Even when it's a review, I learn something new...and rhyme too!

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A news story doesn't need a conclusion. It should be written so that the bottom of the story can be chopped off at any time.

--Dr. Jerz's Copyediting Document

This was mostly a review for me. However, I did learn/refresh on a few major things to remember. Even though I've written news articles before, I always try to wrap them up, despite the fact that this is unnecessary in those articles, because the ending usually gets chopped off to save space anyway.

Do not include "Dr." as part of a faculty member's name.

I've actually never heard this one before. In the past, I was always told to keep the "Dr." or "Mr."  on the first mention, but after that to just write the last name. So, if I'm talking about "Dr. Dennis Jerz, Associate professor of English" at first mention, I would just say "Jerz" every mention after that, but according to this document, I wouldn't even include the Dr. in the beginning? Huh. Guess I do learn something new everyday. :-)


Assistant News Editor, Anne O'Nymous read the article

In this example, it would be better to identify Anne after her name, rather than before: Anne O'Nymous, assistant news editor, read the article.

She was highly appreciated by Jameson for solving the problem. "I really appreciate her work ethic and problem-solving ability," said Jameson.

In this example, the sentence before the quote basically says the same thing that the quote says, so the sentence really isn't necessary. The author should think of a better way to lead into the quote or just let the quote stand alone.

Spunky Inkworthy has only written for The Setonian this year, but Obituaries Editor, Lazarus O'Mortigan, was very complimentary towards Spunky's contributions.

Instead of just saying Lazarus was very complimentary towards Spunky, the author should have used a quote explaining the complements. Also, "Spunky" should be "Inkyworthy."

In a telephone call from Head Librarian Marian Paroo, she discussed Inkworthy's contributions.

The fact that this was a telephone interview is not important to the article. The author should focus instead on what these contributions were. This sentence, in retrospect, is completely unnecessary.

"Here is a quote", said Bill Jones freshman.

For this quote, the comma should be placed within the quotation marks, and the credit should read "said Bill Jones, a freshman" or "said freshman Bill Jones." If this is second mention, it should simply say "said Jones."


1 Comments

Wendy Scott said:

I have to agree with you post on the review! You are an amazing writer!
"Even though I've written news articles before, I always try to wrap them up, despite the fact that this is unnecessary in those articles, because the ending usually gets chopped off to save space anyway."
I have to say I do the same thing. I am not the best a writing news articles but did a bit for my school paper. Sports articles. An your right the ending normally get cut. Though I alway's try to squeeze one last bit of information that might be informative. Though it is pointless.
Your post gave me a better understanding on use of commas as well I tend to go comma crazy.
Very infomative post!

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