January 2008 Archives

EX 4: Article Analysis- Addiction

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  1. Quote the author's main thesis.

"Although the vast majority of studies undertaking the examination of electronic games and the emergence of a gaming culture deny that games are addictive, a stereotype of the game player as addicted continues to circulate in various strands of ego-psychology and pedagogical study and, with greater force and political affect, in popular culture, news media and governmental rhetoric."

  1. What evidence does the author use in order to support the main idea?

"However, it does remain a fact that the stereotyping of gameplay as addictive continues, and it comes into play in submissions to censorship boards in various countries, it informs government ministers and politicians and lawmakers in their attitude to gaming, it has discernible indirect effects on industry and development funding, it is related to the capacity to study gaming-and to fund that study-within universities and it relates to self-attitudes to gameplay."

"New technologies have frequently been the subject of anxiety and apprehension, particularly in popular culture representations in films such as The Matrix or television series such as The X-Files (Cooper, 2002)."

"Rather, a thorough body of work that addresses the concerns that gaming is addictive is needed, and particularly work that broadens the scope of gaming by utilising cultural studies and uses/ gratifications notions in favour of an overly simplistic technological determinist understanding of the emergence of contemporary game culture"

"The transference of addiction rhetoric to discourses relating activities that may require repetitiveness or even have compulsive qualities is not limited to games, but has been similarly applied to gambling (Griffiths, 1998), sexual compulsion (Young, 1998) and pornography use (Pornography & Sexual Violence, 1983) among others"

" the medical and scientific discourses around chemical drugs, addiction is often defined either as processual behavioural change related to repetitive experience in socio-psychological disciplines, or neuroadaption to stimulation (such as psychoactive chemicals) among the more biochemically-oriented understandings of addiction. Either way, any concept of addiction involves a notion of behaviour change and a desire for or experience of repetition."

"It is variously one or several of these concepts that are used in digital addiction rhetoric to produce the figure or personage of the "frequent" or "heavy-use" game player as suffering an addiction, as an addict. Often this is seen simultaneously as a psychological disorder and through a model in which addiction is determined through that to which one is addicted-digital media in this case (e.g., Holliday, 2000)."

"In an interview on the cultural semiotics and connotations of drug use and dependence, Jacques Derrida refers to a notion of the "diction" of "addiction" as a set of significatory characteristics that are applied to drug users and which bind the applicant within a particular set of ideological and political valencies (Derrida, 1995)."

 

  1. What are the sources for the author's presentation of evidence that works against the author's thesis

"Lister et al (2003), indicate a dichotomy between computer-mediated communication forms (CMC) and videogames that is supported by several of the following binaries: creative content versus mindless entertainment; adult users versus youth consumers; fluid identity versus hypermasculinity; sociality versus commodified space; tool versus toy"

"Addiction is sometimes presented as an experience of moral disorder, a physical failing, a social failing, or as an infectious disease that must be contained or monitored for fear of spreading addiction from one body to another (Lart, 1998)"

"The US Congress in both 2000 and 2002 discussed legislation to limit violent content and more tightly regulate video games; in Australia a restricted (to adults) classification of games for those which would ordinarily be banned was opposed amidst a vocal lobby and a media moral panic; in New Zealand, the PlayStation 2 game Manhunt was recently banned by chief censor in the Film and Literature Office Bill Hastings on the basis that it was violence per se, not gameplay (InGaming, 2003"

"The notion that immersion becomes pleasurable is not without its roots in the rhetoric of chemical drug use, and works to support a discursive matrix presenting violence, drugs and gameplay as interrelated or, indeed, undifferentiated. Certainly it is the case that a game’s form requires a participant player to engage with a narrative in an interactive way around a goal-oriented main character."

 

  1. How does an academic article differ from 6A) a traditional game review, and 6B) New Games Journalism?

It differs because this is not a game review. There are similiar elements that that place through out the article i read.  In come cases it seemed as if the writer was talking from a personal point of view, and then other cases where he was taking a professional point of view and expressing that.  I feel like an academic article in some cases is more credible because of its sources, but at the same time with traditional game reviews and new games journalism, the language and research done is very credible.  I feel like the question has so many answers, either being the right one. 

 

Class Presentation

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Violent video games can increase aggression with their players.  I believe this statement holds true, but I personally feel that its not just violent games that cause aggression.  I honestly say that the actions I took while playing a ‘violent game never influenced me to go commit violent acts.  For me it was playing football games, or ‘sporting’ games, better yet E-Rated Games. 

In my experience with the gaming world, I have seen more aggression while playing games like Madden Football, NCAA Football, NBA Jam, and these are not violent games.  There are no guns, murder, stealing, sex, going on at all.  What you have to look at is the word violence.  Violence is not limited to guns and murder, which society would consider the ‘norm’.  If you look at Sonic the HedgeHog, sonic uses his body to defeat the enemy and is reward with gold coins. Compare this, shooting a zombie in the head for the 100th time, or knocking the helmet off of a receiver, causing him to leave the game.  What is more violent? I have played the violent games such as DOOM and Grand Theft Auto and their nothing short of violence in games such as Medal of Honor or Splinter Cell.  All games with the same point to defeat the enemy to reach you next goal or next objective.  I feel that people are trying to find answers or solutions to the violence that is happening in today’s society.  It seems as if it’s a fall back for society, that it provides a solution to an ever-growing violent society.

In the early 90s, action games like Dune and first-person shooters like Wolfenstein emerged. More recent games like Quake, Half-Life, and System Shock are so graphically real and mentally absorbing in their storylines, you don’t just play the games anymore, and you are part of the game. These game worlds have very few laws, if any at all, governing what goes on inside them. It is a dynamic that is limited only by the imagination of the designer and the desire of the game player to be absorbed in the fantasy. No holographic policeman exists in the virtual world to enforce what is right. Gamers are left to do what is right in their own eyes. This freedom to influence our children has many parents concerned.

Two studies published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology in 2000 clearly demonstrate that violent video games do negatively affect the behavior of those who play them. One study demonstrated that graphically violent video games produce an immediate increase in aggressive thoughts and behavior. The other study found that violent game play not only increased aggressive behavior, but also produced a long-term, real life impact on the behavior and relationships of the players.

I feel that violent video games, game consul or PC, can affect the player in the following ways.  The first way is with the player identifying with the aggressor. In “first-person” video games, the player assumes the identity of the shooter and sees the world through the character’s eyes. In effect, the game puts the weapon in the hands of the player to heighten the game’s impact as the player kills the enemy. This study found that players became emotionally involved with their character and “enjoyed” killing the bad guys.  It is one thing to watch the movie Terminator and stand witness to his destruction, but it’s another thing to actually be the terminator and engage in the same actions as him.  Now As a result of identifying with the aggressor the player develops positive attitudes toward the use of violence, a player gets reward with the destructions of the enemies.  A personal experience I had with this was with the game Mortal Combat.  Every time I killed my opponent, I moved up to the next level and so forth continued to the “top of the mountain” to face the grand master.  So I would get excited when I would finish my opponent.  Players also develop expectations that others will behave aggressively, a player can assume that others have similar attitudes of aggression and there for a game player can come to the belief that violent solutions are effective and appropriate for solving problems in life.  Some people are easily influenced and others are not.  In my case I could tell the difference between a game and reality.  But not everyone can.  There are game players who divulge in some of these games and are so consumed by a game that they start to relate them to reality.  "Violent video games provide a forum for learning and practicing aggressive solutions to conflict situations," said Dr. Anderson. "In the short run, playing a violent video game appears to affect aggression by priming aggressive thoughts. Longer-term effects are likely to be longer lasting as well, as the player learns and practices new aggression-related scripts that can become more and more accessible for use when real-life conflict situations arise."

 Secondly, the game player actively participates in the violence. Numerous studies have found that playing violent video games is a way to rehearse violent behaviors and makes it easier to bring that behavior into real life. If you practice shooting basketballs thousands of times, you get better at scoring. If you practice killing thousands of times, you get better at that as well.  I give you the example of the Columbine shooters. Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold had been playing “first-person shooters” for more than a year before that fateful day. When the time came to “play the game” in the real world, they were ready. So as a result of actively participating in the violence, these game players develop a total disregard for societal norms, property rights, and even the general value of other lives.  The player see the world as a violent, unsafe place where everyone is out to get you, society is trying to destroy the very life you live and breath. The player learns that aggressive actions against others, such as fighting and shooting, may be appropriate, even necessary in certain cases. Violent video games have an addictive nature, and for an aggressive performance, players receive constant and immediate reinforcement in the form of visual and auditory stimulation during a kill. With special effects such as exploding body parts, blood, gore, and general mayhem it provides an excellent environment for learning aggression. "One study reveals that young men who are habitually aggressive may be especially vulnerable to the aggression-enhancing effects of repeated exposure to violent games," said psychologists Craig A. Anderson, Ph.D., and Karen E. Dill, Ph.D. "The other study reveals that even a brief exposure to violent video games can temporarily increase aggressive behavior in all types of participants."

So as a result of the addictive nature of violent video games I feel that excessive exposure contributes to aggressive personality traits in the player, and further playing can make an already aggressive person even more aggressive. The player becomes more aggressive, changes his outlook on life and socializing, and tends to socialize with others who demonstrate similar attitudes of aggression and finally the player’s socialization with teachers, parents, and non-aggressive peers are likely to degenerate. The more realistic the games are, the stronger the negative impact.

 

Class Presentation

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Violent video games can increase aggression with their players.  I believe this statement holds true, but I personally feel that its not just violent games that cause aggression.  I honestly say that the actions I took while playing a ‘violent game never influenced me to go commit violent acts.  For me it was playing football games, or ‘sporting’ games, better yet E-Rated Games. 

In my experience with the gaming world, I have seen more aggression while playing games like Madden Football, NCAA Football, NBA Jam, and these are not violent games.  There are no guns, murder, stealing, sex, going on at all.  What you have to look at is the word violence.  Violence is not limited to guns and murder, which society would consider the ‘norm’.  If you look at Sonic the HedgeHog, sonic uses his body to defeat the enemy and is reward with gold coins. Compare this, shooting a zombie in the head for the 100th time, or knocking the helmet off of a receiver, causing him to leave the game.  What is more violent? I have played the violent games such as DOOM and Grand Theft Auto and their nothing short of violence in games such as Medal of Honor or Splinter Cell.  All games with the same point to defeat the enemy to reach you next goal or next objective.  I feel that people are trying to find answers or solutions to the violence that is happening in today’s society.  It seems as if it’s a fall back for society, that it provides a solution to an ever-growing violent society.

In the early ‘90s, action games like Dune and first-person shooters like Wolfenstein emerged. More recent games like Quake, Half-Life, and System Shock are so graphically real and mentally absorbing in their storylines, you don’t just play the games anymore, and you are part of the game. These game worlds have very few laws, if any at all, governing what goes on inside them. It is a dynamic that is limited only by the imagination of the designer and the desire of the game player to be absorbed in the fantasy. No holographic policeman exists in the virtual world to enforce what is right. Gamers are left to do what is right in their own eyes. This freedom to influence our children has many parents concerned.

Two studies published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology in 2000 clearly demonstrate that violent video games do negatively affect the behavior of those who play them. One study demonstrated that graphically violent video games produce an immediate increase in aggressive thoughts and behavior. The other study found that violent game play not only increased aggressive behavior, but also produced a long-term, real life impact on the behavior and relationships of the players.

I feel that violent video games, game consul or PC, can affect the player in the following ways.  The first way is with the player identifying with the aggressor. In “first-person” video games, the player assumes the identity of the shooter and sees the world through the character’s eyes. In effect, the game puts the weapon in the hands of the player to heighten the game’s impact as the player kills the enemy. This study found that players became emotionally involved with their character and “enjoyed” killing the bad guys.  It is one thing to watch the movie Terminator and stand witness to his destruction, but it’s another thing to actually be the terminator and engage in the same actions as him.  Now As a result of identifying with the aggressor the player develops positive attitudes toward the use of violence, a player gets reward with the destructions of the enemies.  A personal experience I had with this was with the game Mortal Combat.  Every time I killed my opponent, I moved up to the next level and so forth continued to the “top of the mountain” to face the grand master.  So I would get excited when I would finish my opponent.  Players also develop expectations that others will behave aggressively, a player can assume that others have similar attitudes of aggression and there for a game player can come to the belief that violent solutions are effective and appropriate for solving problems in life.  Some people are easily influenced and others are not.  In my case I could tell the difference between a game and reality.  But not everyone can.  There are game players who divulge in some of these games and are so consumed by a game that they start to relate them to reality.  "Violent video games provide a forum for learning and practicing aggressive solutions to conflict situations," said Dr. Anderson. "In the short run, playing a violent video game appears to affect aggression by priming aggressive thoughts. Longer-term effects are likely to be longer lasting as well, as the player learns and practices new aggression-related scripts that can become more and more accessible for use when real-life conflict situations arise."(cite)

 Secondly, the game player actively participates in the violence. Numerous studies have found that playing violent video games is a way to rehearse violent behaviors and makes it easier to bring that behavior into real life. If you practice shooting basketballs thousands of times, you get better at scoring. If you practice killing thousands of times, you get better at that as well.  I give you the example of the Columbine shooters. Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold had been playing “first-person shooters” for more than a year before that fateful day. When the time came to “play the game” in the real world, they were ready. So as a result of actively participating in the violence, these game players develop a total disregard for societal norms, property rights, and even the general value of other lives.  The player see the world as a violent, unsafe place where everyone is out to get you, society is trying to destroy the very life you live and breath. The player learns that aggressive actions against others, such as fighting and shooting, may be appropriate, even necessary in certain cases. Violent video games have an addictive nature, and for an aggressive performance, players receive constant and immediate reinforcement in the form of visual and auditory stimulation during a kill. With special effects such as exploding body parts, blood, gore, and general mayhem it provides an excellent environment for learning aggression. "One study reveals that young men who are habitually aggressive may be especially vulnerable to the aggression-enhancing effects of repeated exposure to violent games," said psychologists Craig A. Anderson, Ph.D., and Karen E. Dill, Ph.D. "The other study reveals that even a brief exposure to violent video games can temporarily increase aggressive behavior in all types of participants."(cite)

So as a result of the addictive nature of violent video games I feel that excessive exposure contributes to aggressive personality traits in the player, and further playing can make an already aggressive person even more aggressive. The player becomes more aggressive, changes his outlook on life and socializing, and tends to socialize with others who demonstrate similar attitudes of aggression and finally the player’s socialization with teachers, parents, and non-aggressive peers are likely to degenerate. The more realistic the games are, the stronger the negative impact.

 

Class Presentation

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Violent video games can increase aggression with their players.  I believe this statement holds true, but I personally feel that its not just violent games that cause aggression.  I honestly say that the actions I took while playing a ‘violent game never influenced me to go commit violent acts.  For me it was playing football games, or ‘sporting’ games, better yet E-Rated Games. 

In my experience with the gaming world, I have seen more aggression while playing games like Madden Football, NCAA Football, NBA Jam, and these are not violent games.  There are no guns, murder, stealing, sex, going on at all.  What you have to look at is the word violence.  Violence is not limited to guns and murder, which society would consider the ‘norm’.  If you look at Sonic the HedgeHog, sonic uses his body to defeat the enemy and is reward with gold coins. Compare this, shooting a zombie in the head for the 100th time, or knocking the helmet off of a receiver, causing him to leave the game.  What is more violent? I have played the violent games such as DOOM and Grand Theft Auto and their nothing short of violence in games such as Medal of Honor or Splinter Cell.  All games with the same point to defeat the enemy to reach you next goal or next objective.  I feel that people are trying to find answers or solutions to the violence that is happening in today’s society.  It seems as if it’s a fall back for society, that it provides a solution to an ever-growing violent society.

In the early ‘90s, action games like Dune and first-person shooters like Wolfenstein emerged. More recent games like Quake, Half-Life, and System Shock are so graphically real and mentally absorbing in their storylines, you don’t just play the games anymore, and you are part of the game. These game worlds have very few laws, if any at all, governing what goes on inside them. It is a dynamic that is limited only by the imagination of the designer and the desire of the game player to be absorbed in the fantasy. No holographic policeman exists in the virtual world to enforce what is right. Gamers are left to do what is right in their own eyes. This freedom to influence our children has many parents concerned.

Two studies published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology in 2000 clearly demonstrate that violent video games do negatively affect the behavior of those who play them. One study demonstrated that graphically violent video games produce an immediate increase in aggressive thoughts and behavior. The other study found that violent game play not only increased aggressive behavior, but also produced a long-term, real life impact on the behavior and relationships of the players.

I feel that violent video games, game consul or PC, can affect the player in the following ways.  The first way is with the player identifying with the aggressor. In “first-person” video games, the player assumes the identity of the shooter and sees the world through the character’s eyes. In effect, the game puts the weapon in the hands of the player to heighten the game’s impact as the player kills the enemy. This study found that players became emotionally involved with their character and “enjoyed” killing the bad guys.  It is one thing to watch the movie Terminator and stand witness to his destruction, but it’s another thing to actually be the terminator and engage in the same actions as him.  Now As a result of identifying with the aggressor the player develops positive attitudes toward the use of violence, a player gets reward with the destructions of the enemies.  A personal experience I had with this was with the game Mortal Combat.  Every time I killed my opponent, I moved up to the next level and so forth continued to the “top of the mountain” to face the grand master.  So I would get excited when I would finish my opponent.  Players also develop expectations that others will behave aggressively, a player can assume that others have similar attitudes of aggression and there for a game player can come to the belief that violent solutions are effective and appropriate for solving problems in life.  Some people are easily influenced and others are not.  In my case I could tell the difference between a game and reality.  But not everyone can.  There are game players who divulge in some of these games and are so consumed by a game that they start to relate them to reality.  "Violent video games provide a forum for learning and practicing aggressive solutions to conflict situations," said Dr. Anderson. "In the short run, playing a violent video game appears to affect aggression by priming aggressive thoughts. Longer-term effects are likely to be longer lasting as well, as the player learns and practices new aggression-related scripts that can become more and more accessible for use when real-life conflict situations arise."(cite)

 Secondly, the game player actively participates in the violence. Numerous studies have found that playing violent video games is a way to rehearse violent behaviors and makes it easier to bring that behavior into real life. If you practice shooting basketballs thousands of times, you get better at scoring. If you practice killing thousands of times, you get better at that as well.  I give you the example of the Columbine shooters. Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold had been playing “first-person shooters” for more than a year before that fateful day. When the time came to “play the game” in the real world, they were ready. So as a result of actively participating in the violence, these game players develop a total disregard for societal norms, property rights, and even the general value of other lives.  The player see the world as a violent, unsafe place where everyone is out to get you, society is trying to destroy the very life you live and breath. The player learns that aggressive actions against others, such as fighting and shooting, may be appropriate, even necessary in certain cases. Violent video games have an addictive nature, and for an aggressive performance, players receive constant and immediate reinforcement in the form of visual and auditory stimulation during a kill. With special effects such as exploding body parts, blood, gore, and general mayhem it provides an excellent environment for learning aggression. "One study reveals that young men who are habitually aggressive may be especially vulnerable to the aggression-enhancing effects of repeated exposure to violent games," said psychologists Craig A. Anderson, Ph.D., and Karen E. Dill, Ph.D. "The other study reveals that even a brief exposure to violent video games can temporarily increase aggressive behavior in all types of participants."(cite)

So as a result of the addictive nature of violent video games I feel that excessive exposure contributes to aggressive personality traits in the player, and further playing can make an already aggressive person even more aggressive. The player becomes more aggressive, changes his outlook on life and socializing, and tends to socialize with others who demonstrate similar attitudes of aggression and finally the player’s socialization with teachers, parents, and non-aggressive peers are likely to degenerate. The more realistic the games are, the stronger the negative impact.

 

Game Analysis 2: Army Men Series

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The series was based on a war between four main sets of plastic army men: the Green, the Tan, the Blue, and the Grey.  I played and successfully completed each game, down to the last final mission, successfully beating each game, defeating the enemy.  I was so taken away by this game, and for no apparent reason.  There was no blood, the graphics were good for the time, it had your war game elements within the mission, and for some reason I was so consumed with it.  I started with Army Men: Air Attack in 1999 on Playstation, and continued until 2001 Portal Runner.  I think the unique design of the games missions draws the player in.  The graphics are not the most visually stimulating, but the concept of the game itself identifies with the player.  Each game comes with an overall objective, in Army Men: Sarge’s Hero’s , “Vikki has been kidnapped by General Plastro of the evil Tan army. To get her back, you will need to face countless Tan soldiers, tanks, helicopters and even robots. Stranger enemies await you as well: giant insects from another world. The Tan Army has captured portals to a strange world of giants. When you travel to these worlds, you will find yourself engaged in combat through giant kitchens, bathrooms, and an enormous sandcastle.”(Game Revolution)  ),  this version breaks new ground in its search for interactive environments. You take the fight into the home as your miniaturized soldiers shoot it out on the shores of the bathroom, in bedroom trenches, and on kitchen battlefields. In each game that came out you would get something different, graphic, weapons, missions, would all be different.  I was always excited about the new version.  It was a step in a different direction for me as far as playing video games goes.  It was different from the usual blood, guts, monsters, things of that nature.  I enjoyed destroying plastic army men.  Just like when I was a child, expect for real guns and real action.  Some how I probably fulfilled some childhood dream of actually playing with my army men.  Who doesn’t want to see their toys come to life?  It’s a great game that I spent many countless hours on with no regret. 

 

The Myth of the Ergodic Videogame

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"the pleasures of videogames are frequently enjoyed by those that commonsense might encourage us to consider as non-players - "onlookers" that exert no direct control via the game controls. In this article, I want to suggest that videogame players need not actually touch a joypad, mouse or keyboard and that our definition needs to accommodate these non-controlling roles. The pleasure of videogame play does not simply flow through the lead of a joystick."

After reading through the article trying to understand all that I read, i went back to this particular statement, becaue it was one of the few to make sense to me.  I agree with what Newman is saying, games today don't have to be played to enjoy the gaming experience.  When Newman uses Starfox and a reference to this, I could remember playing that game when i was younger and always getting somewhat impatient with all the stories involved in the game.  At first I didn't mind them but, everytime I played the game and having to wait for the intro to finish to play, it was irritating.  But aside from that i think players develope relationships with these characters on games and do start to view a game through the eyes of that character.  When players develope these kind of relationships through their character, one can feel a sense of relivance within the game.  In Madden, you can simulate a game, this is where you watch two teams play without any controller action by the user, I have done this before with friends.  I am playin, experiencing the game without using the controls, therefore to my proving that games can be played without control, joystick interaction

Portfolio 1

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Since the start of this class I have gained a new respect for gaming Its History Alright.  I think that I have done my best in understanding this new outlook.  Dr. Jerz us really looking into what gaming is and what its about.  There a lot of critical thinking, and being a football player, critical thinking is not my strong points, haha just kidding.  Dr. Jerz requires us as a class to expand our thinking outside our usual opinion while at the same time expressing our normal perspective.

Here are the links to all of my posted blogs ( includes reflections, game analysis, RRRR):

I've also interacted with the class through comments on other classmates bloggs.

There will be more comments I have just been having trouble with commenting, I thought there were more.

 

SO.................

Overall I feel like I have doing my best to keep up with the class assignments.  This subject is very new to me, but is opening up my eyes to a different light of gaming.  I have seen a new light to video gaming and where its come from and where it's going.  I have given much thought to what I have covered so far in this course, and can only hope to grasp the subject more in the future.

 

Gender and Games- Lara Croft

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A. Feminist "Tomb Raider is promoting pornography. Looking at Croft on screen is like looking at a pornographic magazine. Gamers that find her sexually desirable exploit her computerized image with the unauthorized “NudeRaider” patch that can be applied to the computer version of the game to play nude as Lara."

B. Anti-Feminist "She is breaking the stereotypes for women in games and opening opportunities for women in the genre as a whole. "

After reading the presentation by a former student on the issue of Lara Croft, I was sort of taken in.  I personally never looked at the game that deeply.  But I found it interesting on the points that were made and can see how the game could be viewed as degrading to women, look to quote A.  Theres a valid point in there, but at the same time, if Lara Croft was a overweight fully clothed character would she be more appealing?  When a game is desgined, the creator wants it to appeal to consumers, and having a sexy, kick ass women does that.  Wasn't Lara Croft the first story game to have a female as the main character? Or one of the first.  To me lara Croft the game(s) and movie show a woman in power dominating men and looking good at the same time.  Isn't that what feminist want, a women kicking a mans ass?  I agree with quote B. the game did wonders for the industry.  Todays world seems so modest and conservative its sad.  It wasnt the first time sexiness was used to promote something, i think that it is necessary to modify certaing things to appeal to a wide range of audience.

Narratology and Ludology: Some Conversation

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Unlike Juul I feel games are stories and do involve a certain vocabulary tool.  With Juul feeling this way towards game and then reading, “Juul's central claim -- that games are unique creations and they require a brand new vocabulary so that we can talk to each other about what matters to designers, players, and critics of games.”  Isn’t that in a sense storytelling?  Story telling is never the same for each ‘story’ told, there’s always a unique way of showing/telling it, right?

Traditional Game Review-Madden Football '08

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 Madden NFL Football 2008 is the latest version of the classic football game series. The game consists of updated NFL rosters and coaches. The game has most of the same features as past years, but it also has some newer features as well. One of the biggest and most impacting features is the new "weapons" system. This system is basically designed to provide differentiation between specific types of star players. Due to specific icons for each type of player, you can now see the difference between a possession receiver and a big-play receiver, an accurate quarterback and a strong-armed quarterback, a shutdown cornerback and a press-coverage cornerback, and so forth. The changes to the defensive side of the ball aren't as drastic. You can now focus coverage on a specific receiver. Also tacking has some new modifications. A player can tackle high as well as tackling low. Other wise the changes are minor. With the graphics end of the game, there are some added additions like gang tackling, but nothing drastically different.
The only challenges that I see are with the new audible controls of difference and new control buttons. There is nothing that can't easily be overcome by just playing the game for a little while. My overall rating for the game is good. Madden is for the football fan and is aimed to creating a more realistic approach to football on video consoles. No drastic changes have been made besides for a few added details. I do think the none football fan can understand and enjoy the game for what its worth.

Shanahan's "Bow N***er"

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 Shanahan's "Bow N***er" To start off with the differences between the two types of reviews,
the page itself was the first major difference between the two. When connected to the GameSpot review page, I felt like I was at a professional page with credibility. The review on by Amer Ajami was very professional and gave a more non-opinion review of the game. He gave insight to the game but left his opinion open, not judgmental. In Amer Ajami's GameSpot review of Jedi Outcast he starts the review with, "A good first impression is always important. Surprisingly, LucasArts and Raven Software's Jedi Knight II: Jedi Outcast doesn't really give one. Instead, the third game in the long-running Star Wars-themed shooter series initially gives the impression that it's a flashy but basic action game that isn't as ambitious as its highly acclaimed predecessor, Jedi Knight. However, Jedi Outcast soon transforms from a typical first-person shooter to an exceptional Star Wars action game that contains some of the best combat sequences since Half- Life, the most distinctive control mechanics since Max Payne, and the most involving plot in a Star Wars game since Jedi Knight." So after reading the introduction, the feel for the rest of the review was going to be professional, formal, and non-opinionated. At least that's what felt. Also, I knew what I was going to be reading.
Now on the other hand, what stuck me when reading Ian Shanahan's review, I wasn't sure what I was about to read. I was actually kind of offended by the terminology used. I was curious on how the title of the review related to gaming. But upon reading more into the review I started to become more interested in what he was saying. It was like he was telling a story, and he brought you into that story. Shanahan states, "This makes your game 'life' actually worth something and it makes it worth fighting for." That statement can relate to anyone, and so readers can connect with what Ian Shanahan is saying, he makes the review seem personal. "They'll show each other a degree of respect that is just absent from most other multiplayer games and they express that respect in a variety of ways, from the odd little emergent bow to ad hoc lessons from complete strangers to clans adopting the padawan/master relationship outlined in the films. Most of the players are good guys." This is another example of how the review seems personal, sucking you in, so that you want to keep reading and wanting to know more.
As far as game review goes, I felt that Amer Ajami's review want more informative, less exciting, but gives you a plentiful amount of information about the game and what to expect. With Ian Shanahan's review was 'hidden' through out his personal experience of the game. He only gave a point of view from the multiplayer perspective of the game. His review was intriguing and catchy, but I'm not buying just a multiplayer game, there is much more to it which he didn't review. I feel that although less exciting, the traditional way to review games may be more informative on what the game is. The new games journalism seems to be more personal connection, making a person feel connected with the game. But it could be less informative, at least after reading and comparing the two readings.

Somewhere Nearby is colossal Cave

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It is very interesting to see that the cave in this game resembles the actual cave that it was intended to model.  Mapping out an area on a game seems to have been around for a while now, the having a designated area on a game and keeping it modern is very cool.  I was not to familiar with the coding, nor with to many of the texted games, but when I finally figured it out somewhat, there was a bit a an accomplished feeling.  As I read though the articles, with visuals (finally!) it helped show what I was getting into. 

Test

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Mr. Ebert

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To give a quick opinion on what i feel about Mr. Eberts comment about video games, I would have to stronrly disagree.  Video gaming is art, or else what do you call all the digital effects, imaging, designing, everything that goes into a game.  Do you think that some people my want to have a choice of what their viewing or how their interacting? I do, I mean come on.  I don't feel his opinion is open minded at all. I think it is coming from a old school mentality, which i think he is stuck in.( disagree with some of the movie reviews).  Video gaming is a form of art form, just different from film and literature.  But at the same time, there are many books that are made into movies, which in turn are then made into video games? Huh? 

"To my knowledge, no one in or out of the field has ever been able to cite a game worthy of comparison with the great dramatists, poets, filmmakers, novelists and composers." Ebert quotes.  My response to this is no yet.  With the new forms of gaming, like NGJ, there are possibilities that games will be considered with some of the great poets, filmmakers, etc. Just hasn't happened yet.

Interactive Fiction

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Zach Talkovic

EL250

 

After reviewing and reading about what interactive fiction is, how it was created, how its played, where its gone, I have come to the conclusion that its not for me.  The way that games were created is interesting and how gaming has come so far is interesting to see.  But other than that my feelings towards it are 'bluhg'.  I am a visual person, so seeing is very important in my game play.  The text play games don't keep my interest at all.  If I'm not seeing it, I don't seem to care, it just doesn't keep me wanting to know more.  I think that a important element to gaming now, and probably a big reason text isn't as big as it was.  With all the new effects, visual game play it would seem hard to compete, unless you are a classic gamer.  Text gaming was the start of something, and has evolved into more adavanced gaming.  Just like with anything, when something is first presented, and its the first of its kind, everyone is going to be amazed, but then later on another company is going to make a better version that has better graphics, better controls, better everything.  That is what makes the world a interesting place.  Relating that to game culture, look and the game reviewing and how that has changed.  A new for of reviewing has been formed and could eventually take the place of classic reviewing.  It is really hard for me to really get into this text gaming, interactive fiction because in now way does it appeal to me, especially being that there is no visual inticement at all.  I have given it an honest try, but just can't get the jist of it.  It is interesting to see where gameing got its roots from, but as far as playing these classic text games, it's just not working for me.

Game Analysis 1

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Game 1: September 12

When I first glanced at the opening page, I though that the game might be some sort of interactive game with serious game play.  When I read down on the screen I realize that the game had already began, as stated.  As well as the opening screen stated war on terror.  These are key terms that stood out to me.  As the game started I realized that the setting was in the Middle East, in a small Middle Eastern town.  Then I noticed the target on the screen.  Being impatient as I am I just clicked and saw the missile fly in and explode on the targeted area.  I thought to myself ok, this game is apparently in response to the attack on September 11.  I also noticed that you can’t avoid the innocent bystanders when targeting the ‘enemies’.  The game was to kill all with no remorse for what or who was destroyed.  I personally did not enjoy the game.  After 15 seconds of playing it became very repetitive and old.  The topic of the game is some what ‘sick’ but at the same time might help someone cope with the war on terrorism, some how.

 

Game 2: Madrid

Again at the introduction screen I was under the impression that the game was going to be a more innovative, story like game.  And again I was fooled.  Lighting candles, and keeping the lit.  That was the core of the game.  As much as I tried to keep the candles lit, and I was moving pretty fast, I could not fill up the bar in the lower screen.  I wasn’t sure what the point of the game was, but when I thought about it, there seemed to be an underlying message and point to the game.  No matter how much you support something, or love and represent something, its almost impossible to get everyone to feel the same way.  All people are not alike and keeping the ‘lights’ lit or keeping happiness and harmony, it virtually impossible.

 

Jerz and Adams

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Going through this I realized that I was out of my league when it came to video gaming.  So much has been done and created that its a little intimidating.  For one, just having the creator of 'video games' his imortant because Adams is such a respected figure, secondly interactive fiction is a huge part of gaming today.

I never new much about the history of video games, better yet interactive fiction until this article.  I found out that Scott Adams was the inventor of first commercial computer game, also classic computers on using 16k instead of 1000k was new to me.  Its cool to see how something so bacis and simple can entertain young people today.  Especially with the technology were used to, but Adams did so with his classic game.  Haveing a family friendly game make good with having family time.  Its just another way to connect with your family/friends by trying a something new.

 

Its History Alright

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After reading through Jerz's HIstory of Video games I felt like I learned something new and interesting.  Back in teh fall of 07 in my Internet Communication Class, I did a paper on the history of the Internet.  When reading through Jerz's document i felt familiar with some of the content that was being discussed.  But when i watched the games that he talked about Tennis for Two, Spacewar!, and Maze War, I was in amazement.  When I saw the computers they were using, i realized how far we have come.  Technology has grown drastically, and reading the document makes you realize that. 

Maze War was obviously a new technology.  You could tell that gaming was just beginning.  It was very simple in its concept.  Not to appealing to me at all.  But then agian if I was around at that time I would probable feel alot different.

Spacewar was just very bland.  You could tell the technology was getting betten in the fact that the game seemed more interactive.  There was more action involveld in the game.  Almost seemed like Asteroid

The last fame Tennis for Two was the most appealing.  Even though the game appeard to look like some ancient form of television, and the controls that went into the game were just horriific, the point was simple.  It showed that gaming was becomming more involved and technology was on the move.  Like anything it is nice to see where you come from, as a person, and as a community.  Our country's advances are rapidly changing and as from the start of it all, the possibilties are limitless.

Strongbadzone

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Out of the 4 games played, this one was my favorite.  The graphic weren't amazing, but the point was simple.  Reflect the object and hit the head.  Simple enough?  Im not sure why this game sparked an enterest more so than the other, but it did.  Who doesn't want to blow apart a villian's head.

The DungeonMan

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Out of all the games played, I could not figure out how to get past the secon part.  This game was not very interesting to me at all.  The graphics seemed to be better than the rest of the games, but the overall concept of typing in text to get further in the game is really not apealing to me at all.  I like the other games because they were more interactive and there was more to them than just typing.  Maybe I just got fustrated because I couldn't get past the 2nd part, so i just quit, but this game was not to apealing.

Sample Try

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Just trying to figure this blogging out

I'm Confused

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This is a lot of stuff to find and figure out.
Welcome to your Seton Hill University weblog.

The web address "http://blogs.setonhill.edu/FirstnameLastname" is where your most recent entries will appear. New entries will appear at the top of this page, and older entries will slide down the page and eventually move to an archive.

To create and edit entries on your site, go to blogs.setonhill.edu, and log in with your blog username and password. (You'll need to get that information from a blog administrator. Contact me, Dennis Jerz, for help.)

I have posted a welcome message on the New Media Journalism weblog, which has links to tutorials and troubleshooting guides.

Recent Comments

Derek Tickle on Portfolio 1: Hi Zach! I like how you tell u
Dennis G. Jerz on Portfolio 1: A very good opening paragraph.
Derek Tickle on The Myth of the Ergodic Videogame: Isn't this topic very interest
Ashley F on Mr. Ebert: Zach do you have any more thou
Dennis G. Jerz on Gender and Games- Lara Croft: Zach, check out Derek's respon
Admin on Mr. Ebert: I think you're is onto somethi
Ashley F on Mr. Ebert: "Video gaming is art, or else
Derek Tickle on Strongbadzone: Hi Zach! I found this one to b
Dennis G. Jerz on Sample Try: It worked -- good job.