Portfolio 4

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Coverage and Timeliness:

Lois Lane Minus Superman...and Intrigue

-Even though our own investigative reports may lack the imagined zest we usually picture with this type of news, I predict the ups and downs we have to look forward to when interviewing.

Picture This

-A slideshow on the New York Times website pictures a Caribbean vacation.  I explore why these images are available on the website as opposed to in the paper.

There Must be a Story Here Somewhere

-Haiman tells us that the public finds journalists unfair when they pursue a story that's not really a story.  As we were all begining the investigative part of our articles, I ask what the next step should be if we discover too late that we've been covering a non-story. 

A Multitude of Multimedia

-The pros and cons of a multimedia site from the Arizona Star.  The amount of information on the site was impressive, but some of the features were too time-consuming to be seen as convenient.

Linking Humor and Voice to Web Articles

-After reading a rather sarcastic article, I explored the author's use of links to embellish his voice in the text. 

Ivy League Material?

-Though I initially issued some harsh criticism of the Harvard News page, I realized that I was being unfair, and was unable to list ways to improve the site.  By the conclusion of my blog, I deemed the Harvard site above average, but admitted I'd expected near perfection from the Ivy League school. 

A Solid Meh

-While I thought the Cavalier Daily was less overwhelming than the Harvard News page, I also thought that the website wasn't anything spectacular.  Here I address some formatting issues that caused confusion. 

Slowly but Surely

-Here I list some links I found useful in my investigative report.   

Some comic-book wisdom for the ages

-Does the press have too much freedom?  53% of America thinks so, but I am not in that majority.  I argue my points in this entry.

 

Depth:

Lois Lane Minus Superman...and Intrigue

-This entry outlines the idealistic view of investigative reporting, and then debunks some of the myths of perpetual intrigue surrounding the field.  I also name some reasons I find this type of journalism exciting and frustrating.

There Must be a Story Here Somewhere

-Though I agree with Haiman when he says that journalists should admit when they don't have a story, I point out some difficulties of letting go.  This blog encourages discussions over the next steps a person should take when they have a deadline to meet, all the footwork done for a story, and no real story. 

Linking Humor and Voice to Web Articles

-Here I not only note the use of links to enrich voice, but the trend of humor I've noticed in internet articles.  I practice what I preach, and use the author's links in my own entry.  

Ivy League Material?

-Instead of just criticizing Harvard's website, I question the reason behind my initial criticism.  This blog contains some soul-searching in which I discover that my expectations were unreasonably high.  I also use many links to pack some information in and make my point. 

Some comic-book wisdom for the ages

-I defend my belief that freedom of the press is sacred, and taking away even a little of that freedom will lead to nothing good.  I also challenge readers to take responsibility for their own news-watching/reading activities, and reward fair sources with their attention.

 

Interaction:

The Backbone of Investigative Journalism--Contacts -Greta Carroll

-Greta discusses the importance of contacts in journalism, and the difficulty of attaining them.  In my comment, I agree whole-heartedly, and give my own thoughts of the problems of finding sources.

Pleasing to the Eye - Angela Palumbo

-Angela talks about an internet article in which Megan Fox is featured.  In my comment, I expand on how the multimedia on the site helped to humanize Fox after a less-than-flattering textual interview.

Pay Attention Please - Michelle Tantlinger

-Michelle links to a site that will help others check the facts of their news sources.  In response to this, I comment on social responsibility regarding the news.

The Press: Non-Essential for Our Lives - Jeanine O'Neal

-Jeanine claims that the press is non-essential, and while I agree with some of the points she makes, I politely disagree with the idea that the news is worthless.

Tokyo Drift - Aja Hannah 

-Aja points out that the press lacks a system of checks and balances, so it should take extreme caution to maintain responsibility.  I agree with her, but say that in some ways the consequences of poor reporting could act as a system of checks and balances, and this would happen if the public would start to reward exemplary journalism.

Integrity Wins Out in the End - Matthew Henderson

-Matt mentions that the public is the force that holds the press accountable, and I agree with him.  I also reply to Jeanine's comment that poor journalism may not fade out in time (she mentions the National Enquirer).  I point out that the Enquirer targets a more specific audience than a regular newspaper, and it has been giving its readers what they want for a long time, so there is no reason to expect it to disappear.

Xenoblogging

A Multitude of Multimedia

-I link to Greta's blog, since she thoroughly discusses the use of videos on a site; an aspect that I merely mention.

Linking Humor and Voice to Web Articles

-Since my entry was about the use of links in an article, I add the links from an internet article to my blog so my readers can appreciate the effect.

Ivy League Material?

-I link to a little bit of everything in this blog: my old high school website, the Harvard news page, Harvard's homepage, the mulitmedia programs I learned to use in high school, my last blog, and I also give Angela a shout-out.

Some comic-book wisdom for the ages

-Here I link to Greta and Michelle's blogs.  Greta also referenced Spiderman's "With great power comes great responsibility" quote, and Michelle gave some ideas on how to check out the reliability of one's news source.

 

Discussion:

There Must be a Story Here Somewhere

-I ended my blog with a question, "What should we do when we dont' have a story, but need to meet a deadline?"  My classmates and I discuss some options, and why we as writers should take the ethical path and just let it go.

Ivy League Material?

-My comments on the Harvard site get a little attention, as my classmates respond to what could've been done to make the site better.

A Solid Meh

-This entry only provoked a brief discussion, but in a comment Derek links to a reflection that my entry inspired. 

Some comic-book wisdom for the ages

-Since many people in this class are either Journalism majors or English majors, freedom of the press is something we are all rather passionate about.  My blog disagreeing with the majority of America that feels the press has too much freedom initiates a conversation among my classmates.

 

Wildcard:

Some comic-book wisdom for the ages

-This blog demonstrates my ability to think beyond statistics, and give reasons for my opinion.  It also shows my understanding of the news and the power of the public in regards to the news.  I feel that this blog really shows my growth throughout the course.

 

 

 

 

 

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