Portfolio 1

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Coverage: Here are all the blog entries I have posted.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/08/roberts_ch_2.html

The above entry was about the second chapter in our textbook, Writing About Literature. It discusses the close-reading process and how useful it will be for the rest of my collegiate career and how I will have to change my own personal method of reading.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/trifles_by_susan_glaspell_earl.html

The above entry was originally posted as a response to chapter 3, but I also used it in a later blog in which I was also supposed to respond to Trifles. This entry discusses the overtones of feminism that Susan Glaspell worked into her one-act play.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/adolescence_is_rough.html

This entry was in response to three poems that Billy Collins wrote. I dicussed how the poem On Turning Ten raises a good point that adults often overlook how certain childhood experiences can be just as tramatic and weighty as the issues that adults have to deal with. 

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/see_wordiness_isnt_so_bad.html

This blog was in response to An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge. In it, I discuss how the blatant wordiness that the author employs is very effective in creating an eery mood and placing the reader right in the story with the doomed main character. 

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/chapter_4_digging_deeper.html

This entry is in response to chapter 4 and conveys how excited I was to read about a subject with which I was not all that familiar.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/the_seasons_of_life.html

This entry is in response to Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 and it discusses the prevelance of the theme of the seasons of life in this and other of Shakespeare's work.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/a_brief_shining_moment_of_unfa.html

This blog discusses my dismay that chapter 5, after the informative chapter 4, was more review of a subject with which we, as English majors, are all-too familiar.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/for_shame.html

This entry was in response to the three Sylvia Plath poems we had to read. I wrote about Daddy and how reading that poem and the commentary the editor made in its regard spurred me to research into Plath's personal life and that, in turn, actually became one of my papers that I am going to write for this course.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/whos_the_real_fool.html

This entry was in response to Mark Twain/Samuel Clemens' short story, Luck. This entry discusses the sentiments that I shared in class about how the real fool in the story is actually the wise old Reverend who has harbored envy and bitterness toward his clumsy former student.

Depth: These are the entries for which I did outside research or developed my thoughts and ideas more fully. 

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/trifles_by_susan_glaspell_earl.html

The above entry was originally posted as a response to chapter 3, but I also used it in a later blog in which I was also supposed to respond to Trifles. This entry discusses the overtones of feminism that Susan Glaspell worked into her one-act play. I took a long time to create this entry and really thought that I made a good point. I was disappointed that more of my classmates did not read and respond to it...

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/the_seasons_of_life.html

This entry is in response to Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 and it discusses the prevelance of the theme of the seasons of life in this and other of Shakespeare's work. I was also disappointed to see that not many people responded to this blog because I made a valid point and can easily back it up as I have read a lot of Shakespeare in the AP English courses I took in high school...

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/for_shame.html

This entry was in response to the three Sylvia Plath poems we had to read. I wrote about Daddy and how reading that poem and the commentary the editor made in its regard spurred me to research into Plath's personal life and that, in turn, actually became one of my papers that I am going to write for this course. This blog is somewhat in depth, but the paper that has spawned from it is much more impressive...

Interaction: Here are some examples of "creative differences" between my classmates and I:

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JosieRush/2009/09/lying_eyes.html

This is a link to Josie Rush's blog in which we have a discussion on points of view. I respectfully pointed out how some of the points of view that she looked down upon in her entry can actually be fine if employed correctly and the discussion ended in her saying, "Your comment made me realize that it's really hard to choose a favorite pov. You kept selling me on all of them. I'm gonna have to rethink my opening line."

Discussions: Here are some links to blogs in which my peers and I have had interesting discussions:

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/trifles_by_susan_glaspell_earl.html

While brief, the discussion on this blog brought up some points that I had not even discussed in my entry... also, Dr. Jerz called me out for not actually blogging about the chapter and instead writing about one of the stories in that chapter.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JosieRush/2009/09/it_makes_my_love_more_strong_t.html

It has worked out that Josie Rush is involved in more of my online disussions that I thought. Here is a link to one of her blogs in which we slightly disagree on the meaning of Shakespeare's Sonnet 73,

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JosieRush/2009/09/lying_eyes.html

This is a link to Josie Rush's blog in which we have a discussion on points of view. I respectfully pointed out how some of the points of view that she looked down upon in her entry can actually be fine if employed correctly and the discussion ended in her saying, "Your comment made me realize that it's really hard to choose a favorite pov. You kept selling me on all of them. I'm gonna have to rethink my opening line.".

Timeliness: Here are the entries that I submitted on time:

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/08/roberts_ch_2.html

The above entry was about the second chapter in our textbook, Writing About Literature. It discusses the close-reading process and how useful it will be for the rest of my collegiate career and how I will have to change my own personal method of reading.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/trifles_by_susan_glaspell_earl.html

The above entry was originally posted as a response to chapter 3, but I also used it in a later blog in which I was also supposed to respond to Trifles. This entry discusses the overtones of feminism that Susan Glaspell worked into her one-act play.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/adolescence_is_rough.html

This entry was in response to three poems that Billy Collins wrote. I dicussed how the poem On Turning Ten raises a good point that adults often overlook how certain childhood experiences can be just as tramatic and weighty as the issues that adults have to deal with. 

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/see_wordiness_isnt_so_bad.html

This blog was in response to An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge. In it, I discuss how the blatant wordiness that the author employs is very effective in creating an eery mood and placing the reader right in the story with the doomed main character. 

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/chapter_4_digging_deeper.html

This entry is in response to chapter 4 and conveys how excited I was to read about a subject with which I was not all that familiar.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/the_seasons_of_life.html

This entry is in response to Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 and it discusses the prevelance of the theme of the seasons of life in this and other of Shakespeare's work.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/a_brief_shining_moment_of_unfa.html

This blog discusses my dismay that chapter 5, after the informative chapter 4, was more review of a subject with which we, as English majors, are all-too familiar.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/for_shame.html

This entry was in response to the three Sylvia Plath poems we had to read. I wrote about Daddy and how reading that poem and the commentary the editor made in its regard spurred me to research into Plath's personal life and that, in turn, actually became one of my papers that I am going to write for this course.

Xenoblogging:

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JosieRush/2009/09/lying_eyes.html

This is a link to Josie Rush's blog in which we have a discussion on points of view. I respectfully pointed out how some of the points of view that she looked down upon in her entry can actually be fine if employed correctly and the discussion ended in her saying, "Your comment made me realize that it's really hard to choose a favorite pov. You kept selling me on all of them. I'm gonna have to rethink my opening line.".Whether or not she went back and edited her blog, I do not know... however, I got her to consider it.

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/MelissaSchwenk/2009/09/a_devilish_illusion.html

This is a link to one of Melissa Schwenk's blogs on which I was the first to comment. I talked about how unique her point of view on the story was and so did all of the subsequent posts, whether they agreed with me or not...

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/for_shame.html

This entry was special to me because Jessica Orlowski and I sat out on one of the Admin. building porches one night just reading and discussing Sylvia Plath. I got the idea for this blog and the subsequent paper from a discussion that we had. In turn, I helped her with a similarly in-depth look at Plath's Lady Lazarus that she wanted to pursue.

Wildcard:

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CodyNaylor/2009/09/trifles_by_susan_glaspell_earl.html

The above entry was originally posted as a response to chapter 3, but I also used it in a later blog in which I was also supposed to respond to Trifles. This entry discusses the overtones of feminism that Susan Glaspell worked into her one-act play. I took a long time to create this entry and really thought that I made a good point. I was disappointed that more of my classmates did not read and respond to it...

 

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