September 26, 2005

Blogging Portfolio #1

This is my favorite way to complete a cover page - it is more organized, more functional. However, this time I was having some trouble with some of the Track Back links, so beware - this is by no means perfect. Forgive me.

According to dictionary.com, a blog is "a personal Web site that provides updated headlines and news articles of other sites that are of interest to the user, also may include journal entries, commentaries and recommendations compiled by the user." Dictionary.com also offers this definition of the word portfolio, "a portable case for holding material, such as loose papers, photographs, or drawings. The materials collected in such a case, especially when representative of a person's work: a photographer's portfolio; an artist's portfolio of drawings." In this case, a blogging portfolio is the collection of blogged posts that can be linked electronically for added convenience to the reader. The goal of this portfolio is to unite the works we have studied in class with our personal thoughts and analysis. We would also like to illustrate the engaging discussion with our classmates, and others, we are making through the use of blogs.

Explanation of the Collection/Coverage:
This portion of the portfolio contains the representative information that we have studied, it is inclusive of all the entries which are important to demonstrate understanding of the material studied. This portion of the portfolio also represents how the class engages in an electronic conversation by posting responses/comments to the blogs.

This page links to Heart in the Ground, Trifles, Catholic Social Teaching, A Doll House (Acts 1 and 2), The Importance of Being Earnest, Machinal (All), The Jeweler's Shop, Dead Man Walking, Oedipus Rex (All), and Everyman.

Interaction:
This portion of the portfolio is used to illustrate the ongoing use of weblogs as a medium to interact with classmates.

Dead Man Walking - Gina/Katie Knowing the thoughts of these ladies made my interpretation more interesting.


Reflections on the Informal Oral Presentation It is nice to know what is going on in other groups.

Machinal

Discussions:
This section of the blog serves to function as a tool which sparks further examination of the piece of literature at hand.

Machinal sparked a great deal of activity on my blog

Click on the comments posted under "Machinal 1-5" - Katie Lambert and I discussed this as a feminist work.

Dr. Jerz talks about applications of Foster's food theory.

Xenoblogging:
This portion of the portfolio examines the different styles of comments one can post on their peers webblogs. The categories are: the comment primo (first person to comment on one's blog and leave insight), the comment grande (an explanation of thoughts on one's blog entry complete with other URL links), the comment informative (offering a more detailed explanation to a classmate), and the link gracious (giving credit to a classmate who sparked the creative/the cognitive process for you.)

Here, I comment on Chera Pupi's insight into the Catholic Social Teaching as applied to Sister Prejean.

Here, I am the first to ask Kayla Sawyer about the name change in Machinal.

Lorin Schumacher proved to have a wonderful analysis of Oedipus's character flaw.

I asked Andy LoNigro about the difference in town and country - a matter later discussed.

Wildcard:

Though, traditionally, a Wildcard entry should be on one's own personal blog space, I want to post a little conversation that Katie Lambert (this is coming from Katie's blog), and I had about the wonderful freshmen in this class. Katie and I went into class not knowing what was going to happen: it could be odd, we are the only seniors! But, you all have been so wonderful, so full of ideas, and so pleasant to get to know. And, of course, as always, Gina, you are a great person to take literature classes with because you have a good attitude and willingly share insights. :0)

This is my blogging portfolio. Perhaps it will enlighten you, the reader, to the wide world of blogging and the ongoing conversation webblogs can create.

Posted by KatieAikins at September 26, 2005 3:33 PM