THE CRIMSON

| | Comments (0)

After looking through the site, what I liked most were the photographs and videos. they help to tell stories that would be super lame in print, such as, Cambridge is pretty in the fall. Instead, there are pictures that prove to me that Cambridge is pretty in the fall.

http://www.thecrimson.com/gallery/2009/11/19/autumn-cambridge-photoessay/

The pep rally article was kind of stupid. Enough said. Well, that's probably because i would prefer to have watched the band they had at last years pep rally.

http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2009/11/20/harvard-yale-pep-rally/

Readings: Investigative Reporting

| | Comments (0)

I think investigative reporting would be exciting. You might get a good story. You might get beat up for trying to get a story. Who knows?

This takes me back to high school journalism. We had to read "All the President's Men," by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, repoting which helped uncover the watergate scandal, and "Friday Night Lights" by H.G. Bissinger which looks into the high school football scene in Texas. I got really into it. Now, i'm a writing major.

P.S. I have no idea what our current article is supposed to be on. Help?

Can anyone point me in the right direction?

| | Comments (0)

This is a second draft of my Holocaust article. It is short because i still have interviews to do. any thoughts?

 

Over the past few days, students have had the opportunity to talk to Holocaust and genocide experts, educators, and filmmakers. The Ethel Le Frak Holocaust Education Conference showed us what genocide is, and how far it can go. Unfortunately, it is still going on today. In Darfur and other parts of the world, corrupt governments continue to kill their own citizens.

The reason behind these killings: power. These governments want to prove that they hold power, and do so by imposing their will on the innocent. This creates a continuous pattern of violence.

In the film "40 Years of Silence: An Indonesian Tragedy," a young man talks about his witness to violence against his family. He speaks of gaining revenge, saying something like "I want to blow their houses up for what they did to my family." Obviously, he is traumatized. Because of violence against his family, a young man's future is all but lost. These situations need to be stopped before a new generation of violence takes over.

A real solution starts with education. Jason Russo, a teacher from Rochester High School, explained that Holocaust education is an excellent start. The lessons of the Holocaust are universal, and can be applied in other similar situations. It is important to "educate people on the power of hate if left unchecked. If more people know the horror of genocide, they can begin to fight it."

The U.N., who currently tends to genocide issues, is a weakening effort. According to some, the U.N. is corrupt and somebody else needs to step in to ensure a stop to senseless violence. In Darfur, where hundreds of thousands have been killed and millions have fled to refugee camps, the U.S. is making an effort. President Obama is offering incentives to end the violence, and more international pressure if it continues.

Darfur, a region of Sudan about the size of Texas, is home to racially mixed tribes. Farmers and other citizens are being taken out systematically by a government sponsored militia called Janjaweed. 400,000 have been killed, and 2.5 million have been displaced. In 2003, frustrated Darfurians started two rebel groups and started an up rise.

In response, the government gained support from a small Arab militia and launched a "scorched-earth" campaign against the citizens of Darfur.  

Education on genocidal issues is important. Without it, future efforts against these issues will be weak.  Sister Lois Sculco hadn't even heard of the killings in Indonesia until she watched "40 Years...." This goes for many students as well, including Aja Hannah who had this to say:

"So much emphasis is put on the Holocaust and we have the mindset that "now that we know, it will never happen again" except that it does happen. Just last year I learned about Rwanda and Darfur. Where are their stories?"

And their lies the problem: how can we protect the human rights of a people half a world away if we don't know about their struggle?

 

Gonzo: The Life and Times of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson

| | Comments (0)

A documentary from director Alex Gibney that goes deep into the life of Thompson, although I think it could have gone deeper. Don't get me wrong, it is a good film; unfortunatley, it pretty much starts at the Hells Angels portion of his life. I think it would have been better to include some of his childhood stories as well, they are very entertaining.

Johnny Depp narrates Thompson's works throughout, and appearences are made by Tom Wolfe, Jimmy Carter, and George McGovern. There is a lot to be learned from Thompson's life, and it is available in his works as well as in the memory of his close friends and family.

I just sat in on...

| | Comments (0)

A presentation for teachers that want to introduce or improve a Holocaust curriculum in their school.

The first speaker, Dr. Mary E. Haas and her colleague, Dr. Robert A. Waterson, talked about the importance of teaching the Holocaust; she also provided a paper titled "Shotgun Approach to Holocaust Education: Firing it Out, Hoping it Hits and Sticks," which provides strategies and activities for teachers to try on their students.

The second speaker, Jason Russo, a high school teacher, talked about his Holocaust class. He went over the curriculum and named valuable sources for teaching such as a number of books, movies, and documentaries.

 

U.S. Action on Darfur Genocide Situation

| | Comments (0)

There weren't a lot of details put out in the first article I read. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that Sudan is "at a critical juncture, one that can lead to steady improvements in the lives of the Sudanese people or degenerate into more conflict and violence."

This statement came four years after the signing of the "Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) between the government and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM) and ensuring Sudan does not become a haven for violent extremists."

In the 20+ years of this battle between Sudans government and the SPLM, 2 million people have been killed. In 2003, the Sudanese government launched a plan to take out ethnic groups involved in rebellion plots. This alone killed hundreds of thousands. Also, 2.7 million have been displaced from their homes and 250,000 refugees have been produced.

Some plan details:

Clinton- "Assessment of progress and decisions regarding incentives and disincentives will be based on verifiable changes in conditions on the ground. Backsliding by any party will be met with credible pressure in the form of disincentives leveraged by our government and our international partners."

President Obama- "If the Government of Sudan acts to improve the situation on the ground and to advance peace, there will be incentives; if it does not, then there will be increased pressure imposed by the United States and the international community."

 

http://allafrica.com/stories/200910191728.html 

Editorials are cool!

| | Comments (0)

"Unlike news features, an editorial does have a point of view." As far as i'm concerned, that means I can be creative and tell a story as long as it pertains to the information i'm trying to communicate.

"Presume that your opponent has good reasons for disagreeing with you. Talk to people on the other side, and include some of their eloquent, well-argued points." This would give readers a better reason to trust your opinion, if you're able to convince them to join your side of the argument.

BAM!

 


 

Welcome to your Seton Hill University weblog.

The web address "http://blogs.setonhill.edu/FirstnameLastname" is where your most recent entries will appear. New entries will appear at the top of this page, and older entries will slide down the page and eventually move to an archive.

To create and edit entries on your site, go to blogs.setonhill.edu, and log in with your blog username and password. (You'll need to get that information from a blog administrator. Contact me, Dennis Jerz, for help.)

I have posted a welcome message on the New Media Journalism weblog, which has links to tutorials and troubleshooting guides.

Blogroll

| | Comments (0)

November 2009

Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 [13] 14
15 16 17 18 19 [20] 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30          

THE CRIMSON

After looking through the site, what I liked most were the photographs and videos. they help to tell stories that would be super lame in print, such as, Cambridge is pretty in the fall. Instead, there are pictures that prove to me that Cambridge is pretty in the fall.

http://www.thecrimson.com/gallery/2009/11/19/autumn-cambridge-photoessay/

The pep rally article was kind of stupid. Enough said. Well, that's probably because i would prefer to have watched the band they had at last years pep rally.

http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2009/11/20/harvard-yale-pep-rally/

Readings: Investigative Reporting

I think investigative reporting would be exciting. You might get a good story. You might get beat up for trying to get a story. Who knows?

This takes me back to high school journalism. We had to read "All the President's Men," by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, repoting which helped uncover the watergate scandal, and "Friday Night Lights" by H.G. Bissinger which looks into the high school football scene in Texas. I got really into it. Now, i'm a writing major.

P.S. I have no idea what our current article is supposed to be on. Help?

Can anyone point me in the right direction?

This is a second draft of my Holocaust article. It is short because i still have interviews to do. any thoughts?

 

Over the past few days, students have had the opportunity to talk to Holocaust and genocide experts, educators, and filmmakers. The Ethel Le Frak Holocaust Education Conference showed us what genocide is, and how far it can go. Unfortunately, it is still going on today. In Darfur and other parts of the world, corrupt governments continue to kill their own citizens.

The reason behind these killings: power. These governments want to prove that they hold power, and do so by imposing their will on the innocent. This creates a continuous pattern of violence.

In the film "40 Years of Silence: An Indonesian Tragedy," a young man talks about his witness to violence against his family. He speaks of gaining revenge, saying something like "I want to blow their houses up for what they did to my family." Obviously, he is traumatized. Because of violence against his family, a young man's future is all but lost. These situations need to be stopped before a new generation of violence takes over.

A real solution starts with education. Jason Russo, a teacher from Rochester High School, explained that Holocaust education is an excellent start. The lessons of the Holocaust are universal, and can be applied in other similar situations. It is important to "educate people on the power of hate if left unchecked. If more people know the horror of genocide, they can begin to fight it."

The U.N., who currently tends to genocide issues, is a weakening effort. According to some, the U.N. is corrupt and somebody else needs to step in to ensure a stop to senseless violence. In Darfur, where hundreds of thousands have been killed and millions have fled to refugee camps, the U.S. is making an effort. President Obama is offering incentives to end the violence, and more international pressure if it continues.

Darfur, a region of Sudan about the size of Texas, is home to racially mixed tribes. Farmers and other citizens are being taken out systematically by a government sponsored militia called Janjaweed. 400,000 have been killed, and 2.5 million have been displaced. In 2003, frustrated Darfurians started two rebel groups and started an up rise.

In response, the government gained support from a small Arab militia and launched a "scorched-earth" campaign against the citizens of Darfur.  

Education on genocidal issues is important. Without it, future efforts against these issues will be weak.  Sister Lois Sculco hadn't even heard of the killings in Indonesia until she watched "40 Years...." This goes for many students as well, including Aja Hannah who had this to say:

"So much emphasis is put on the Holocaust and we have the mindset that "now that we know, it will never happen again" except that it does happen. Just last year I learned about Rwanda and Darfur. Where are their stories?"

And their lies the problem: how can we protect the human rights of a people half a world away if we don't know about their struggle?

 

Gonzo: The Life and Times of Dr. Hunter S. Thompson

A documentary from director Alex Gibney that goes deep into the life of Thompson, although I think it could have gone deeper. Don't get me wrong, it is a good film; unfortunatley, it pretty much starts at the Hells Angels portion of his life. I think it would have been better to include some of his childhood stories as well, they are very entertaining.

Johnny Depp narrates Thompson's works throughout, and appearences are made by Tom Wolfe, Jimmy Carter, and George McGovern. There is a lot to be learned from Thompson's life, and it is available in his works as well as in the memory of his close friends and family.

I just sat in on...

A presentation for teachers that want to introduce or improve a Holocaust curriculum in their school.

The first speaker, Dr. Mary E. Haas and her colleague, Dr. Robert A. Waterson, talked about the importance of teaching the Holocaust; she also provided a paper titled "Shotgun Approach to Holocaust Education: Firing it Out, Hoping it Hits and Sticks," which provides strategies and activities for teachers to try on their students.

The second speaker, Jason Russo, a high school teacher, talked about his Holocaust class. He went over the curriculum and named valuable sources for teaching such as a number of books, movies, and documentaries.

 

U.S. Action on Darfur Genocide Situation

There weren't a lot of details put out in the first article I read. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said that Sudan is "at a critical juncture, one that can lead to steady improvements in the lives of the Sudanese people or degenerate into more conflict and violence."

This statement came four years after the signing of the "Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) between the government and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement (SPLM) and ensuring Sudan does not become a haven for violent extremists."

In the 20+ years of this battle between Sudans government and the SPLM, 2 million people have been killed. In 2003, the Sudanese government launched a plan to take out ethnic groups involved in rebellion plots. This alone killed hundreds of thousands. Also, 2.7 million have been displaced from their homes and 250,000 refugees have been produced.

Some plan details:

Clinton- "Assessment of progress and decisions regarding incentives and disincentives will be based on verifiable changes in conditions on the ground. Backsliding by any party will be met with credible pressure in the form of disincentives leveraged by our government and our international partners."

President Obama- "If the Government of Sudan acts to improve the situation on the ground and to advance peace, there will be incentives; if it does not, then there will be increased pressure imposed by the United States and the international community."

 

http://allafrica.com/stories/200910191728.html 

Editorials are cool!

"Unlike news features, an editorial does have a point of view." As far as i'm concerned, that means I can be creative and tell a story as long as it pertains to the information i'm trying to communicate.

"Presume that your opponent has good reasons for disagreeing with you. Talk to people on the other side, and include some of their eloquent, well-argued points." This would give readers a better reason to trust your opinion, if you're able to convince them to join your side of the argument.

BAM!

 


 

Blogroll

WordPress Appliance - Powered by TurnKey Linux