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April 26, 2008

EL-336 Portfolio 3 To Infinity and Beyond

The History and Future of the Book; EL-336 comes to an end. This course has taught me the fundamentals and importance of cultures, how they succeeded to progress into digital technology, the final frontier of our lifetime. The pioneers of speech went back to ancient Greek times. Orators, as they were acknowledged, were important members of society who educated their civilizations on news, philosophy, and other important subject matter. Public speaking eventually led to books. Books were another way of transmitting information from one person to masses of people. One did not have to stand in a particular place in order to read, unlike speaking. The book was mobile. Books ultimately paved the way for a digital culture to arrive. The digital culture is one of the most important cultures because it affects society in the twenty first century. Most mechanisms are digital. The advent of digital technology has changed the ways consumers live their lives. Topics in Media and Culture has been an important learning tool in the field of communication. The course has opened my eyes to new levels of thinking.
SUPPORT
Aarseth ( ch5; 8-9)
WM Turkle
Kirschenbaum (preface, CH 1, CH 2)
Kirschenbaum (CH 3)
Kirschenbaum (finish)
Baio
Doctorow (1-81)
Doctorow (82-206)

COVERAGE

Doctorow (82-206)
Kirschenbaum (CH3)

TIMELINESS
WM Turkle
Kirschenbaum (Preface, CH1, CH 2)
Doctorow (82-206)

INTERACTION
Rachael Prichard on Aarseth (CH 5; 8-9)
Kayla Sawyer on WM Turkle
Daniella Choynowski on Kirschenbaum (Preface, Ch 1, Ch 2)
Leslie Rodriguez on Kirschenbaum (CH 3)

DEPTH
Aarseth (CH 5; 8-9)
Baio

DISCUSSION
Kayla Sawyer on Doctorow (1-81)
Rachael Prichard on Aarseth (CH 5; 8-9)

I want to close this semester out with a song from one of my favorite bands: The Clash

EL-336 Doctorow. It's Not Such a Small World After All

"The universe gets older. So do I. So does my backup, sitting in redundant distributed storage dirtside, ready for the day that space or age or stupidity kills me." (Doctorow p,206)

The universe is infinite and so is cyberspace. Digital technology can progress but never be destroyed. I say this as I write it in my blog, using technology. My blog will forever be preserved just as the microchip that was once a partial human being, live eternally dirtside until it is put into something else. So, we are only numbers in the physical world, or are we meaningful beings that make an impact in our society? Doctorow mentions, at the end of his book that, "Jeanine says it's pretty good, but what does she know? She's barely fifty." Is age mentioned to conflict technology? Humans eventually die, young or old, but the older they do, the wiser they are? Technology progresses, it never seems to die out, once a particular medium gets old, another one takes its place; it's a revolving door, unlike life.

April 22, 2008

EL-336 Magic Kingdom

"The problem was that she was really good at coding sims. Her Great Movie Ride rehab at MGM was breathtaking-the Star Wars sequence had already inspired a hundred fan-sites that fielded millions of hits." (Doctorow p,28)

Out of the physical world and dumped into the hypertext galaxy of 0s and 1s. The three main characters were two "has beens", important figures in history transferred to the Magic Kingdom, where youth maintains itself through rejuvenation.The third character, Lil, younger than the others, who maintanced the bots fantasized of them as being living, breathing creatures of habit. Or a virtual world where micro chips determine the outcome of situations.
Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom sort of was generated on the lines of 1984, but in the digital world, a controlled environment with a revolutionary plot.

April 21, 2008

EL-336; Kirschenbaum-Text Messaging

"The fundamental problem of communication is that of reproducing at one point either exactly or approximately a message selected at another point." (Shannon p,213)
So the message, if it is proven moreso than abstract, the less information it gives? The more defined a text is, the less it will be in the future. Does this mean that a message is defined for the period it was written in? Once discovered, many light years from the original point, does the meaning loose its values? I was somewhat confused about all of this. I thought the text was a solid foundation built to preserve its meaning. What I'm trying to say is; if somebody finds a cellular phone of mine, twenty years from now, they will be able to look in the 'in' box and discover who I was through my text messages that were saved.

April 20, 2008

EL-336 Response to Baio's Blog Entry

"I just wanted to clarify in writing what we discussed about "Restaurant" last Tuesday -- what I will and will not agree to.

I will not sign a blank sheet of paper: I refuse to take responsibility for "Restaurant" in the state it presently is in -- not knowing who is creatively in charge, how much thinking has actually been done, or how much of a script is written. ...

What I'd like to see is a piece of paper, on which is an exact, REALISTIC schedule of how much creative input the programmer is to receive, and when, that Bywater and/or Adams has/have signed. Then I'll tell you whether I agree to take the project or not. ..." (Amy Briggs)

After reading the blog, I was a little upset over the whole "is this journalism?" thing. I really do not feel that it is, or should be called journalism. Why? Can anybody with a computer type and post their opinions, or the statements of others? This makes me a little leery as to why I want to enter the journalism field.
Yes, it would be nice to have your created masterpiece posted on the internet for all to read but where does it stop and the professionals begin?
The information posted in Baio's blog was from an anonmyous source, who was the source? What if the source was misdirected and inaccurate? Does that not reflect on the blogger for posting false information? It should.
Baio should have checked the sources. There is a set of rules and guidelines a journalist must follow, I feel that he crossed those lines. It seems that there are millions of bloggers out in cyberspace who feel they have something important to say, I really do not feel the necessity to read what some nut thinks about the current election. That ultimately leads to debates that erupt into full blown conflicts.
So no, I do not think this should even capture nor define journalism. When I think of journalism, I think of the greats; such as Cronkite, Thompson, Churchill, and yes, even Couric.

April 17, 2008

EL-336 Kirschenbaum Agenda Item I Created (2)

Did interactive fiction lead to RPG games? If so, how? I understand that there are varying genres of games, from the computer to the game console but what is the difference between a PC game and, say an X-Box 360 game? Are the writer's of these particular mediums biased? The X Box 360 can do basically perform the same functions as a PC. Why don't gamers invent one universal medium to play games on, like interactive fiction?

April 16, 2008

EL-336 Kirschenbaum. Game After Game, It's All The Same

"...we find evidence that at one time this disk had at least two other games stored on it: Dung Beetles, and Blitzkrieg" "Beloved by some collectors and pored over by historians of reading and writing, a floppy disk image can reveal the hand of the reader or user." (Kirschenbaum p,127)
The collection of data on a disk remains there even after new data replaces it. This, in a way, connects to the function of the hard drive, that collects and stores information as well. The disk serves as a holder for information, in this case: games, that is able to be burned into the drive, the disk is also mobile, the information is able to be transmitted to more than one computer. As Kirschenbaum indicates, games written onto disks give historians of reading and writing insight as to what games were like in the past. The disk holds, a not so distant, memory of the past; the disk serves as a history book to the computer generated world.

April 13, 2008

EL-336 Kirschenbaum: Recycle Bins Are No Places For Monsters

"Lay users often know that when they delete a file from their trash or recycle bin it is not immediately expunged from their hard drive." (Kirschenbaum p,50)
When I use my PC I often attempt to clean up all the unnecessary files by dragging them to the trash bin. I was always under the assumption that when you throw something away it is gone for good, not the case for files that are taken to these temporary holding cells. They are stored as the prisoner file frees up space for new files to take their place. Then when they become unwanted, they become deleted. It is an endless cycle. The reason for the file not being permanently deleted is that it may need to be recovered at some point. The hard drive is the mastermind behind the operation. Without the concept of the hard drive, users would loose just about any work they have done in the past, it preserves memory while it writes new information.

April 12, 2008

EL-336 Response to Presentation Given by Jeremy B. April 10,2008

In response to my presentation, I had a few things to say about it. I feel that it went

well, there are things I never knew existed about the cyberworld until I researched it

extensively. Cultures derive from the societies that inhabit them; therefore new

innovations emerge constantly. During the first half of the semester, I asked myself the

question: why? Did we really need an oral society to lead to a digital age? Well, I guess I

answered my own question in my presentation. I took Bolter’s essay and did my own

experiment with it. I manipulated the text from Alice in Wonderland using the Mad

Hatter Tea Party selection, and transformed it from the manuscript to the hypertext. In the

presentation, I was attempting to show how the text morphs, by the use of editing,

new paragraph styles, and sometimes illustrations, or video in the case of the digital

format. The context of the book was not changed as everything around it had.

I could have taken a few paragraphs from the chapter, Alice in Wonderland, but I

saw it fit to show the entire chapter, that, I feel made the presentation more interesting. I

do appreciate all of the positive feedback that I received from the presentation. This made

me feel that I was grasping the concept, and the subject matter of the class very well.

If it were not for this course, I would have never opened my mind to any sort of

communication values. I always was of the notion that innovations emerged because

society was ignorant to what they had, traditionalists. Overall, I saw that the presenters

gave exceptional presentations, that were enlightening and informative. The questions

asked by them, and myself, were intriguing. In the future, I will shorten the length of time

on my presentations, and narrow the subject down a bit better.

April 9, 2008

EL-336 Oral Presentation on Writing Material-The Red Queens on Her Head

In the attempt to understand cyber culture, it is important to understand other cultures that laid a foundation for future cultures to cultivate. Oral, written, and manuscript. It was not until I ran across Jay David Bolter’s essay entitled The New Dialogue that I began to understand the necessity for the age of computers and the different versions of translation, in order to communicate with computer savvy users. His essay gave me the insight that I needed to defend the cyber world. Cyber world is defined as “the world of computers and communications”. So in this presentation, I am going to manipulate the text in a variety of ways that eventually progresses into the hypertext version of Alice in Wonderland, by Lewis Carroll. The section I will be using is The Mad Hatter Tea Party. The versions I am providing are worded differently but have the same underlying meaning.
I chose Bolter due to his book Writing Space: The Computer, Hypertext, and the History of Writing (1991). In his book he examines how computers are changing ways of reading and writing. Bolter’s scholarship examines how newer media such as hypertext, virtual reality, and the Web makes use of older communication technologies, including orality, printing, and photography.

1) I provide an example from Alice in Wonderland. The passage comes from the Mad Hatter tea party (text version)

A Mad Tea-Party
THERE was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. `Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse,' thought Alice; `only as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind.'
The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it. `No room! No room!' they cried out when they saw Alice coming. `There's plenty of room!' said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.
`Have some wine,' the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.
Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. `I don't see any wine,' she remarked.
`There isn't any,' said the March Hare.
`Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it,' said Alice angrily.
`It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited,' said the March Hare.
`I didn't know it was your table,' said Alice: `it's laid for a great many more than three.'
`Your hair wants cutting,' said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.
`You should learn not to make personal remarks,' Alice said with some severity: `it's very rude.'
The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was `Why is a raven like a writing- desk?'
`Come, we shall have some fun now!' thought Alice. `I'm glad they've begun asking riddles -- I believe I can guess that,' she added aloud.
`Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?' said the March Hare.
`Exactly so,' said Alice.
`Then you should say what you mean,' the March Hare went on.
`I do,' Alice hastily replied; `at least -- at least I mean what I say -- that's the same thing, you know.'
`Not the same thing a bit!' said the Hatter. `Why, you might just as well say that "I see what I eat" is the same thing as "I eat what I see'!"
`You might just as well say,' added the March Hare, `that "I like what I get" is the same thing as "I get what I like"!'
`You might just as well say,' added the Dormouse, which seemed to be talking in its sleep, `that "I breathe when I sleep" is the same thing as "I sleep when I breathe"!'
`It is the same thing with you,' said the Hatter, and here the conversation dropped, and the party sat silent for a minute, while Alice thought over all she could remember about ravens and writing-desks, which wasn't much.
The Hatter was the first to break the silence. `What day of the month is it?' he said, turning to Alice: he had taken his watch out of his pocket, and was looking at it uneasily, shaking it every now and then, and holding it to his ear.

3This is the digital version of the text. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0q-9aFzIbU
4) This is the hypertext version of The Mad Tea Party:
A Mad Tea Party
Link Back to Chapter VI: Pig and Pepper
There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and the talking over its head. `Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse,' thought Alice; `only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind.'
The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: `No room! No room!' they cried out when they saw Alice coming. `There's PLENTY of room!' said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.
`Have some wine,' the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.
Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. `I don't see any wine,' she remarked.
`There isn't any,' said the March Hare.
`Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it,' said Alice angrily.
`It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited,' said the March Hare.
`I didn't know it was YOUR table,' said Alice; `it's laid for a great many more than three.'
`Your hair wants cutting,' said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.
`You should learn not to make personal remarks,' Alice said with some severity; `it's very rude.'
The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he SAID was, `Why is a raven like a writing-desk?'
`Come, we shall have some fun now!' thought Alice. `I'm glad they've begun asking riddles.--I believe I can guess that,' she added aloud.
`Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?' said the March Hare.
`Exactly so,' said Alice.
`Then you should say what you mean,' the March Hare went on.
`I do,' Alice hastily replied; `at least--at least I mean what I say--that's the same thing, you know.'
`Not the same thing a bit!' said the Hatter. `You might just as well say that "I see what I eat" is the same thing as "I eat what I see"!'
`You might just as well say,' added the March Hare, `that "I like what I get" is the same thing as "I get what I like"!'
`You might just as well say,' added the Dormouse, who seemed to be talking in his sleep, `that "I breathe when I sleep" is the same thing as "I sleep when I breathe"!'
`It IS the same thing with you,' said the Hatter, and here the conversation dropped, and the party sat silent for a minute, while Alice thought over all she could remember about ravens and writing-desks, which wasn't much.
The Hatter was the first to break the silence. `What day of the month is it?' he said, turning to Alice: he had taken his watch out of his pocket, and was looking at it uneasily, shaking it every now and then, and holding it to his ear.
Alice considered a little, and then said `The fourth.'
`Two days wrong!' sighed the Hatter. `I told you butter wouldn't suit the works!' he added looking angrily at the March Hare.
`It was the BEST butter,' the March Hare meekly replied.
`Yes, but some crumbs must have got in as well,' the Hatter grumbled: `you shouldn't have put it in with the bread-knife.'
The March Hare took the watch and looked at it gloomily: then he dipped it into his cup of tea, and looked at it again: but he could think of nothing better to say than his first remark, `It was the BEST butter, you know.'
Alice had been looking over his shoulder with some curiosity. `What a funny watch!' she remarked. `It tells the day of the month, and doesn't tell what o'clock it is!'
`Why should it?' muttered the Hatter. `Does YOUR watch tell you what year it is?'
`Of course not,' Alice replied very readily: `but that's because it stays the same year for such a long time together.'
`Which is just the case with MINE,' said the Hatter.
Alice felt dreadfully puzzled. The Hatter's remark seemed to have no sort of meaning in it, and yet it was certainly English. `I don't quite understand you,' she said, as politely as she could.
`The Dormouse is asleep again,' said the Hatter, and he poured a little hot tea upon its nose.
The Dormouse shook its head impatiently, and said, without opening its eyes, `Of course, of course; just what I was going to remark myself.'
`Have you guessed the riddle yet?' the Hatter said, turning to Alice again.
`No, I give it up,' Alice replied: `that's the answer?'
`I haven't the slightest idea,' said the Hatter.
`Nor I,' said the March Hare.
Alice sighed wearily. `I think you might do something better with the time,' she said, `than waste it in asking riddles that have no answers.'
`If you knew Time as well as I do,' said the Hatter, `you wouldn't talk about wasting IT. It's HIM.'
`I don't know what you mean,' said Alice.
`Of course you don't!' the Hatter said, tossing his head contemptuously. `I dare say you never even spoke to Time!'
`Perhaps not,' Alice cautiously replied: `but I know I have to beat time when I learn music.'
`Ah! that accounts for it,' said the Hatter. `He won't stand beating. Now, if you only kept on good terms with him, he'd do almost anything you liked with the clock. For instance, suppose it were nine o'clock in the morning, just time to begin lessons: you'd only have to whisper a hint to Time, and round goes the clock in a twinkling! Half-past one, time for dinner!'
(`I only wish it was,' the March Hare said to itself in a whisper.)
`That would be grand, certainly,' said Alice thoughtfully: `but then--I shouldn't be hungry for it, you know.'
`Not at first, perhaps,' said the Hatter: `but you could keep it to half-past one as long as you liked.'
`Is that the way YOU manage?' Alice asked.
The Hatter shook his head mournfully. `Not I!' he replied. `We quarrelled last March--just before HE went mad, you know--' (pointing with his tea spoon at the March Hare,) `--it was at the great concert given by the Queen of Hearts, and I had to sing


"Twinkle, twinkle, little bat!
How I wonder what you're at!"


You know the song, perhaps?'
`I've heard something like it,' said Alice.
`It goes on, you know,' the Hatter continued, `in this way:--


"Up above the world you fly,
Like a tea-tray in the sky.
Twinkle, twinkle--"'


Here the Dormouse shook itself, and began singing in its sleep `Twinkle, twinkle, twinkle, twinkle--' and went on so long that they had to pinch it to make it stop.
`Well, I'd hardly finished the first verse,' said the Hatter, `when the Queen jumped up and bawled out, "He's murdering the time! Off with his head!"'
`How dreadfully savage!' exclaimed Alice.
`And ever since that,' the Hatter went on in a mournful tone, `he won't do a thing I ask! It's always six o'clock now.'
A bright idea came into Alice's head. `Is that the reason so many tea-things are put out here?' she asked.
`Yes, that's it,' said the Hatter with a sigh: `it's always tea-time, and we've no time to wash the things between whiles.'
`Then you keep moving round, I suppose?' said Alice.
`Exactly so,' said the Hatter: `as the things get used up.'
`But what happens when you come to the beginning again?' Alice ventured to ask.
`Suppose we change the subject,' the March Hare interrupted, yawning. `I'm getting tired of this. I vote the young lady tells us a story.'
`I'm afraid I don't know one,' said Alice, rather alarmed at the proposal.
`Then the Dormouse shall!' they both cried. `Wake up, Dormouse!' And they pinched it on both sides at once.
The Dormouse slowly opened his eyes. `I wasn't asleep,' he said in a hoarse, feeble voice: `I heard every word you fellows were saying.'
`Tell us a story!' said the March Hare.
`Yes, please do!' pleaded Alice.
`And be quick about it,' added the Hatter, `or you'll be asleep again before it's done.'
`Once upon a time there were three little sisters,' the Dormouse began in a great hurry; `and their names were Elsie, Lacie, and Tillie; and they lived at the bottom of a well--'
`What did they live on?' said Alice, who always took a great interest in questions of eating and drinking.
`They lived on treacle,' said the Dormouse, after thinking a minute or two.
`They couldn't have done that, you know,' Alice gently remarked; `they'd have been ill.'
`So they were,' said the Dormouse; `VERY ill.'
Alice tried to fancy to herself what such an extraordinary ways of living would be like, but it puzzled her too much, so she went on: `But why did they live at the bottom of a well?'
`Take some more tea,' the March Hare said to Alice, very earnestly.
`I've had nothing yet,' Alice replied in an offended tone, `so I can't take more.'
`You mean you can't take LESS,' said the Hatter: `it's very easy to take MORE than nothing.'
`Nobody asked YOUR opinion,' said Alice.
`Who's making personal remarks now?' the Hatter asked triumphantly.
Alice did not quite know what to say to this: so she helped herself to some tea and bread-and-butter, and then turned to the Dormouse, and repeated her question. `Why did they live at the bottom of a well?'
The Dormouse again took a minute or two to think about it, and then said, `It was a treacle-well.'
`There's no such thing!' Alice was beginning very angrily, but the Hatter and the March Hare went `Sh! sh!' and the Dormouse sulkily remarked, `If you can't be civil, you'd better finish the story for yourself.'
`No, please go on!' Alice said very humbly; `I won't interrupt again. I dare say there may be ONE.'
`One, indeed!' said the Dormouse indignantly. However, he consented to go on. `And so these three little sisters--they were learning to draw, you know--'
`What did they draw?' said Alice, quite forgetting her promise.
`Treacle,' said the Dormouse, without considering at all this time.
`I want a clean cup,' interrupted the Hatter: `let's all move one place on.'
He moved on as he spoke, and the Dormouse followed him: the March Hare moved into the Dormouse's place, and Alice rather unwillingly took the place of the March Hare. The Hatter was the only one who got any advantage from the change: and Alice was a good deal worse off than before, as the March Hare had just upset the milk-jug into his plate.
Alice did not wish to offend the Dormouse again, so she began very cautiously: `But I don't understand. Where did they draw the treacle from?'
`You can draw water out of a water-well,' said the Hatter; `so I should think you could draw treacle out of a treacle-well--eh, stupid?'
`But they were IN the well,' Alice said to the Dormouse, not choosing to notice this last remark.
`Of course they were', said the Dormouse; `--well in.'
This answer so confused poor Alice, that she let the Dormouse go on for some time without interrupting it.
`They were learning to draw,' the Dormouse went on, yawning and rubbing its eyes, for it was getting very sleepy; `and they drew all manner of things--everything that begins with an M--'
`Why with an M?' said Alice.
`Why not?' said the March Hare.
Alice was silent.
The Dormouse had closed its eyes by this time, and was going off into a doze; but, on being pinched by the Hatter, it woke up again with a little shriek, and went on: `--that begins with an M, such as mouse-traps, and the moon, and memory, and muchness-- you know you say things are "much of a muchness"--did you ever see such a thing as a drawing of a muchness?'
`Really, now you ask me,' said Alice, very much confused, `I don't think--'
`Then you shouldn't talk,' said the Hatter.
This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear: she got up in great disgust, and walked off; the Dormouse fell asleep instantly, and neither of the others took the least notice of her going, though she looked back once or twice, half hoping that they would call after her: the last time she saw them, they were trying to put the Dormouse into the teapot.
`At any rate I'll never go THERE again!' said Alice as she picked her way through the wood. `It's the stupidest tea-party I ever was at in all my life!'
Just as she said this, she noticed that one of the trees had a door leading right into it. `That's very curious!' she thought. `But everything's curious today. I think I may as well go in at once.' And in she went.
Once more she found herself in the long hall, and close to the little glass table. `Now, I'll manage better this time,' she said to herself, and began by taking the little golden key, and unlocking the door that led into the garden. Then she wet to work nibbling at the mushroom (she had kept a piece of it in her pocked) till she was about a foot high: then she walked down the little passage: and THEN--she found herself at last in the beautiful garden, among the bright flower-beds and the cool fountains.
2) Manuscript version of the Mad Hatter Tea Party:
Chapter 7
________________________________________
A Mad Tea-Party

There was a table set out under a tree in front of the house, and the March Hare and the Hatter were having tea at it: a Dormouse was sitting between them, fast asleep, and the other two were using it as a cushion, resting their elbows on it, and talking over its head. 'Very uncomfortable for the Dormouse,' thought Alice; 'only, as it's asleep, I suppose it doesn't mind.'

The table was a large one, but the three were all crowded together at one corner of it: 'No room! No room!' they cried out when they saw Alice coming. 'There's plenty of room!' said Alice indignantly, and she sat down in a large arm-chair at one end of the table.

'Have some wine,' the March Hare said in an encouraging tone.

Alice looked all round the table, but there was nothing on it but tea. 'I don't see any wine,' she remarked.

'There isn't any,' said the March Hare.

'Then it wasn't very civil of you to offer it,' said Alice angrily.

'It wasn't very civil of you to sit down without being invited,' said the March Hare.

'I didn't know it was your table,' said Alice; 'it's laid for a great many more than three.'

'Your hair wants cutting,' said the Hatter. He had been looking at Alice for some time with great curiosity, and this was his first speech.

'You should learn not to make personal remarks,' Alice said with some severity; 'it's very rude.'

The Hatter opened his eyes very wide on hearing this; but all he said was, 'Why is a raven like a writing-desk?'

'Come, we shall have some fun now!' thought Alice. 'I'm glad they've begun asking riddles. - I believe I can guess that,' she added aloud.

'Do you mean that you think you can find out the answer to it?' said the March Hare.

'Exactly so,' said Alice.

'Then you should say what you mean,' the March Hare went on.

'I do,' Alice hastily replied; 'at least - at least I mean what I say - that's the same thing, you know.'

'Not the same thing a bit!' said the Hatter. 'You might just as well say that "I see what I eat" is the same thing as "I eat what I see"!'

'You might just as well say,' added the March Hare, 'that "I like what I get" is the same thing as "I get what I like"!'

'You might just as well say,' added the Dormouse, who seemed to be talking in his sleep, 'that "I breathe when I sleep" is the same thing as "I sleep when I breathe"!'

'It is the same thing with you,' said the Hatter, and here the conversation dropped, and the party sat silent for a minute, while Alice thought over all she could remember about ravens and writing-desks, which wasn't much.

The Hatter was the first to break the silence. 'What day of the month is it?' he said, turning to Alice: he had taken his watch out of his pocket, and was looking at it uneasily, shaking it every now and then, and holding it to his ear.

Alice considered a little, and then said 'The fourth.'

'Two days wrong!' sighed the Hatter. 'I told you butter wouldn't suit the works!' he added looking angrily at the March Hare.

'It was the best butter,' the March Hare meekly replied.

'Yes, but some crumbs must have got in as well,' the Hatter grumbled: 'you shouldn't have put it in with the bread-knife.'

The March Hare took the watch and looked at it gloomily: then he dipped it into his cup of tea, and looked at it again: but he could think of nothing better to say than his first remark, 'It was the best butter, you know.'

Alice had been looking over his shoulder with some curiosity. 'What a funny watch!' she remarked. 'It tells the day of the month, and doesn't tell what o'clock it is!'

'Why should it?' muttered the Hatter. 'Does your watch tell you what year it is?'

'Of course not,' Alice replied very readily: 'but that's because it stays the same year for such a long time together.'

'Which is just the case with mine,' said the Hatter.

Alice felt dreadfully puzzled. The Hatter's remark seemed to have no sort of meaning in it, and yet it was certainly English. 'I don't quite understand you,' she said, as politely as she could.

'The Dormouse is asleep again,' said the Hatter, and he poured a little hot tea upon its nose.

The Dormouse shook its head impatiently, and said, without opening its eyes, 'Of course, of course; just what I was going to remark myself.'

'Have you guessed the riddle yet?' the Hatter said, turning to Alice again.

'No, I give it up,' Alice replied: 'what's the answer?'

'I haven't the slightest idea,' said the Hatter.

'Nor I,' said the March Hare.

Alice sighed wearily. 'I think you might do something better with the time,' she said, 'than waste it in asking riddles that have no answers.'

'If you knew Time as well as I do,' said the Hatter, 'you wouldn't talk about wasting it. It's him.'

'I don't know what you mean,' said Alice.

'Of course you don't!' the Hatter said, tossing his head contemptuously. 'I dare say you never even spoke to Time!'

'Perhaps not,' Alice cautiously replied: 'but I know I have to beat time when I learn music.'

'Ah! that accounts for it,' said the Hatter. 'He won't stand beating. Now, if you only kept on good terms with him, he'd do almost anything you liked with the clock. For instance, suppose it were nine o'clock in the morning, just time to begin lessons: you'd only have to whisper a hint to Time, and round goes the clock in a twinkling! Half-past one, time for dinner!'

('I only wish it was,' the March Hare said to itself in a whisper.)

'That would be grand, certainly,' said Alice thoughtfully: 'but then - I shouldn't be hungry for it, you know.'

'Not at first, perhaps,' said the Hatter: 'but you could keep it to half-past one as long as you liked.'

'Is that the way you manage?' Alice asked.

The Hatter shook his head mournfully. 'Not I!' he replied. 'We quarrelled last March - just before he went mad, you know - ' (pointing with his tea spoon at the March Hare,) ' - it was at the great concert given by the Queen of Hearts, and I had to sing

"Twinkle, twinkle, little bat!
How I wonder what you're at!"

You know the song, perhaps?'

'I've heard something like it,' said Alice.

'It goes on, you know,' the Hatter continued, 'in this way: -

"Up above the world you fly,
Like a tea-tray in the sky.
Twinkle, twinkle - "'

Here the Dormouse shook itself, and began singing in its sleep 'Twinkle, twinkle, twinkle, twinkle - ' and went on so long that they had to pinch it to make it stop.

'Well, I'd hardly finished the first verse,' said the Hatter, 'when the Queen jumped up and bawled out, "He's murdering the time! Off with his head!"'

'How dreadfully savage!' exclaimed Alice.

'And ever since that,' the Hatter went on in a mournful tone, 'he won't do a thing I ask! It's always six o'clock now.'

A bright idea came into Alice's head. 'Is that the reason so many tea-things are put out here?' she asked.

'Yes, that's it,' said the Hatter with a sigh: 'it's always tea-time, and we've no time to wash the things between whiles.'

'Then you keep moving round, I suppose?' said Alice.

'Exactly so,' said the Hatter: 'as the things get used up.'

'But what happens when you come to the beginning again?' Alice ventured to ask.

'Suppose we change the subject,' the March Hare interrupted, yawning. 'I'm getting tired of this. I vote the young lady tells us a story.'

'I'm afraid I don't know one,' said Alice, rather alarmed at the proposal.

'Then the Dormouse shall!' they both cried. 'Wake up, Dormouse!' And they pinched it on both sides at once.

The Dormouse slowly opened his eyes. 'I wasn't asleep,' he said in a hoarse, feeble voice: 'I heard every word you fellows were saying.'

'Tell us a story!' said the March Hare.

'Yes, please do!' pleaded Alice.

'And be quick about it,' added the Hatter, 'or you'll be asleep again before it's done.'

'Once upon a time there were three little sisters,' the Dormouse began in a great hurry; 'and their names were Elsie, Lacie, and Tillie; and they lived at the bottom of a well - '

'What did they live on?' said Alice, who always took a great interest in questions of eating and drinking.

'They lived on treacle,' said the Dormouse, after thinking a minute or two.

'They couldn't have done that, you know,' Alice gently remarked; 'they'd have been ill.'

'So they were,' said the Dormouse; 'very ill.'

Alice tried to fancy to herself what such an extraordinary ways of living would be like, but it puzzled her too much, so she went on: 'But why did they live at the bottom of a well?'

'Take some more tea,' the March Hare said to Alice, very earnestly.

'I've had nothing yet,' Alice replied in an offended tone, 'so I can't take more.'

'You mean you can't take less,' said the Hatter: 'it's very easy to take more than nothing.'

'Nobody asked your opinion,' said Alice.

'Who's making personal remarks now?' the Hatter asked triumphantly.

Alice did not quite know what to say to this: so she helped herself to some tea and bread-and-butter, and then turned to the Dormouse, and repeated her question. 'Why did they live at the bottom of a well?'

The Dormouse again took a minute or two to think about it, and then said, 'It was a treacle-well.'

'There's no such thing!' Alice was beginning very angrily, but the Hatter and the March Hare went 'Sh! sh!' and the Dormouse sulkily remarked, 'If you can't be civil, you'd better finish the story for yourself.'

'No, please go on!' Alice said very humbly; 'I won't interrupt again. I dare say there may be one.'

'One, indeed!' said the Dormouse indignantly. However, he consented to go on. 'And so these three little sisters - they were learning to draw, you know - '

'What did they draw?' said Alice, quite forgetting her promise.

'Treacle,' said the Dormouse, without considering at all this time.

'I want a clean cup,' interrupted the Hatter: 'let's all move one place on.'

He moved on as he spoke, and the Dormouse followed him: the March Hare moved into the Dormouse's place, and Alice rather unwillingly took the place of the March Hare. The Hatter was the only one who got any advantage from the change: and Alice was a good deal worse off than before, as the March Hare had just upset the milk-jug into his plate.

Alice did not wish to offend the Dormouse again, so she began very cautiously: 'But I don't understand. Where did they draw the treacle from?'

'You can draw water out of a water-well,' said the Hatter; 'so I should think you could draw treacle out of a treacle-well - eh, stupid?'

'But they were in the well,' Alice said to the Dormouse, not choosing to notice this last remark.

'Of course they were', said the Dormouse; ' - well in.'

This answer so confused poor Alice, that she let the Dormouse go on for some time without interrupting it.

'They were learning to draw,' the Dormouse went on, yawning and rubbing its eyes, for it was getting very sleepy; 'and they drew all manner of things - everything that begins with an M - '

'Why with an M?' said Alice.

'Why not?' said the March Hare.

Alice was silent.

The Dormouse had closed its eyes by this time, and was going off into a doze; but, on being pinched by the Hatter, it woke up again with a little shriek, and went on: ' - that begins with an M, such as mouse-traps, and the moon, and memory, and muchness - you know you say things are "much of a muchness" - did you ever see such a thing as a drawing of a muchness?'

'Really, now you ask me,' said Alice, very much confused, 'I don't think - '

'Then you shouldn't talk,' said the Hatter.

This piece of rudeness was more than Alice could bear: she got up in great disgust, and walked off; the Dormouse fell asleep instantly, and neither of the others took the least notice of her going, though she looked back once or twice, half hoping that they would call after her: the last time she saw them, they were trying to put the Dormouse into the teapot.

'At any rate I'll never go there again!' said Alice as she picked her way through the wood. 'It's the stupidest tea-party I ever was at in all my life!'

Just as she said this, she noticed that one of the trees had a door leading right into it. 'That's very curious!' she thought. 'But everything's curious today. I think I may as well go in at once.' And in she went.

Once more she found herself in the long hall, and close to the little glass table. 'Now, I'll manage better this time,' she said to herself, and began by taking the little golden key, and unlocking the door that led into the garden. Then she went to work nibbling at the mushroom (she had kept a piece of it in her pocket) till she was about a foot high: then she walked down the little passage: and then - she found herself at last in the beautiful garden, among the bright flower-beds and the cool fountains.

5) Translation from English to Arabic:

كان [ت-برتي]
مجنونة هناك طاولة يبدى تحت شجرة أمام المنزل, مارس - آذار أرنب برّيّة وال [هتّر] كان تلقّى شاي في هو: جلس [دورمووس] كان بين هم, سريعة نائمة, والأخرى اثنان كان استعمل هو كوسادة, استراح كولهم على هو, وتحدّث على رأسه. "جدّا متضايق ل ال [دورمووس]," فكرة [أليس]; "فقط بما أنّ هو يكون نائمة, يفترض أنا هو لا يبالي. "
كان الطاولة كبيرة واحدة, غير أنّ الثلاثة كان كلّ يحتشد معا في واحدة ركن من هو. `ما من غرفة! ما من غرفة! 'صرخ هم خارجا عندما هم رأوا [أليس] يأتي. "هناك كثير الغرفة!" يقول جلس [أليس] [إينديننتلي], وهو إلى أسفل في [أرم-شير] كبيرة في واحدة نهاية من الطاولة.
"تلقّيت بعض خمر," مارس - آذار أرنب برّيّة يقال في مشجّع نغمة.
[أليس] نظر كلّ حول الطاولة, غير أنّ كان هناك لاشيء على هو غير أنّ شاي. لا يرى أنا أيّ خمر," هو لاحظ.
"ليس هناك أيّ," قال مارس - آذار أرنب برّيّة.
"بعد ذلك [ب] هو لم جدّا مدنيّة من أنت أن يقدّم هو," قال [أليس] بغضب.
"[ب] هو لم جدّا مدنيّة من أنت أن يجلس إلى أسفل دون يكون يدعى," قال مارس - آذار أرنب برّيّة.
"لم يعرف أنا هو كان طاولتك," قال [أليس]: "قد وضع هو لعظيمة [مني مور] من ثلاثة. "
"يريد شعرك عمليّة قطع," قال ال [هتّر]. نظر هو تلقّى يكون في [أليس] ل بعض وقت مع فضول عظيمة, وهذا كان خطبته أولى.
"أنت سوفت علمت لا أن يجعل ملاحظات شخصيّة," [أليس] يقال مع بعض قساوة: "هو جدّا غليظة. "
فتح ال [هتّر] أعينه جدّا عرضا على يسمع هذا; غير أنّ كلّ هو قال كان "لماذا يكون [ا] [رفن] مثل [وريتينغ-] مكتب? "
"يأتي, نحن سوفت سيتلقّى بعض حالة لهو الآن!" فكرة [أليس]. "أنا سعيدة هم يبدأ يسأل لغات -- أنا أصدق أنا يستطيع خمّنت أنّ," هو أضاف بجهارة” يعني أنت أنّ أنت تفكّر أنت يستطيع وجدت خارجا الجوابة إلى هو?" قال مارس - آذار أرنب برّيّة.
قال "تماما هكذا," [أليس].
"بعد ذلك أنت سوفت قلت ماذا أنت تعني," مارس - آذار أرنب برّيّة ذهب على.
"يتمّ أنا," [أليس] بتهوّر يجاب; "على الأقلّ -- على الأقلّ يعني أنا ماذا أنا أقول -- أنّ ال نفسه شيء, يعرف أنت. "
"لا ال نفسه شيء لقمة!" قال ال [هتّر]” أنت أمكن [جوست س ولّ] قلت, 'يضيف مارس - آذار أرنب برّيّة, "أنّ "يحبّ أنا ماذا أنا أحصل" يكون ال نفسه شيء بما أنّ "أنا أحصل ماذا أنا أحبّ"! "
"أنت أمكن [جوست س ولّ] قلت," أضاف ال [دورمووس], أيّ بدا أن يكون تحدّثت في نومه, "أنّ "أنا أتنفّس عندما ينام أنا" ال نفسه شيء بما أنّ "أنا أنام عندما أنا أتنفّس"! قال"
"هو ال نفسه شيء مع أنت," ال [هتّر], وهنا المحادثة سقط, والحزب جلس يسكت لدقيقة, بينما [أليس] فكرة على كلّ هو استطاع تذكّرت حول غدافات و [وريتينغ-دسكس], أيّ [ب] لم كثير.
كان ال [هتّر] الأولى أن يكسر الحالة سكون. "ما يوم من الشهر يكون هو?" هو قال, يلتفت إلى [أليس]: هو كان قد أخذ ساعته من جيبه, وكان نظر في هو بشكل قلق, هزّ هو كلّ الآن وبعد ذلك, وأمسك هو إلى أذنه.
6) Translation from English to Chinese Traditional:
那裡一個瘋狂的
茶黨是桌開始在一棵樹下在房子前面,并且3月野兔和帽商和喝茶在它: 睡鼠坐在他們之間,熟睡,并且其他二使用它作為坐墊,休息他們的手肘對此,并且談話在它的頭。 「非常難受為睡鼠』,想法阿麗斯; 「只有因為它睡著,我假設它不介意。』
桌是一大一個,但三是全部一起擁擠在一個角落的它。 `沒有室! 沒有室! 當他們看了阿麗斯來, 『他們大聲呼喊。 「有大量室!』 說的阿麗斯憤概地和她在一把大扶手椅子坐下了在桌的一個末端。
「有一些酒』, 3月野兔在令人鼓舞口氣認為。
阿麗斯看了所有圓桌,但沒什麼在它,但茶。我沒看見任何酒, 『她陳述了。
「沒有其中任一』, 3月野兔說。
「然後您提供它』,惱怒地說阿麗斯是非常不民用的。
「您坐下是非常不民用的,不用被邀請』, 3月野兔說。
「我不知道它是您的桌』,阿麗斯說: 「它為偉大許多比三放置了。』
「您的頭髮想要切口』,帽商說。 他有一段時間了看阿麗斯以巨大求知慾,并且這是他的第一講話。
「您應該學會不做個人評論』,阿麗斯說以一些嚴肅: 「它是非常粗魯的。』
帽商非常寬張開了他的眼睛在聽見此; 但他說的所有「為什麼是掠奪像書桌?』
「來,我們現在將獲得一些樂趣!』 想法阿麗斯。 「我是高興的他們開始要求謎語 -- 我相信我可以猜測那』,她大聲增加了。「您意味著您認為您能發現答復到它?』 3月野兔說。
「確切地如此』,阿麗斯說。
「然後您應該說什麼您意味』, 3月野兔去在。
「我』,阿麗斯倉促地回復; 「至少 -- 至少我意味什麼我說 -- 那是同一件事,您知道。』
「不是同一件事位!』 帽商說。為什麼,您也許說「我看見什麼我吃」是事和一樣「我吃什麼I see'!」
「您也許認為』,增加3月野兔, 「「我喜歡什麼我得到」是事和一樣「我得到什麼我喜歡」! 』
「您也許說』,增加了睡鼠,似乎談話在它的睡眠, 「「我呼吸,當我睡覺」是事時和一樣「我睡覺,當我呼吸」! 』
「它是同一件事與您』,帽商說,并且交談這裡下降了,并且黨坐了沈默在一分鐘,當阿麗斯想法她可能記住關於掠奪和文字書桌,不是的全部時。
帽商是打破沈默的一个。 「什麼日是它?』 他說,轉向阿麗斯:他採取了他的手錶在他的口袋外面和心神不安地看它,常常震動它,并且拿著它到他的耳朵。
Most of these versions are readable, to a degree, the text may have been transformed but has the same meaning regardless of how it is laid out.


April 7, 2008

EL-336 Aarseth Cybertext Video Texts

"When I fire a virtual laser gun in a computer game such as Space Invaders, where, and what, am "I"? (Aarseth p, 162)
I had to pick the above passage because I loved Space Invaders. I can remember when I had an Atari, that was the coolest game ever.
The computer adventure game's formula seems fairly easy, add one popular fiction genre, create a background story, a dash of map, characters to interact with, add a plot tree or graph with several outcomes, a pinch of descriptions, dialogue, error messages, and a vocabulary for the player, and you have yourself a game.
The problem I seem to think I have with those type of games, RPG; more or less, is that the computer does all the hard work for us. It is the mind of the game, it determines the outcome. All the player does is sits behind the wheel and steers.
An example of this is found in the game Resident Evil: The Umbrella Chronicles. Yes, the fun is shooting infected zombies, while picking up weapons and healing potions but the computer does everything else. It basically plays the game for me, it walks, talks, and directs the my character in the places it wants me to be, not me. All I get to do is shoot things, which is not a bad thing.
The brain is not ours, it is a digitized version sucked into a computer game.

April 5, 2008

EL-336 Writing Material Turkle: The Vividness of a Distant Reality

"Which would you rather see-a Disney crocodile robot or a real crocodile?"(Turkle 479,480)

The age of computers, the digital age has made reality, in the physical sense, a thing of the past. With computers came an artificial aspect to them. In Turkle's section The Loss of The Real, I came to a revelation. It is more safe to play a video game, blasting zombies than it would be to take a zombie on in real life. The sense of adventure is gone, an artificial flavoring has taken its place. A distance has been set by the onslaught of technology. Computers have robbed us of the real. I am not putting down technology, I am one of the biggest consumers of it. It's just that I understand what is meant when Turkle discusses the fact that reality exists only on screen. Have we become a group of recluses who isolate ourselves in our little homes mandated by a PC? It appears that way. Or have we become brainwashed by a future of technology? The outside world does not exist.

April 2, 2008

EL-336 Portfolio 2. Second to None

The History and Future of the Book, EL-336. This is the second half of the semester, and the second portfolio. I have learned a lot from this course. I never really considered the different cultures that have changed society before now. From Oral Culture to Digital Culture, our class has covered all bases. I have new perspective on society and the many cultures that have passed through our universe.

-Support-

*CALVINO*
*DOUGLASS*
*McLUHAN (91-180)*
*CALVINO(continued)*
*McLUHAN(180-263)*
* href="http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JeremyBarrick/2008/03/el336_orwell1984_i_always_feel.html">ORWELL(selection)*
*ORWELL(selection)*
*AaRSETH*

-COVERAGE-
*McLUHAN*
*ORWELL*

-TIMELINESS-
*DOUGLASS*

-INTERACTION-
*DAVE CRISTELLO*
*KAYLA SAWYER*
*RACHEL PRICHARD*

-DEPTH-
*ORWELL*
*DOUGLASS*

-DISCUSSION-
*DAVE CRISTELLO*
*DANIELLA CHOYNOWSKI*
*CHRIS ULICNE*

EL-336 Aarseth-CYBERTEXT. The Great Space Coaster

"I wish to challenge the recurrent practice of applying the theories of literary criticism to a new empirical field, seemingly without any reassessment of the terms and concepts involved." (Aarseth,14)
What I gathered from this book was that there are new ways of writing and reading. This 'new' language can be attributed to the computer. The computer has become the mainstream. There basically are no more book, letters written, or department stores. The digital galaxy has turned 'traditional' values into history. Now back to my point. Emoticons have replaced writing- : 0 ; ( I just expressed myself, after reading CYBERTEXT, by using a few symbols that made a picture of puzzlement, and sadness. I didn't have to write anything.
Digital text is another planet far, far, away. I am young and do not understand half of it. OMG, BFF, LOL, HS, TBFY...and a digital dictionary more.
I was not shocked by reading Aarseth, I knew that our language and writing would eventually be replaced, although the digital language is compared to literary language.
To the older generation, I would imagine that the digital language is like trying to learn a foreign language; whereas the youth of today, raised in the digital age, know it fluently.
I for one would love to learn Huttese, the official language of Jabba the Hutt.