Waiting for Godot

In Waiting for Godot I noticed this passage: I can’t really decide if I like or dislike the splay because I kind of had a hard time trying to understand everything that was going on because I had to constantly reread certain parts to figure out what exactly was going on. At  one point of the play I thought that Vladimir and Estragon were lovers and then I just figured that maybe they were just really good friends, who’ve been together since they were children. When they encounter Pozzo and Lucky, I was unsure of what exactly Lucky because there was only action and no dialogue. The entire time I was thinking that he was an actual pig, then I was like oh well he’s a horse, but then I finally reached the part where he spoke and I was like he must be a talking animal or something. I would have never thought that he was a real person until I engaged more in the reading and that was more so because of the description he was giving and the way he was being talked about by Pozzo. After finding out he was a real person I was kind of shocked, but at the same time I was intrigued by his monologue because it gave a lot of insight on his character as a whole. The part about the boots was also confusing to me because in the beginning Estragon wasn’t able to fit the boots, then all of a sudden in act two the boots were two big for him and that threw me off a little. Although I kind of wish I was able to obtain a better interpretation of the play on my own, instead of being so confused the entire time and I wish I found it more engaging being as though I had just read Medea. In the end I guess that’s what plays are all about, figuring out the different interpretations  and making connections, but I don’t understand how it was a tragicomedy.

Source: Waiting for Godot

Posted by danisharogers   @   3 April 2017

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2 Comments

Comments
Apr 5, 2017
12:42 am
#1 rebeccascassellati :

About it being a “tragicomedy,” my guess would be it’s a comedy because a bunch of goofy stuff happens in it, and it’s a tragedy because it’s sad that they never meet Godot. Just a guess.

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