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EL-336. Orwell, Final Chapters. To be alike is not the same

"Various writers, such as Shakespeare, Milton, Swift, Byron, Dickens and some others were therefor in process of translation; when the task had been completed, their original writings, with all else that survived of the literature of the past, would be destroyed." (Orwell, 256)
The philosophies of The Party turned the citizens of Oceania into hate mongers, nationalists, just as the Nazis had. To take the writings of such established writers and destroy their works is just one other way of control. To translate their works is a slow and difficult process. But why ruin what was already adhered by readers all around the world. These writers suffered under many constraints to publish their works, in turn, they have become history, well-known, and established. Years of work for what? To be translated to fit the criteria of a mind controlling government, and then their final resting place, destruction! I hope that our country, the USA, never has to be forced into such degradation like that of Oceania. 1984 really freaks me out. Now that I look back, the Reagan years were compared to Orwell's book by extremists, radicals who felt that our country was in decline. "If you survived the 80s, you probably were not there."

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Comments

The poetry and writings of the masters you mentioned, Jeremy, were often written about God and Love. But those things were not allowed, so was the whole subject of a Shakespeare sonnet changed? Was all "art" now directed toward praise of BB? what were Kipling's poems geared toward. I have a book of the "Just So Stories" by Kipling and they were all about God and animals, how the world was created. I bet the "Just So Stories" were butchered

Yes, its scary to see the relationship between 1984 and historical events. The book not only comments on the events of the past, but also on the state of industrialized nations, and there stance on privacy and control.

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