February 2008 Archives

Remember That?

| | Comments (2)

"An allusion is a passing reference in a work of literature to another literary or historical work, figure, or event, to a literary passage" (Hamilton 74).

I always found allusions very helpful and interesting when reading a literary work. I love the idea of being able to connect one thing to another in order to make better sense, engage the reader, or provoke questions. Personally, allusions always capture my attention intensely and make me think deeper because I want to figure out why it is that that was alluded. Allusions can bring you back to a previous literary work you've studied which could help you find a similar idea, just with more insight.

Always Unsatisfied with this Burning Desire

| | Comments (1)

"'A body and a spirit,' he repeated. 'The body, lady, is like a house: it don't go anywhere; but the spirit, lady, is like a automobile, always on the move, always...'" (O'Conner 57).

When I read this passage, I thought of how all of us as human beings have a spirituality that drives us toward our desires, whether it be one or many. When he says that his spirit is always moving, I think that means that he is never satisfied. We are all like that. We're truly never satisfied. We have a desire within us and what we do with it is exactly our spirituality. Also, what we do with our spirituality affects our bodies. We could hurt, help, or heal them with our spirituality.

Pathetic?

| | Comments (0)

"Pathetic fallacy is a special type of personification, in which inanimate aspects of nature, such as the landscape or the weather, are represented as having human qualities or feelings" (Hamilton 40)."

I never heard this term before so I did learn something new from reading this section. I didn't understand why it would be called "pathetic," maybe because the personification wasn't very in depth, like saying it's a sunny day doesn't always imply that the mood is happy or calm.

Pain is Always Too Real

| | Comments (0)

"'What lies have you been telling today, honey?' He shut his eye and heard her voice from a long way away, as if he were under the river and she on top of it" (O'Conner 41).

I feel very sad for this little boy because this passage shows how much emotional pain he is in. For being so young, this is outrageous. His parents don't show him much attention and also have serious issues of their own. This little boy is not stupid and can see that. The whole experience of going to the river with Mrs. Connin was something so memorable for him and something that he saw as a saving grace. His mother was his pain and because of that, he just wanted to be saved and throw that pain away. The river came to his mind because the preacher said that the river is where you throw your pain in. This little boy was obviously very lost because he didn't even tell his real name. He wanted to escape in any way that he could. Emotional pain can be just as bad, if not worse than physical pain because it takes over your spirit and sense of happiness. You can lose hope and feel as though you just want to run away, but that place to run to is eternal. This is what I saw in this little boy. This passage clearly shows his pain because he was in another world. He was thinking of the saving river and her words not being there to harm him.

Looking Back and Finding Ideas

| | Comments (0)

Hello, my name is Richelle Dodaro and I am a freshman at Seton Hill University. I am an English major seeking teacher certification in elementary education. Here you have the opportunity to view my blogging from my Introduction to Literary Study course. In this class, students have assigned readings to do, which include poems, plays, short stories, and parts from novels. After students have completed their reading, they post a blog entry on blogs.setonhill.edu that include a quote that stood out to them and an explanation on why it did so and what it means to them. I hope you enjoy my blogs!

Coverage

Death Does Not Control Life - I wanted the reader to be able to go back and read the poem I was commenting on. Also, I think it is a very intense poem that people should consider.

The Mind's Impact - this is the first entry that I linked it back to the original entry.

Timeliness

The All-Around-the-World Major - This was our first assignment for blogging and I was so excited to start the reading and post my blog that I did it as soon as possible!

Interaction

Our Own Symbols - I elaborated on Ally Hall's blog entry that stated people should be able to come up with their own meanings for symbols or else we will not learn anything.

What is A Love Song? - I did not state this in my entry, but what I was writing was referring to Lauren Miller's blog on the sonnets. She did not think the poems were love songs because there was no positivity throughout them. In my blog, I talk about how love involves negativity as well.

Depth

Misdirected Self Esteem - the link would not work for this but here I talk about the pressures put on girls today

This quote stood out to me because it shows the dilemma many women go through which is knowing whether men like them or not. Parents, friends, or other family members tend to reassure the girl that men only like the girls who "cheapen" themselves; that they respect girls like Bernice, who don't "put themselves out there." These advisors want the girl to stay away from engagements with different men not only for their own benefit, but so the girl will have better self-esteem because it will not be based on how many men she has been with. I don't necessarily agree with this typical advice, but I understand that it is what many girls hear when they are upset about men or boys in this way. I don't think self-esteem should be based upon how many men or boys a female has been with or simply talked to. However, I think it is unfair to say that males do not respect females who may be more outgoing or sexual in their nature.

To Everything There is A Season - When we hear spring, we think of birth or renewal. In my blog, I find new meanings to the seaons within literature.

Loves Makes the World Go 'Round - the link would not work for this, but here I compare fish to women, which may sound silly, but once you understand the context, it makes sense.

"Evans: The dozen white louses do become an old coat well. It agrees well, passant; it is a familiar beast to man, and signifies love."

I looked at the meaning of the word "louses" and it means fish. I think fish is used here because he is talking about something to catch, in this case, women, or love. Even if the person is boring or seems hopeless, love, or lust for that matter, can somewhat improve them, in a very distorted way. It is distorted because this person is being made more worthy or important if they are with someone or not. This thing that they are trying to catch is something that people have a love/hate relationship with. This thing is either the opposite sex, sex in general, or marriage. Within these three ideas, love is involved, whether in a caring or lustful way. It may a bit of a stretch to say that love is involved in lust, but I think it is to a certain extent because with lust comes a sense of passion, and passion is an aspect of love.

Love is Blind - In this entry, I talk about the unique way of complimenting your lover and I answer to my own confusion with this sonnet by Shakespeare.

Discussion

Hello Ugly! You're Looking Beautiful Today! - I responded to Jeannine O'Niel's blog because I enjoyed her comparison between the poem and boyfriends' comments.

More Blogs

The Caged Bird

This is How I Feel

The Eye-Catcher

Will Power

A Good Woman

The Footman

Dead Victory

Spiritual Victory

Is Death Peaceful?

Talk the Talk, Can't Walk the Walk

Much Ado About Nothing

Thank you so much for reading my blogs! I hope they stimulated new ideas for you!

 

 

The All-Around-the-World Major

| | Comments (1)

While a major in English does not prepare you for any specific occupation, it does provide training in critical thinking" (Lemire 8).

This quote stood out to me because it sets the starting point for the English major's versitality. I think critical thinking is very important and can benefit any occupation a person may choose. A major in English doesn't prepare you for one particular occupation; it prepares you for life and any occupation that suits your likes, strengths, and abilities.

"Much Ado About Nothing"

| | Comments (2)

"Mrs. Page: Well, I will muse no further. Master Fenton, Heaven give you many, many merry days! Good husband, let us every one go home, and laugh this sport o'er by a country fire; Sir John and all."

This quote basically ended the play and I liked its comedic aspect. It led to a feeling of relief that every one could be civil with one another. This quote reminded me of the end of Shakespeare's "Much Ado About Nothing" because that play also involved a comedic conflict between the sexes and ended with a fairly happy quote. This type of ending makes the reader feel like all that trouble was a big joke and that the turmoil that the characters went through was unnecessary. Then again, if there had been no turmoil, then there would have been no story. The line within the quote above from MWW that made me feel like everything was "okay" was "let us every one go home, and laugh this sport o'er a country fire." The key word here is "laugh." This also reminded me of family conflicts: the family schemes against one another, doesn't talk, and fights, but then comes to an understanding, or not an understanding, and realizes how stupid the issue really was.

What is a Love Song?

| | Comments (1)

"Both poems are 'love songs' (obviously both Donne and Eliot use song in their titles) uttered in the courtly love tradition by personas who view male-female relationships warily"

 

The key word within this passage is "warily." The writers are not viewing love as safe and something completely positive; they know that they need to watch themselves from fear of being hurt or rejected. Maybe they are love songs, maybe they're not. I don't think that we should just assume they are because the word song is in the titles. Let's say that they are love songs. A love song doesn't always have to be happy. A love song can involve a heartbreak, confusion, or conflicts. I'm not sure that I agree with the fact that they are for sure love songs, but I do agree that both writers are looking at love defensively.

Talk the Talk, Can't Walk the Walk

| | Comments (0)

"For revenged I will be, as sure as his guts are made of puddings."

I think this is showing that he is weak and isn't really going to do anything if he feels intimidated. He's very clear about this, which is strange, because most people who act like they will stand up for themselves or others, won't usually say that is the case. He is saying that he will be revengeful as long as he is "soft" or weak in a sense. So, his whole idea really doesn't make sense.

Love Makes the World Go 'Round

| | Comments (0)

"Evans: The dozen white louses do become an old coat well. It agrees well, passant; it is a familiar beast to man, and signifies love."

I looked at the meaning of the word "louses" and it means fish. I think fish is used here because he is talking about something to catch, in this case, women, or love. Even if the person is boring or seems hopeless, love, or lust for that matter, can somewhat improve them, in a very distorted way. It is distorted because this person is being made more worthy or important if they are with someone or not. This thing that they are trying to catch is something that people have a love/hate relationship with. This thing is either the opposite sex, sex in general, or marriage. Within these three ideas, love is involved, whether in a caring or lustful way. It may a bit of a stretch to say that love is involved in lust, but I think it is to a certain extent because with lust comes a sense of passion, and passion is an aspect of love.

Death Does Not Control Life

| | Comments (0)

"Death be not proud, though some have called thee mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so, for those whom thou think'st thou dost overthrow."

This passage really struck me because it shows the author's fearlessness towards death. He's making it clear that he is going to live his life without a fear of death. If he lets the power of death overcome him, then he is basically not living. He is going to live his life to the fullest and not let the thought of death ruin that. I think this statement is very bold because I know personally that death can be a scary thing to think about, and to say that death is not so powerful is kind of scary because it's almost like cursing yourself due to over-confidence. The main idea, however, that I think Donne is trying to convey is that we should not look at death as something that controls our lives or scary. We should control our own lives.

Love is Blind

| | Comments (0)

"My mistress' eyes are nothing like the sun; coral is far more red than her lips' red: if snow be white, why then her breasts are dun; if hairs be wires, black wires grow on her head."

 

At first when I read this sonnet, I felt as though he was saying his mistress wasn't good enough, that there are other things better than those that she possesses. The lines that made me feel this way were "coral is far more red than her lips' red" and "if snow be white, why then are breasts are dun." Coral is not red, so if coral is more red than her lips, then her lips must not be red at all. But maybe this is a good thing because red doesn't tend to be a natural color on lips, pink is more of the color. "Dun" refers to a dull grayish brown, which is definitely not a compliment, so that made me feel that he was putting her down. I looked more closely and thought well maybe he is saying that if white is snow, and it can't represent her, well there isn't anything more white than snow, so what else could he say. She is more beautiful to him than snow, but if snow is as white as it gets, then where else can he go? To him, the whiteness of snow just doesn't measure up to her beauty so he can't compare her with that. Her eyes as well can't be compared with the sun for the same reasons. Basically, these phrases that seemed like insults to me were just his way of saying she is better than the given examples, such as the sun, wires, snow, and coral.  

Is Death Peaceful?

| | Comments (0)

"We passed the school where children played   
At wrestling in a ring;                                  
We passed the fields of gazing grain,   
We passed the setting sun." (from Because I Could Not Stop For Death)

This passage brought an image to me of Dickinson reflecting on her past. I saw death here as something peaceful and as a new beginning, not a harsh ending. The whole tone of this passage is calm and quiet. It doesn't show a dark side to me, just simple truth and awareness of her life. She's ready to confront death and is not afraid.

Spiritual Victory

| | Comments (0)
Victory is not so much what you get physically, but it is something you feel inside. This is why Dickinson's poem was so sad to me, because the soldiers didn't get to feel that sense of pride and joy. Once we are able to feel that joy from victory, we can desire more, yet also feeling more complete. We would feel as though we accomplished something within ourselves.

Dead Victory

| | Comments (0)
This passage from Dickinson's poem portrayed a feeling of loss and extreme disappointment. Dickinson was expressing her sadness and experience of those who could not physically feel their victory. She wishes that they could have, and doesn't ask for much, just at least a little bit. This passage can apply to the well known question: "why do bad things happen to good people?" We as human beings cannot help but to ask why because we feel how unfair it is. We realize we cannot have it all, but we just want a little bit of happiness.

The Footman

| | Comments (1)
This passage stood out for me because of the capitalization of the word "footman." I'm thinking the narrator is speaking of God, or some other Supreme Being, because earlier on he talks about going bald and I think the whole poem is about him reflecting on his life, or maybe life in general. Anyway, this quote means to me that he is worried about how he will be judged.

Our Own Symbols

| | Comments (0)

"Different time, different place, same medtation upon greed, gratitude, miscalculation, and love. Titles? William Faulkner liked The Sound and The Fury. Aldous Huxley decided on Brave New World. Agatha Christie chose By the Picking of My Thumbs, which statement Ray Bradbury completed with Something Wicked This Way Comes."

I think that is what is so liberating about literature; the fact that the author provides his or her own meanings, we read them, and interpret them in our own way due to our experiences and that can lead to a strengthening of one's self or intellect. I like how people can bring together their ideas on symbols and then eventually come to some sort of conclusion. Sometimes there may not even be a conclusion, just a realization of the significance of that particular symbol.

A Good Woman

| | Comments (0)

In this story, the main idea or theme is about a good man, but it ends with the Misfit mentioning a good woman, so this passage stood out to me in that way. The grandmother was a good woman because she was so young at heart, wanted everyone to hear her advice or knowledge, and wanted to see the good in every person. She did this with the Misfit when she continuously told him he should pray, that he wouldn't shoot a lady, that he is a good man. Maybe she wasn't trying to see the good in him, since at the beginning she spoke nothing positive of him, maybe she was just saying that for her own benefit. Or she could have seen something different now meeting him in person. Whatever it is, she was trying to see something good. In return, the Misfit saw something good as well in his eyes, but he couldn't handle the truth she spoke. It showed his corrupt personality and the truth within O'Conner's title.

Will Power

| | Comments (0)
I liked this quote because it really showed the power of William Shakespeare's works. It shows that writers all have different interpretations of his works, and that his works can be redone over and over with different titles. The impact is just amazing to me. All of the titles work well with the story, and each time, we are introduced to a new idea that can continue those before, or be a new beginning.

The Eye-Catcher

| | Comments (0)

"In today's fast-moving world, the first sentence of your short story should catch your reader's attention with the unusual, the unexpected, an action, or a conflict. Begin with tension and immediacy. Remember that short stories need to start close to their end."

This quote struck me because I always find that beginning the story with something that immediately catches the readers is difficult. I know that it is important because when I read, I don't want to continue if the beginning is boring and feels as though it is not going anywhere. The beginning should be interesting and something that has you hooked right away. It should start off with some mystery, not just telling the story from start to end right there.

This is How I Feel

| | Comments (2)

"Lyric poetry, the most varied and widespread kind, is that in which an individual speaker expresses what he or she feels, perceives, and thinks" (14).

When I write my own poetry, mine most definitely falls under lyric poetry. I'm just saying what I feel and expressing ideas whether I am in a good or bad mood. I like to read this kind of poetry because it allows me to feel a connection with the poet.

To Everything There Is A Season...

| | Comments (0)
I like this particular quote because it shows our natural poetic analysis of the four seasons. I think that is what is so beautiful about the seasons; the fact that they can be used so metaphorically in work of literature. Most of us do associate a specific season with a specific feeling, but we can be tricked or directed a different way. We shouldn't look at things in just one way, and that is what Foster is saying here. Overall, I really like the idea of seasons within a literary work. I think they make the specific idea a writer is trying to convey more vivid in readers' minds.

The Caged Bird

| | Comments (1)

"MRS. HALE. She--come to think of it, she was kind of like a bird herself--real sweet and pretty, but kind of timid and--fluttery. How--she--did--change."

When I hear of a caged bird, I immediatly think of Maya Angelou's poem and how it spoke so truthfully that with pain one finds their one sense of happiness, or freedom. Mrs. Hale compared Mrs. Wright to a bird, saying she was "real sweet and pretty, but kind of timid--and fluttery." Mrs. Wright looked fine when she was out in public because she felt trapped. Deep down she must have been very sad, but she hid that because she masked a happy face until she went back home. For a bird, home is when everyone stops looking at you. Mrs. Wright sang her own song at home, but was still nervous and just trying to escape her sadness.

Misdirected Self-Esteem

| | Comments (1)
This quote stood out to me because it shows the dilemma many women go through which is knowing whether men like them or not. Parents, friends, or other family members tend to reassure the girl that men only like the girls who "cheapen" themselves; that they respect girls like Bernice, who don't "put themselves out there." These advisors want the girl to stay away from engagements with different men not only for their own benefit, but so the girl will have better self-esteem because it will not be based on how many men she has been with. I don't necessarily agree with this typical advice, but I understand that it is what many girls hear when they are upset about men or boys in this way. I don't think self-esteem should be based upon how many men or boys a female has been with or simply talked to. However, I think it is unfair to say that males do not respect females who may be more outgoing or sexual in their nature.

The Mind's Impact

| | Comments (0)
I thought this quote was important because it helps readers to almost get inside the minds of writers and to feel a connection between other writers and themselves. Everything we write is because of our experiences and I think this helps to make a connection between beginning readers and writers. I also like this quote because I know it defintely related to me because what I write is personal, whether it be unconcious or conscious. This quote is reassuring because it shows that novels or plays we read by certain writers are not so beyond our reach; those writers are human too, piecing together their creativity and experiences.

Recent Comments

Dennis G. Jerz on Who did What?: I'm glad to know that you're a
Dennis G. Jerz on First : "Because he threw a curveball
Greta Carroll on That Magical Place, but there is no magical place: I agree completely with you, R
Dennis G. Jerz on Out of Order: Juliana, if you are writing fo
Kaitlin Monier on Out of Order: I understand where you are com
Juliana Cox on Out of Order: This is very true. Like you sa
Dennis G. Jerz on Small Job=Big Appreciation: Richelle, don't forget to crea
Stormy Knight on Remember That?: Richelle, Sorry to bother you
Stephanie Wytovich on Remember That?: I agree Richelle! I love gett
Erica Gearhart on Always Unsatisfied with this Burning Desire: Richelle, I absolutely agree w