First Dickinson... Now Donne! Someone get these people a cookie!

| | Comments (5)
"Death, be not proud, though some have called thee
Mighty and dreadful, for thou art not so(Holy Sonnets: Death, be not proud)."
 
Wow, if Emily Dickinson doesn't get the message about death across, then John Doone surley will.  I hate to burst Emily's bubble, but I think Doone is a tad bit more dark and morose than she is.  But who knows, maybe that will be a compliment.
 
In the quote that I chose, it is exhuming the same message that Dickinson portrayed in her last poem we read for class.  They both are looking at death as a welcoming force rather than one to be afarid of.  Death is only the beginning of a new life in their eyes.  It leads to ones spiritual life as an immortal in the arms of heaven.
 
 "...then from thee much more must flow,
 And soonest our best men with thee do go..."
 
What is interesting about this poem is that is exclaims that even the bravest of men will perish.  We do not have a choice when we will die, or who will die first.  Death will reign over ones body whether they like it or not.  It has an almost saracatic, hahaha you lose, type of attitude to it.  That's why I think that it comes across as darker than Dickinson's
 
..."One short sleep past, we wake eternally,
And death shall be no more; Death, thou shalt die.."
 
Death must be accepted.  Whether it is through fear or through acceptance.  Death is only the beginning. It shall not die. It is immortal.
 
 

5 Comments

Erica Gearhart said:

I really liked your comparrison and analysis here (as well as you title!). I agree that they are both discussing the concept of life after death. Although talking about death is a little dark, I think that their writing is just a way for them to understand and accept death. Kind of like how some people do not take children to a funeral home until they are older. The only problem with this is that then it is actually someone who they knew for a long time and were close to. I think it is better to be open to experiences and understanding, just as Donne and Dickinson were, when dealing with a subject like death than to keep it bottled up or hidden.

Jeanine O'Neal said:

You may say death shall not die, but Donne has a different opinion. His finally line says, "Death, thou shalt die." I actually picked this line for my blog entry. So, if you want to see what I wrote you can always click this link:

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JeanineONeal/2008/02/die_death_die.html

Angelica Guzzo said:

I agree that Donne is saying not to fear death. Nice idea comparing Donne to Dickinson. You're right we don't choose when we go and death is a way for us to become imortal.

First of all, great title.
"What is interesting about this poem is that is exclaims that even the bravest of men will perish. We do not have a choice when we will die, or who will die first."
I completely agree with your opinion here. Death has a certain amount of control over us, concerning when and how we will die, but in the poem, Donne also mentions that there are some things that have control over death:
"Thou art slave to fate, chance, kings, and desperate men," (Donne 9).
I think that this creates for us a sense of a higher power than death, which makes death seem even weaker.

Wow Steph Wytovich, you're a deep one...

"Death must be accepted. Whether it is through fear or through acceptance. Death is only the beginning. It shall not die. It is immortal."

Well put kid - I think that everyone has to notice though that death is going to happen, but also just because people write about it that doesn't make them crazy or need medication. Just that they can accept it and that they can use it for good writing.

Leave a comment


Type the characters you see in the picture above.