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Richly linked blog entry

“Now instead of burdening your reader with the task of looking up the other document, you can simply link to the article” (Pg. 409).
Linking is half the hassle as understanding a footnote and checking that book and document for further information. Linking is also a quick and easy way to provide additional information for those who don't understand things on the internet or any topic easily. By clicking on the additional link, you can gain more knowledge of a topic or link to an uncommon word or phrase referenced in a larger article. By clicking here, you will learn how to link.
Referring back to chapter 7 where the main blogging begins is where you can find how to make long phrase into a link. Just as I had done above with “clicking here,” links you to a page. The word “here” takes you there. “This strategy often allows for more attractive visual design than is possible with lengthy links.
“Furthermore, it gives users the option of skipping the supplementary text if the link gives them enough information about the destination”
(Farkas and Farkas, 2000).
To demonstrate shortening links, I will use this example: If I am a baseball coach, and I am making a web site for my team. I will post scheduling as well as a link to an additional site to buy sporting equipment.
Parents:
Equipment for the players must be a certain brand name, size, and should be authorized. To find the right equipment, I recommend Dicks Sporting Goods. You may order anything you need online or shop personally at their stores.

*Short links look much nicer on the page; however you can also link the whole sentence:

Equipment for the players must be a certain brand name, size, and be authorized. To find the right equipment, I recommend Dicks Sporting Goods. You may order anything you need online or shop personally at their stores.

Linking is a very useful way to provide additional information. There are many ways to be creative with a link. You could use a direct quote as a link. For example: “It is a rare disease here, and possibly an emerging disease,” said Almira Jane Leslie. This is a direct quote to a story about Australian fungus. By clicking on it, takes you to the entire article in which this is stated. This is also citing the source you borrowed it from.

Other facts about quotes: “People like to talk, and they like to read anything in quotation marks. The more your story suggests a back-and-forth conversation, the better. So polish up those quotation marks” (Pg. 377).
When I read quotes online, it makes me read farther into it, because you want to know if the conversation is legitimate in information or if their opinion is worthy. Having quotes can give different sorts of information, whether it be fact or opinion. Therefore, I am more curious to see what that person is talking about. If you have regular type, minus the quotes, you pretty much just assume they are stating facts, and sometimes, you’re looking for opinion, as a way to connect your thoughts to someone else’s.
In agreement to my blog, Karissa posted her thoughts about quoting: “I agree with you about quotes contributing to the conversation on the web. I have a problem, however, when quotes are used pointlessly (journalism has a lot to say about useful quotes) or not attributed to an individual. If the point is to make the site more real with real words from a real human, tell me who that human is even if it's just a first name!.”

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Comments

Nicely done my young journalist friend. Your examples are right on the money.

I liked the way you presented examples to prove your ideas...Very nice format, too!

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