September 30, 2004

Reflection on Annabel Lee

I wasn't sure if we were supposed to post our reflections, but I figured it couldn't hurt anything. I also wanted to comment that I had a really great time with the poetry slam. I've never done anything like that in any of my other classes and, plus, it was something fun and broke the monotany of class.

Reneé DeFloria and Katherine Lambert
American Lit. 1800-1915
Reflection on Poetry Slam
Dr. Dennis Jerz
October 4, 2004

Reflection on Oral Presentation of Annabel Lee

The responses we received were almost completely split down the middle. Half of the class said they loved our presentation, while the other half did not care for our production.
The first half of our responses included comments and suggestions such as: “more movement needed” and “make eye contact and hand gestures.” We felt that our lack of movement would add to the effect of this sad piece of literature, but apparently we were mistaken. We were trying to achieve a dismal and bleak atmosphere through our lack of movement.
On the other hand, many of our classmates enjoyed our interpretation of the poem. Some stated that we showed “good emotion” and respected our use of the different height levels “to show conscience and unconscious,” while others said they “liked it when we fluctuated our voice.”
In conclusion, we have learned that our peers’ opinions are valuable, although they may differ from our own. In our eyes, our poem may not have been perfect but we felt it best reflected Poe’s emotions and thoughts. Next time, although we may think that lack of movement and a dry, unenthusiastic voice may be best, we will keep in mind our classmates’ opinions and use their advice.

Posted by KatherineLambert at September 30, 2004 01:42 PM
Comments

Thanks for posting.

It's always more interesting to watch something that has emotional contrast and life. If you want to put some "down" moments in an oral presentation, stick them between some "up" moments, so that the contrast is important. If the poet had really given up completely, there wouldn't be much to write about.

Posted by: Dennis G. Jerz at October 1, 2004 01:11 AM
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