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If at first you don't succeed, try try again

While I was reading through chapter 6 in IANS, I came across the section of denying the Holocaust. The conducted poll came out with results claiming 22% of Americans believe the Holocaust never happened. When you get a statistic like this. You have to question where this information came from. If all turns out accurate, you need to ask......what question was actually asked to get these results. As it turns out, the question contained a double negative, "Does it seem possible, or does it seem impossible to you that the Nazi extermination of the Jews never happened." Now, as a English/Journalism critic, RED FLAGS should pop up. The question was too confusing. When it was reworded, the poll results changed only 1% denial rate.
However, what really caught my attention about this incident was Roper apologized for it, "I deeply regret this entire incident, and i feel it most important to set the record straight publicly."
It takes a really strong person to admit a mistake that affected America's integrity and appologized publicly. This shows an honorable act that we as learning journalists can learn from ourselves.
We know the first time around is not going to be perfect, so when you do mess up, make up for it and try it agian.

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Comments

So true, It is always important to admit when you are wrong. People will forgive you-duh we are all human-so it was important for Roper to admit he made a mistake and make up for it. By re-surveying and making the question clear we are able to get a better public response.

Now all we have to do is make sure the journalist who may have wrote on the information from the first story realize they should have looked at the question and figured the numbers couldn't have been accurate! Then the apology would just be a minor deal not a "Sorry EVERYONE who thought that many people didn't believe in the Holocaust" thing.

I completely agree with you in that it takes a strong person to admit that they were wrong, mislead a bunch of people, and ultimately marred America’s character. Yep! Keep on going; it can’t get any worse!

How can someone deny that the Hollocaust never happened? That's sick because it did. To exterminate almost an entire race takes just one super group of uneducated people and turns them into the anti-christ. Woonder what question was asked to get a response like so?

The whole issue of people denying the Holocaust was always very suspcious to me. How could a person deny that 6 million people were killed, especially with all the proof? The key in asking this question was the word "never". Had this word been omitted, the question probably would not have been nearly as confusing.

I do think also that Roper had the guts to publicly admit he was wrong.As much as we try to avoid them, mistakes in journalism are made. That is why retractions exist. But make sure what you are asking is clear.

This brings up the idea of phrasing questions in a difficult way on purpose in order to get the desired results from a survey. While the author of the Holocaust survey appologized, I'm sure not all political surveys are as honest. Surveys have always brought up red flags for me, because I understand how easily the numbers and questions can be manipulated in order to produce the desired results.

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