NO one is just one

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"No theory or method, in any case, will have merely one strategic use. They can be mobilized in a variety of different strategies for a variety of ends. But not all methods will be equally amenable to particular ends. It is a matter of finding out, not of assuming from the start that a single method or theory will do." -Eagleton p. 184

Within Eagleton's chapter Conclusion: Political Criticism, I felt that this quote was very interesting. I felt that Eagleton made a very good point when he said that the school of criticism's are not just used in one way.

From the beginning of the semester I felt that this aspect of literary criticism is very important. For instance, in Miko's essay "Tempest", he uses multiple schools of theory to examine his theory, such as author intent and reader-response even though it may not have been his mission to analyze those aspects of the play.

If I have learned and understood anything within this class it is that multiple schools may overlap and work towards a stronger argument.

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Bethany, yes, I definitely learned that too. I also think another part of Eagleton’s quote which is interesting, “But not all methods will be equally amenable to particular ends” (184). In other words, certain schools work better on certain texts. I certainly think that this is true as well.

I agree, Bethany. Eagleton said that it is impossible to define literary theory because it uses a variety of disciplines. I think that is what makes literary theory applicable today. If it did not include other fields of study like history and psychology then it would have expired.

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This page contains a single entry by published on April 14, 2009 12:52 PM.

Why Can't We Be Friends in Lit Crit? was the previous entry in this blog.

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