November 30, 2005

November 29th Edition Tribune Review

The article that I found was called "Public school is first in New Orleans to reopen since Katrina." I was looking for something that could be considered a feature article, and because that article dealt with human interest, I was intrigued to focus my paper off of it.

First off, what can we say about Katrina? One of the most (if not the most) detrimental natural disasters the United States has ever seen. I know that this does not necessarily make this a feature article, but because this is a regrouping of an entire city, makes this a feature. The human interest of this article is beyond imaginable, and the effort made to put this school back together is amazing.

I tried to compare this to my feature article, but I really couldn't except for the fact that the Holocaust and Hurricane Katrina both caused serious damage that are bringing people together today. I think that the NCCHE is doing exactly what the people of New Orleans are trying to do: REBUILD. One is physical, and one is more emotional, but both are absolutely crucial to change. I am really glad that I found this article, and I think that the author, Janet Guttsman, did an incredible job of bringing us that news.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 10:34 PM | Comments (5)

November 28, 2005

We The Media Chapter 12

"Blogs and other modern media are feedback systems. They
work in something close to real time and capture—in the best
sense of the word—the multitude of ideas and realities each of
us can offer. On the Internet, we are defined by what we know
and share. Now, for the first time in history, the feedback
system can be global and nearly instantaneous" (Gillmor 237).

I could not agree more Mr. Gillmor. I think that we do share ideas. I do like the idea of feedback. I believe that feedback is what makes us the writers that we are meant to be. How we take criticism of our ideas, creates stronger individuals. I admire that statement that Gillmor wrote there, and it will stick with me after I leave.

As for online news, I do have a respect for it. It has many good concepts to offer. However, it is still filled with many flaws, and for that, I am sticking with my newspaper. Surprisingly, I don't think that I am going to leave the blogosphere, because I think it does a lot of good, especially in the feedback category. Blogs seem to represent not only how we feel, but who we are. Let me elaborate. If I write something on a news story that I take to heart, it has now affected me personally, and it doesn't only reveal my feelings, it reveals my morals, my ideas, and my personal experiences with that topic. I think that is absolutely necessary for a person to grow.

At the same time, I think that Blogs are good for creating ideas and reflections academically as well. Creating analyses, syntheses, and other forms of 'es' lol is really good for bringing out scholarly ideas. I think that blogs are necessary in certain situations, as long as they are not pushed too hard. People should be able to blog at their own leisure (which they do TO AN EXTENT). I think that I will have better blogs when I am not pressured to do one as an assignment. Blogs are necessary in general for the creation of ideas.

But not news stories. Leave them to the newspapers, they get paid to do them, and they do their jobs particularly well. Do me a favor, and don't take the IANS book to heart. Anyone who creates arguments through card-stacking really is just out there to attack the other party. Journalists do solid work, and they work their hardest to make sure that stories are accurate and precise. Sometimes with time constraints, the story is not always great and riveting, but it is informational nonetheless.

That's it for me everybody. We The Media is a good book, and Gillmor has some very good points, but he just hasn't made a true believer out of me.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 06:33 PM | Comments (2)

We The Media Chapter 9

"Nothing, in a journalistic sense, justifies blatant deception.
But the line between improper doctoring and making an image
better is less clear than we might like. For example, simple cropping
can remove someone who was in the original picture or it
can highlight an important element in the image" (Gillmor 177).

Wow. Gillmor just proved my original point as to why print journalism is more reliable. I do realize that there are good online news sources, but as he said, deception is never an excuse. I'm not saying that it has never happened in print journalism either. But it seems that those journalists are either crazy or simply just misinformed (which once again, it is no excuse). The overall point is that it is obviously more likely to find deception on an online media journalism page, then on a print journalism page.

Right now, I am still playing "devil's advocate" because I still am really skeptical about online journalism. I think that there are many good things to offer through blogs and other news sources. At the same time, there are still many flaws that are occurring through there online sources that we as the consumers can simply not trust. The picture with Senator Kerry and Jane Fonda is one of those situations that could possibly be considered libel, which in turn that person would be burned at the stake (not really). If that occurred in a newspaper, people would be getting fired left and right, including the writer of the article, and the editor who let that happened.

In conclusion, I am still not sure what to believe. I think that blogs should be left for opinions and well written essays or reflections. Don't leave the news to the blogs. I think tradition has worked for a really long time, and it should really stay that way. Stick to "The Onion;" it works.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 06:23 PM | Comments (2)

We The Media Chapter 6

"We are hearing new voices - not necessarily the voices of people who want to make a living by speaking out, but who want to say what they think and be heard, even if only by relatively few people." (Gillmor 139).

This quote was in the Citizen Journalist: Bloggers (and more) Everywhere section, focusing on the discussion of New Media, especially Blogging, in a more advanced society. We have the privelege of the First Amendment to help us with our journalism capabilities, and with that, comes effective writing. It is good to know that I, Jason Pugh (lol), can report the news at any time. What I also find somewhat relieving is that accuracy is still important, although not necessarily mandatory to online journalism. Consequences could occur, which is very good to know, if someone does not report ideas, news, or anything else accurately.

Another important idea to online journalism, is feedback. Instead of waiting for an editor's opinion, forums can receive feedback immediately. If someone is wrong, so many others can report the accurate information. Although it makes you look like a fool, the correct information is now out into the mainstream.

One more thing, who would have thought that Wikipedia could actually be a reliable source. Anything inaccurate is filtered through and taken off, so the correct info is published on the webpage for the people, by the people. I find this to be very interesting, and it is good to know that the filtering process is occurring. "Wikipedia draws strength from its volunteers who catch and fix every act of online vandalism" (Gillmor 149). GOOD.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 04:16 PM | Comments (2)

We The Media Chapter 4

"Newsmakers of all kinds - corporate, political, and I'd argue, journalistic - need to listen harder, and in new ways, to constiuents of all kinds, whether the voters, customers, or the general public." (Gillmor 68).

Well, this shocks me. A man not card-stacking his argument, but rather exposing the flaws to what he is arguing for. That is mighty impressive I must say. Sorry to switch to American Lit, but I learned that in order to create a solid argument, one must find the argument posing against it, and make it evident to the person/people reading it. I couldn't agree mor (get it!) that journalists must find ways to actually listen to the people, because they are the ones reporting the news. The customers that read and buy the papers deserve that much from a reporter. Everyone must consider accuracy when they speak, because no one gets respect from "bs'ing" their way through important details.

Before I go, I must say that this book is completely different from the other book that we have previously read. Unlike the method of card-stacking (using 9 examples to prove one point), this book exposes its flaws, which I find to be more believable, and way more interesting. I really feel that this book is somewhat changing my opinion, although I am still not a full believer of online journalist quite yet. I have not read really anything from this book that tells me or shows me that online journalism is more reliable than print journalism. I said before that the risks of being wrong are much higher in the print world than the online world, and anyone can type something in online journalism. I guess I'm still a skeptic. What about you?

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 04:02 PM | Comments (4)

We The Media Chapter 1

Chapter 1 of We The Media has really left me at a torn stage of what I think about journalism. It is obvious that personal journalism is effective to spreading the news, but it is also effective in creating opinions which people might actually feel to be true news. Journalism is a business in today's society, and one quote that I did find effective was on Page 8 when Gillmor wrote "Personal technology wasn't just about going online. It was about the creation of media in new and, crucially, less expensive ways (Gillmor 8).

It is clearly obvious that the amount of money spent in print journalism, as well as TV journalism is very high. So yes, online journalism is very inexpensive. But is it really reliable? Look at how many people create their own news, and in some cases, they don't get it right. What are we to do then? I think that print journalism, though more expensive is much more reliable because jobs are at stake if they mess up. There is LESS ROOM for error, which means more accurate reporting. I really think that I am just not trusting online journalism right now, although I am finding good qualities that it possesses.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 03:52 PM | Comments (0)

November 14, 2005

Booker T. Washington

"It was only a few years before that time that any white man in the audience might have claimed me as his slave; and it was easily possible that some of my former owners might be present to hear me speak." (XIII).

Wow. What a transition between Uncle Remus, and Booker T. Washington. The differences between these two people are just unreal. Washington noticed the two different time periods, because he was a slave, and he could relate to Jim (if he were real). What a monumental biography that clearly screams "rags to riches". I love these kinds of stories, just because of the hard work that is involved with them. Booker T. Washington worked his way up from a slave, to one of the first educated African-Americans ever. One thing that I noticed is the title that Booker T. Washington was given: The Negro Educator. That title is so good and so bad at the same time. He shouldn't have had to have a title like this, but the fact that he is a representative of all African-Americans in that time period is just astounding. I absolutely love this transition of Jim and Uncle Remus, to Washington.

Another comparison I think I could make to Booker T. Washington is a man named Martin Luther King Jr. Both of these men have incredible leadership skills, and are both very educated. They also stand strictly for equality. I think Martin Luther King was a little bit more outspoken, but both were really trying to get their messages across. They were both willing to face many challenges to make their messages clear. Washington had to travel from Boston to Atlanta, to give an amazing five minute speech to trying passing a bill, that actually got passed a few days later. This man, although he is, should never again be viewed as a black man, but strictly as an infleuntial man who had big dreams and followed through with them.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 10:53 PM | Comments (5)

American Lit. Blog Portfolio II

The following portfolio consists of all the blogging that I have done over the past five to six weeks. I hope you enjoy the collection, because there is good critical analyses in these entries. Here is the Portfolio:


Weblogs

Coverage - The Essence of Solitude in Walden
The Hopelessness of the Raven
To Science and Silence
Part I Emily Dickinson
Part II Emily Dickinson
Introduction and Critiques to AHF
Huck Finn Finale
Why the What?
Huck Finn (Chapters 1 - 24)
John Henry Selections


Depth - The Essence of Solitude in Walden
The Hopelessness of the Raven
To Science and Silence
Part II Emily Dickinson
Huck Finn Finale
Huck Finn (Chapters 1 - 24)
John Henry Selections


Timeliness - The Essence of Solitude in Walden
The Hopelessness of the Raven
To Science and Silence
Part I Emily Dickinson
Part II Emily Dickinson
Introduction and Critiques to AHF
Huck Finn Finale
Why the What?


Interaction - The Essence of Solitude in Walden
The Hopelessness of the Raven
To Science and Silence
Part II Emily Dickinson
Huck Finn Finale
Why the What?


Discussion - The Essence of Solitude in Walden
The Hopelessness of the Raven
To Science and Silence
Huck Finn Finale


Xenoblogging

Lauren Etling (2) - And In Conclusion
Ah, Simple Simplicity
Vanessa Kolberg (2) - Poe Poems
Conclusion
Stacy Estatico (2) - Huckleberry Finn Intro.
Huck Finn
Lou Gagliardi - Maturation and the Final Chapter
Ashley Holtzer - Why the Negro is Black
Meredith Harber - Huck Finn Huzzah
Valerie Masciarelli - Get Off My Bust Darn You!
Michelle Koss - Huckleberry Finn 24 - Finish
Meredith Benson - John Henry


Wildcard

This entry could have been placed underneath the top category, but I took a different approach, which is why this is going to be my Wildcard. Instead of discussing the Chapters of Walden, I decided to bring up the idea of transition through analysis in our class. In the beginning, we did so much character analysis. At this stage in the class, we completely shifted into a new way of analysis. These reasons are why this is my Wildcard.

This is What I WOULD Talk About

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 12:59 PM | Comments (0)

November 13, 2005

Huck Finn (Chapters 1 - 24)

"Tom he made a sign to me -- kind of a little noise with his mouth -- and we went creeping away on our hands and knees. When we was ten foot off Tom whispered to me, and wanted to tie Jim to the tree for fun. But I said no; he might wake and make a disturbance, and then they'd find out I warn't in." (Chapter 2).

Huckleberry Finn has some key elements of foreshadowing concerning the way that "niggers" were treated in the mid to late 1800's. Twain is blatantly obvious when he shows us this passage, that Jim is going to be treated this way throughout the entire novel. What is also evident, is Huckleberry Finn is going to be a main protagonist in this book. In Chapter 2, he is already sticking up for Jim, and in later chapters, he shows heroic qualities that help Jim out. Some have said that Jim is more or less the father that Huck never had (although he had Pap, but he was a drunk). In the earlier chapters, we don't see this quality of Jim quite yet. There is a subplot brewing between Jim and his problems, while the plot right now is Huckleberry Finn and his escape with a "nigger".

This book has so many issue with the society involved, that I have no idea why Mark Twain was not assassinated. If a white man wrote something like this in the pre-Civil War era, I could see nothing but death in this man's future. Maybe since blacks were free in Twain's time period, that there was some release of pressure.

One quality that I love is the observance of Huckleberry Finn. Twain is clearly doing more showing than telling in this book, and Huckleberry Finn is that character that portrays a view of society that has always been present, but has never been spoken of. The travels of Huckleberry Finn has each taught us the way that people are viewed as they keep heading down the Mississippi River.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 12:01 PM | Comments (0)

John Henry Selections

"John Henry was hammering on the right side,
The big steam drill on the left
Before that steam drill could beat him down,
He hammered his fool self to death."

John Henry is truly one of my favorite tall tales. None of the other ones have a real representation of the life that the people led in the time period. John Henry represented all men that worked as hard as they could, simply to be replaced by a machine because the business was more efficient that way. I absoultely can't stand when they say "he hammered his fool self to death," because he wasn't a fool at all. Sure he carried hubris, or an excessive amount of pride, but isn't that usually all qualities that tragic HERO's possess? As much as I love this tall tale, it bothers me just as much. The fact of how unappreciative the captain was of this man is just ridiculous. The man is a giant for pete's sake! And he does incredible work, but it doesn't matter. And so goes the industrial society working its way in.

A while ago, we read Walt Whitman's "I Hear America Singing." What a happy poem that was, with such patriotism with the different kind of workers. I don't see John Henry in there for 2 reasons, A) because no one was appreciative of the work he had to put in day in and day out, and B) because he's dead (of course) :P. Seriously though, this poem can reflect the time period that we live in. Machines and other inventions replace people, and sadly enough, that's just the honest truth. I know that you all have something to say about this man, so let me hear it.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 11:41 AM | Comments (0)

November 10, 2005

Blog Portfolio THREE

Here is a collection of blog entries that I have written over the past 3 weeks. They consist of many that are considered coverage, a good amount that are depth, a good bit that are considered timeliness, and a select few that are considered as discussion and interaction. For comments, there is a solid amount of comment primo's this time (5). And I have seemed to find more blogmates out there to communicate with. There is also a wildcard blog about how important a break can really be. I hope you enjoy the following weblog entries and comments:


Weblog Entries


Coverage: Covering Crime and Justice
Peter Peter the Spousal Abuser!
Briefing on Media Law
Chapter 11 AP Guide to Newswriting
It Ain't Necessarily So Introduction
Chapters 2 and 3: It Ain't Necessarily So
It Ain't Necessarily So (Ch 4 and 5)
It Ain't Necessarily So (Ch. 6 & 7)
IANS Chapter 8 & 9
It Ain't Necessarily So Conclusion
November 8th Edition of the Tribune Review


Depth: Covering Crime and Justice
Briefing on Media Law
Chapter 11 AP Guide to Newswriting
Chapters 2 and 3: It Ain't Necessarily So
It Ain't Necessarily So (Ch 4 and 5)
It Ain't Necessarily So (Ch. 6 & 7)
It Ain't Necessarily So Conclusion
November 8th Edition of the Tribune Review


Timeliness: Covering Crime and Justice
Peter Peter the Spousal Abuser!
Briefing on Media Law
Chapter 11 AP Guide to Newswriting
Chapters 2 and 3: It Ain't Necessarily So
It Ain't Necessarily So (Ch 4 and 5)
It Ain't Necessarily So (Ch. 6 & 7)


Interaction: Covering Crime and Justice
Chapter 11 AP Guide to Newswriting
Chapters 2 and 3: It Ain't Necessarily So
It Ain't Necessarily So (Ch 4 and 5)
It Ain't Necessarily So (Ch. 6 & 7)

Discussion: Chapters 2 and 3: It Ain't Necessarily So
It Ain't Necessarily So (Ch 4 and 5)
It Ain't Necessarily So (Ch. 6 & 7)


Xenoblogging


The Comment Primo: Christopher Ulicne - Take Your Own Advice
Lorin Schumacher - Darn Activists, I Just Wanna Live!
Jenna O' Brocto - Reflections on the Crime Beat
Nancy Gregg - Don't Worry Be Happy
David Denniger - It Ain't Necessarily So Ch.6 & 7 (1st Comment)


The Comment Informative: Evan Reynolds - The Journalism of Science
Ashlee Lupchinsky - Pseudo-Color Cliches


The Comment Grande: Evan Reynolds - The Journalism of Science


The Link Gracious: Michael Diezmos - It Ain't Necessarily So Ch.2 & 3
David Denniger - It Ain't Necessarily So Ch.6 & 7 (2nd Comment)


Wildcard

This article is sheerly just excitement for actually having a break after all of the hard work that has been put in so far. I am looking forward to the next break, because my mind is just about to fry soon. One thing that I did in this wildcard, is I made a comparison to other schools, discussing how we get a big break, when some of the larger schools don't get one. GO Seton Hill University! Anyway, here it is, courtesy of Jason Pugh.

BREAK!!!

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 07:16 PM | Comments (0)

November 8th Edition of the Tribune Review

I found an article in Tuesday's Trib that discussed the overall trials of torturing in the United States. "President Bush defended the U.S. interrogation of suspects in the war against terrorism Monday as 'within' the law." (Front Page). Then why are we going to trials over secret CIA prisons. This might not be necessarily a court case yet, but I think about all of the torture that was previously done in the past years, especially the one that showed pictures as evidence. Yes, they were taken care of, but its still good to question whether or not this is going on. And something tells me, we will be reading another court case that involves this torture. What is so funny about this, is that I am for military, and I personally am for George W. Bush. But it scares me that he is going to fall in line with our past presidents who say stupid crap, and it ends up biting them in the ass.

President Bush (Sr.)- READ MY LIPS. NO NEW TAXES.
President Clinton - I DID NOT HAVE SEXUAL RELATIONS WITH THAT WOMAN.

Hmmmmmmmm. Is there any possible room up there? I hope not, but something tells me that journalists are going to be eating this up if there is severe and unnecessary torture going on that the people didn't know about. Could be one of the best stories ever written. Let me know if you agree.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 06:06 PM | Comments (0)

It Ain't Necessarily So Introduction

"Until we learn the intricacies of media culture and the processes by which news is made, we are vulnerable to a daily does of misunderstanding contained in each morning's headlines. Indeed, we are at risk of perpetually misdiagnosing our modern world and the role we play in it." (Page 1).

First of all, this book is really interesting. Not really like completely gripping, but there are some really interesting points that are being made by these authors. Even if I did not take this course, I would have wanted to know whether we as the readers are really getting the right facts in the newspaper. Where are these sources coming from? Why are they absolutely relevant? These are questions that can be asked everytime someone reads a news article. They claim that their goal is to "reveal the inner workings" (Page 1) of finding out the news process of journalism. I think that the introduction makes a lot of claims, and whether or not they can establish them, will be seen in later chapters.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 05:58 PM | Comments (0)

IANS Chapter 8 & 9

"But peer review does not exempt research from criticism. (If it did, this book would be far shorter.) The real question, then, concerns the criteria for criticism." (Page 161).

I can agree and disagree with this statement. Some peer reviewed articles still can be criticized because of the way it was written, and the facts that might have been off. But if that's the case, then why do we use them? I think that Peer Reviewed Articles are the most dependent sources we have because of the idea that others are verify that the facts, and in some cases, interpretations are valid and strong. My only concern, is that the lesson given through this chapter up to this point is saying, "Don't trust anyone." Wow. What a terminator-ish thing to say. I just can't find myself believing that there is not one good piece of evidence still left out there that journalists can use to write. If they are saying "be careful," then thanks. Journalists try to be careful with what they put in a paper because that is their job to be fair. Not all journalists are good, but as I read this more, and talk to Chris about this, then I realize that they are really pushing a point that might not necessarily be so useful.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 05:46 PM | Comments (0)

It Ain't Necessarily So Conclusion

"All of these stories illustrate the related problems of tunnel vision and blind spots: that is, the dangers posed by looking in only one direction for an explanation, hence ignoring alternative explanations that give a rounder, fuller picture of a subject." (Page 163,164).

This chapter was one of the most interesting of all of the chapters. The discussion about tunnel vision and blind spots in journalism show a pretty bias indication of journalists. These authors have been right to a point, but as Chris has said, they are clearly using card stacking to get their point across, instead of giving a solution. Why? So the future journalists out there can realize future mistakes and try to avoid them? No. This book was meant for the common people; the people that read these newspapers everyday. They are basically giving warnings, which as true as a lot of this was, was somewhat unnecessary. The one thing that I must give this book some credit on, is the idea of the miscommunication between journalism and scientists. I think that sometimes, journalists are pushed for time (deadlines), and they get desparate to find a source. Sometimes, they see a source that will make them look better.

They really shouldn't do that, and IANS does a good job of recognizing it. But what they clearly did in 10 chapters, they could have done in 2. I just can't understand why so many are so one-sided on particular topics. I know that when we get into "We the Media" that I am just going to end up frustrated, while surprisingly informed. I just can't stand extremists, and the IANS authors have really turned into complete extremists. One piece of advice, GIVE A SOLUTION to a problem!!!! If you're feeling the same, then let me know.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 01:27 PM | Comments (0)

November 08, 2005

Why the What?

In the third story of Uncle Remus's stories, which although it was a challenge was very interesting, "Why the Negro is Black" was the most interesting of the three.

"In dem times we 'uz all un us black; we 'uz all niggers tergedder, en 'cordin' ter all de 'counts w'at I year fokes 'uz gittin 'long 'bout ez well in dem days ez dey is now. But atter' w'ile de news come dat dere was a pon' er water some'rs in de naberhood. w'ich if dey'd git inter dey'd be wash off nice en w'te, en den one un um, he fine de place en make er splunge inter de pon', en come out w'ite ez a town gal. En den, bless grashus! w'en de fokes seed it, dey make a break for de pon', en dem w'at wuz de snopless, dey got in fud' en dey come out w'ite: en dem w'at wuz de nex' soopless, dey got in nex', en dey come out merlatters; en dey wuz sech a crowd un um dat dey mighty nigh use de water up, w'ich w'en dem yuthers come 'long, de morest dey could do wuz ter paddle about wid der foots en dabble in it wid der han's. Dem wuz de niggers, en down ter dis day dey ain't no w'ite 'bout a nigger 'ceppin de pa'ms er der han's en de soles er der foot."

At the same time, I absolutely cannot stand the description about his status in life, and how he is treated. I know that we must look at this as analytical readers, but I am absolutely frustrated that he just accepts exactly who he is now, when there is something so much greater out there for him. Maybe it is good that he accepts who he is, and his grasp of togetherness is evident, because there was nothing greater for him to have in life. But isn't it just human nature to want to have or be something greater in life? It seems that he is set in his place, and it just absolutely bothers me. He should find a way to act, instead of just waiting. At the same time, there is not much to be done, and just waiting really is the only option. He is very insightful when he says that his race will be considered equals, but he just kind of waits, and that patience just seems to bother me. I'm very caught and torn up about this story, but I just hope that I can figure out which one I stand for. Help me if you can, because I can't make up my mind.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 12:56 AM | Comments (2)

November 01, 2005

Huck Finn Finale

(If this blog offends you, I apologize. Please consider the time frame written.)

"...Tom Sawyer had gone and took all that trouble and bother to set a free nigger free! and I couldn't ever understand, before, until that minute and that talk how he could help a body set a nigger free, with his bringing up." (Twain 317).

First off, let me say that I am more than excited that Jim is free at the end. I know that we are not supposed to do character analyses, but I am just glad to say that Jim is free after all the poor mistreatments he had to deal with. As much as I understand the time frame, and that was really how slaves were treated, you can't help but think that Jim is the main protagonist, not Huck. Yes, Huck was being abused by Pap, which nobody deserves. But as much as this story was called The Adventures of Huck Finn, this story could have been called The Adventures of Jim. Why Twain is making Jim out to be a protagonist, we have already discussed through the Smith and Smith excerpts.

One thing I noticed, on top of the fact that Jim was a protagonist, was that most of the white folk in the town were viewed as the antagonists by Twain. Pap: a drunkard and an abuser. The duke and the dauphin: scam artists and robbers. And above all, The Phelpses. These people who were holding on to Jim, shot their own nephew (who they thought was Sid, but it was Tom), over a slave. Greed has really become the sin of choice in this story, and the only good people in this story are the children and slaves. As crazy as that sounds, Twain is really getting a message across to the readers.

Posted by The Gentle Giant at 10:33 AM | Comments (6)