature. However, it does have 3 sources, so is that what makes it a feature article?

haha

Because the emphasis of this article is on human interest -- something that there's rarely time to do when you're writing for deadline -- the "news" simply becomes sharing with the reader a fuller understanding of how crime impacts many people in the community, even weeks or months after the crime has been committed. If you like this style of writing, I encourage you to consider taking magazine writing. Dr. McClain has loads of experience in professional writing, including fiction and essays, so she's a great asset to the journalism program.

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Dennis G. Jerz on Breaking the Mold: Because the emphasis of this a
Tiffany Gilbert on Breaking the Mold: I agree with the feature artic
Tiffany Gilbert on Breaking the Mold: I agree with the feature artic
Maddie Gillespie on Breaking the Mold: I agree with you wholeheartedl
Maddie Gillespie on Breaking the Mold: I agree with you wholeheartedl
Chelsea on Breaking the Mold: Wow, I'm dumb, this was a feat