Violence is the Answer?

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"Voilence is one of the most personal and even intimate acts between human beings, but it can also be cultural, societal in its implications.  It can be symbolic, thematic, biblical, Shakespearean, Romantic,  allegorical, transcendent.  Violence in real life just is." (Foster, 88).

Right now I am asking myself how in the world can violence be romantic and how can it be one of the most intimate acts between human beings?

Violence to me is bad in every way. There is nothing good about it and nothing good comes out of it.

It says its symbolic.  "Here's the problem with symbols: people expect them to mean something.  Not just any something, but one something in particular." (Foster, 97). 

But how is violence symbolic? To me it symbolizes bad behavior and rash judgements about how to handle a problem.   

Bringing violence into a lot of books, movies, and television shows pushes people to do more violence I believe.  But in Foster it says that in literature violence usually means something else so does anyone have any idea what violence means in literature?

3 Comments

Rachael Sarver said:

Violence is definitely the opposite of intimacy. You punch someone in the face because aggression is one of the most primitive human instincts. I think violence is put into literature to attract readers, to make it exciting, and to give it that "whoa" experience. There really is not symbolic, intimate meaning to violence except "you pissed me off and you will pay for it in the form of pain."

christian said:

violence is never the answer, words are always the unique way to solve the problems.

Alicia Campbell said:

In trying to make sense of what Foster is trying to communicate, I immediately thought of domestic violence. I agree that violence is always bad, but I think it could be symbolic. For instance, a domestic dispute could be symbolic of societal views of men as the dominant sex, women as the weaker, and the tension or struggle that exists from the latter attempting to overcome the former. I also looked up alternate meanings of intimacy, and I found some definitions that made me consider violence as intimate, too. for example, one definition simply suggested intimate to mean inmost or deep within. Perhaps a character in a literary work has some internal struggle deep within himself, or some overwhelming prejudice in his self-conscious, that is expressed as violence.

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