Stopping By This Entry On A Rainy Evening

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"The seasons are always the same in literature and yet always different" (Foster 181). 

This sentence, though somewhat contradictory, says a lot.  It seems that most people do associate winter with death and destruction and spring with life and rebirth.  In almost every piece of literature, I can determine the mood based on the weather (which Foster goes on to explain as well).  If it's winter, it will probably be an upsetting story.  If it is spring, it will probably be a joyous story.  I hate it when writers stick to that cliche, though. 

As much as I hate winter, one of my favorite poems is "Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening" by Robert Frost.  The way he describes the evening just makes me want to be there.

"The only other sound's the sweep
Of easy wind and downy flake.

The woods are lovely, dark, and deep" (Frost).

 

Well, easy wind and downy flake does not sound so bad to me, even as a person who hates winter. 

I already know that winter is miserable and cold (don't remind me).  What really impresses me is when a writer can convince me otherwise. 

Weather (haha) you liked my entry or not, you should check out what these people had to say as well.

6 Comments

Stephanie Wytovich said:

I really like how you noted that winter is normally associated with death and despair, just like summer and spring are linked to joy and rebirth. I liked this because even though it is typical in literature to assume that, I have never felt that winter should have such a bad reputation. To me, I think winter is graceful, tranquil, and pure. Now obviously that doesn't apply to every situation, but I think that people need to start thinking out of the box a little with their steorotypes.

Greta Carroll said:

Lauren, I agree that it can get boring when writers stick to clichés, but I am glad you accept that in some cases (like Frost’s poem) it is still appropriate. I think it would be hard as an author to break away from the audience’s conceptions. If you are trying to describe a pretty girl, like Shakespeare was, does describing them as autumn immediately bring to mind a ravishingly beautiful girl? Yet, I agree if the writer is careful and skilled they can break the clichés and still be effective. For example, the girl was as magnificent as the golden foliage of autumn, works pretty well to get the meaning across. The author just needs to be aware of people’s preconceptions, so as not to confuse his/her readers.

Greta Carroll said:

Lauren, I agree that it can get boring when writers stick to clichés, but I am glad you accept that in some cases (like Frost’s poem) it is still appropriate. I think it would be hard as an author to break away from the audience’s conceptions. If you are trying to describe a pretty girl, like Shakespeare was, does describing them as autumn immediately bring to mind a ravishingly beautiful girl? Yet, I agree if the writer is careful and skilled they can break the clichés and still be effective. For example, the girl was as magnificent as the golden foliage of autumn, works pretty well to get the meaning across. The author just needs to be aware of people’s preconceptions, so as not to confuse his/her readers.

Greta Carroll said:

I agree that it can get boring when writers stick to clichés, but I am glad you accept that in some cases (like Frost’s poem) it is still appropriate. I think it would be hard as an author to break away from the audience’s conceptions. If you are trying to describe a pretty girl, like Shakespeare was, does describing them as autumn immediately bring to mind a ravishingly beautiful girl? Yet, I agree if the writer is careful and skilled they can break the clichés and still be effective. For example, the girl was as magnificent as the golden foliage of autumn, works pretty well to get the meaning across. The author just needs to be aware of people’s preconceptions, so as not to confuse his/her readers.

Erica Gearhart said:

Lauren, I really loved your ideas here. Winter is often associated with dealth, coldness, etc.; however this poem was a great example of an author stepping out of the comfort of cliches. I also really like how you included actual lines from the poem you referenced in case someone reading you blog had never come across it. Actually reading it made me want to search for the entire Frost poem. As a side note, I love the idea of putting the quote at the top of your page. It really adds personality to your page.

Greta Carroll said:

Lauren, I agree that it can get boring when writers stick to clichés, but I am glad you accept that in some cases (like Frost’s poem) it is still appropriate. I think it would be hard as an author to break away from the audience’s pre conceptions. If you are trying to describe a pretty girl, like Shakespeare was, does describing them as autumn immediately bring to mind a ravishingly beautiful girl? Yet, I agree if the writer is careful and skilled they can break the clichés and still be effective. For example, the girl was as magnificent as the golden foliage of autumn, works pretty well to get the meaning across. The author just needs to be aware of people’s preconceptions, so as not to confuse his/her readers.

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