DiannaGriffin: December 2009 Archives

Late

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Because I posted this blog late, I was able to listen to the class discussion over the freedom that press is given.  Haiman states that "53% of Americans said that the press is given too much freedom."

I don't think this is neccessarily true.  However, Greata Carol's blog "With great power, comes great responsibility," states that because the press is given freedom, they should make sure that they don't take advantage of that freedom.

Obviously there are many things that the press shouldn't do, but there are also many things that society shoud know, but a select few people just don't want them knowing.  Celebrities are a major issue.  If you're in the spot light, then you should expect that people want to know what you're up to.  However, journalists should repsect privacy, but if you say something negative, you better believe the press will be all over that.

EL 227

Do Your Job the Best Way You Can

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Robert J. Haiman states, "Several of the elected and appointed office holders in our roundtables expressed frustration with reporters who seem absolutely convinced -- at the very beginning of

the reporting process and long before all of the bases had been touched -- that their story is going to be a blockbuster. They said they often felt that reporters had their minds fully made up by the time they approached key figures to get their versions of events" (57).

This quotes annoys me.  Don't we want people to be positive with thier work.  I know I second guess myself when I write a paper, but my professors are always telling me to keep a positive attitude.  Even if a reporter's story doesn't become a "blockbuster," they should still be able to take pride in the work that they accomplished.  It's their job.  If they are positive about their story before starting it, then they are more likely to work hard on it.

In Angela Palumbo's blog, English Paper vs Journalism, she discusses why people love their thesis from the beginning.

EL 227

Portfolio 4

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Coverage: Here is the fourth and last list of blogs that I have written for my newswriting class at Seton Hill University.

Finding What is Lost-This blog discusses the The New York Times website, and the article that I read in it.  The article discussed how the faces of unsolved crime victims were placed on playing cards and sold to prison inmates.  My blog discusses the use of this article on the website.

I'm Dirty-In this blog I talk about a website that is interactive.  This website shows landfill effects, and the benefits of recycling.  I discuss how this website is useful in teaching about recycling.

Let Me Make a Comment-This is another blog that discusses an online newspaper.  I enjoyed this website because of the way in which it was designed.  It was useful and interesting.

BOOOOORRRRIING-Compared to The Harvard Crimson, I found The Cavalier Daily to be boring, and confusing.  This blog shows why I found the website to be this way, and ways in which it can be improved.

Do Your Job the Best Way You Can-In this blog I discuss why reporters should love their ideas from the beginning.  I believe that we should all be positive with our work before we start the research process.

Late-In this blog, I discuss how the press is not given too much freedom.  They are only asked to respect the privacy of others.

Depth: The entries in which I feel that I have made valiant effort.

Finding What is Lost-This blog discusses the The New York Times website, and the article that I read in it. I received two comments on this blog, and even if I had not received comments on this, I believe that I have made some good points.

Let Me Make a Comment-In this blog I talked about how I liked the layout of a certain website.  I believe that I went into depth because I took the time to click through the website, and then I described each step that I took.  This blog also received two comments.

BOOOOORRRRIING-In this blog, I compared the layouts of two websites.  This blog goes into depth because I was able to fully explain each website and how they functioned.

Do Your Job the Best Way You Can-I believe that this blog really focuses on some issues that are present in society.  It almost seems as the elected officials and representatives that are quoted in Haiman's book, are actually jealous of reporters.

Interaction:

Series-Katie Vann

Katie talks about how she enjoys The New York Times website.  She also provides readers with links to each part of the story that she read.  I agreed in saying that the site was easy to use. However, I sometimes clicked around too much, and then I couldn't find my way back.

All I Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten-Richelle Dodaro

In this blog, Richelle talks about sensitivity issues in journalism.  I think that journalists should be sensitive to all aspects of emotions.  Richelle talks about race, and I describe that race is not the only issue.

Skepticism Can Be a Good Thing-Jennifer Prex

Jennifer talks about keeping an open mind when reading or watching the news.  I agree in saying that the news can sometimes be intentionally misleading.

Refreshingly Informative, But a Bit Sluggish-Malcom Callaghan

Malcolm claims that the websites he observed were a bit childish.  I agreed in saying that they might make them simple so that everyone is able to easily find everything on the page.

Morbidly Twisted Links -Matt Henderson

In his blog, Matt talks about how links can make things difficult.  I agree with him.  I believe that links should sometimes be eliminated if the article is self-explanatory.

Cluttered-Kaitlin Monier

Kaitlin believes that  The Harvard Crimson was cluttered and too busy.  I explained that I liked the way it was put together, and it made it easier for me to use it.

Another Gulp of Sugar Free Lemonade-Malcolm Callaghan

Malcolm talks about how The Cavalier Daily  was boring and unattractive.  I agreed.  I believe that in order for people to want to read something, then there has to be something that initially catches their eye.  There was nothing that initially caught my eye on this website.

Timeliness: These blogs have been written and posted in a timely manner.

Finding What is Lost

I'm Dirty

Let Me Make a Comment

BOOOOORRRRIING

Discussion:

Finding What is Lost

Aja told me that my blog was a great idea, and she also suggested that I look at Josie's blog.  Jeanine also commented on my blog and left a link that related to the entry.

Let Me Make a Comment

Aja agreed with me in saying that The Harvard Crimson was an interesting website.  She also describes that this could be a good way for the Setonian Online to layout their website.  Jessie also commented on my blog ans said that even though the page was pretty cluttered, she enjoyed being able to choose from a lot of things.

BOOOOORRRRIING

Matt commented on this blog and stated that he also believed The Harvard Crimson looked more professional than The Cavalier Daily .  He also pointed out that The Cavalier Daily  had many negative comments on the website, whereas The Harvard Crimson did not.  Aja also pointed out that the Cavalier did not update as much as the Crimson.

Xenoblogging:

Do Your Job the Best Way You Can-I have linked this blog to a blog by Angela Palumbo.

Late-I have linked this blog to a blog by Greta Carol.

Wildcard:

Do Your Job the Best Way You Can-I feel that this is my best and most interesting blog in this part of the semester.  I think that I have addressed some major issues and provided efficient feedback on the issue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Longer-than-Usual? Ugh

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Chapter 10 in "Writing about Literature," by Edgar V. Roberts states, "Symbolism and allegory, like metaphors and similes (see Chapter 9) are modes that expand meaning" (149).

In many of my English classes, I have been taught the meaning of symbolism.  However, I did not ever realize that it actually "expanded meaning."  It signifies the certain objects, people, and places, but how does it expand meaning?  It does this by making  a person, place, or an object relatable to the readers.  If one of those items provides no symbolism for the reader, then they have no meaning.  Like Roberts says, "A beloved animal may cause a widow to remember her love for her departed husband" (149).  This same animal, however, could just be a dog running down the street.  The beloved animal helps the reader to relate to the situation.

Roberts states that "symbolism" and "allegory" are similar to "metaphor" and "similes" because they expand meaning.  I never really thought of this concept because I always figured the metaphors and similes were used to stretch (different from expand I'll explain) meaning.  By stretch I mean to stretch the truth.  When I say that "my boyfriend is as big as an elephant," I don't really mean that he that big, I just mean that he has very large muscles.

In Chapter 16 of "Writing about Literature," Roberts claims that "Everything written, spoken, painted, or composed reflects the period of its composition" (232).  At first, I was actually going to try and fight this statement, but then I realized that it is true.  In my argument I was going to use the book "1984," by George Orwell.  I was going to say that it doesn't represent the period of its composition because it was written to represent another period.  However, because it was written in this way, it reflects the views of actual society during the time it was written.  George Orwell wanted to show readers how government could possibly control their minds.  So, sorry Roberts.

EL 237

What or Who Changed Ebenezer Scrooge?

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Because I am writing this blog late, I listened to the class discussion about the end of the book "A Christmas Carol," by Charles Dickens.  In class, we discussed what really changed Scrooge.  Was it one of the three ghosts that he met, or was he going to change all along?

I believe that the ghosts did help in Scrooge's transition, but I think the real reason behind his change is Tiny Tim.  Scrooge never really had a father that cared about him the way Bob Cratchit cares about Tiny Tim.  Scrooge sees this relationship, and I believe that he wants to be a part of it.  He even treats Tiny Tim as a son once he becomes acquainted with the family.  Scrooge does not want to see this relationship die when Tiny Tim dies, so he changes his ways and saves his life.

Jessie Krehlik also discusses Scrooge's involvement with Tiny Tim in her blog, Happy Ending for All.

EL 237

Strangle Me...Not

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The journal article that I used is "Browning's PORPHYRIA'S LOVER," by Catherine Ross.  The article discussed Browning's poems tended to examine many kinds of neurotic, insane behavior.  Ross also mentioned that "Porphyria's Loever" specifically focused on erotic asphyxiation.

 

In my presentation, I focused on the foreshadwing that Browning uses throughout the poem.  I mentioned Josie's blog in which she believed that there was no foreshadowing.  I also discussed how Porphyria seems to predict her own death.  I mentioned Jessie Krehlik's blog in which she noticed that Porphyria did not put up a fight at all.  I then mentioned Jessica Orlowski's blog where she described how Porphyria may have been cheating on her lover.

 

At the end of my presentation, I tied in the article's topic of erotic asphyxiation.  I discussed the "burning kiss" in line 49, implying that the speaker had a sexual desire for Porphyria rather than a possessive desire.

EL 237 

Well, I Thought it was Love

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In chapter 7 of "Writing about Literature," Roberts states that, "you might state that an idea in Chekhov's The Bear is "love," but it would be difficult to discuss anything more unless you make an assertion promising an argument" (119).

My biggest issue with thesis statements that involve themes, is that I can not ever find an argument that people can disagree with.  I could say that the characters in The Bear are in love, but who would actually argue that.  It would be better to actually say that they are not in love.  I can support this claim, and it is a rational argument.

EL 237

Is Being a Bear Really a Bad Thing?

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Throughout the play, "The Bear: A Joke in One Act," by Anton Chekhov, I noticed that insults and societal taboos were a major theme.  In the very beginning of the play, Mrs. Popov is shown to be mourning.  Her servant, who is obviously a lower social class than her, makes fun of her for mourning so long.  He tells her a story about his wife dying and says that, "My wife died when her time came, too...Well? I grieved, I wept for a month; the old lady wasn't worth a second more" (384).  Even though Luka's, the servant's, wife does not even have a live part in this play, she is insulted. 

Towards the middle of the play, Mrs. Popov calls Smirnov a "bear."  I can see how this could be taken as an insult, but I don't think that I would take it very seriously.  I laughed when she calls him that because she seems surprised at the fact that she even said it, and Smirnov is very offended.  If I were a man, I might even take this as a compliment.  I mean bears are big and burly.  Don't men want to be big and burly as well?

Click here to look at an in depth overview, written by Melissa Schwenk, of "The Bear: A Joke in One Act."

EL 237

Portfolio 4

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Coverage: Here is the fourth list of blogs that I have posted at this point in the semester.

Is Being a Bear Really a Bad Thing?-This blog discusses how Anton Chekhov uses insults as a theme for his play.  I believe that being called a bear could actually be taken as a compliment rather than an insult.

Well, I Thought it was Love-This blog reflects on the fact that it can sometimes be extremely difficult to find an argument that people will disagree with.  This is my biggest issue when writing a paper.

Strangle Me...Not-This blog discusses the presentation that I made in class on "Porphyria's Lover."  In my presentation, I cited an article that discussed erotic asphyxiation.  I believe that this may have been a theme in this poem.  I also believe that sexual fantasies were a theme in many of Browning's works.

Poetry is Expressive-In this blog, I talk about how I associate poetry with rhymes.  If poems did not have sound, rhythm, or rhyme, then it would be just another story.

So, What am I Supposed to Do?-If English is eliminated at Seton Hill, then I would have to transfer schools.  I have put so much work into my major already that if it were taken away from me, I would not be able to do anything else.  It's sad that English is declining because it is one of the most important aspects of society.

Yea, I Get It-So, is Marley dead, or is he faking it because I don't get it.  Just kidding.  In this blog, I compare the newest movie version of "A Christmas Carol" to the actual book.  I almost always think that books are better than the movies that are made out of them, but in this instance I enjoyed them equally. 

What or Who Changed Ebenezer Scrooge?-I believe that Tiny Tim is the real reason behind Scrooge's change.  The ghosts put him on the path, but Tiny Tim and his father's love cause Scrooge to realize his wrong doing.

Longer than Usual? Ugh-In this blog I discuss the "meaning" behind symbolism and allegory.  I also try to start a fight with Roberts, but in the end, I end up agreeing with him.

Depth: The entries in which I feel that I have made valiant effort.

Is Being a Bear Really a Bad Thing?-I believe that this entry goes into great depth because I actually wrote my research paper about this.  However, I have talked about a different theme in my blog than I did in my paper.  I feel that by doing this, I have explored multiple themes in the play.

Well, I Thought it was Love-This blog presented an idea that many people did not see, and they also disagreed with it.  I presented on the fact that "Porphyria's Lover" used erotic asphyxiation as a theme.  Many people were slightly shocked when I presented this in class, and I believe that by taking an idea that is beyond normal and supporting it, I have gone in depth into the subject.

Poetry is Expressive-You can't have poetry with either sound, rhythm, or rhyme.  I am able to describe why at least one of these elements is needed in order to have a poem.  This shows my understanding in the area of poetry.

So, What am I Supposed to Do?-This blog discusses the decline of English in society.  I feel that this blog is in depth because I relate it to real society.  As English students it is possible that our major could be eliminated.  Seton Hill is a small school, and if we were to lose some of our funding, then there is a large possibility that the English department could be cut.

Longer than Usual? Ugh-I feel that this blog really goes into depth, not because it is long, but because of the content.  I feel that I have attacked a few topics that Roberts has discussed in "Writing about Literature," and I have made some very good points.

Interaction:

How is shooting a chicken different from shooting anything else?-Karyssa Blair

In this blog I have commented on the title.  Karyssa does not actually discuss the title.  She discusses another point that is related to the quote the title is talking about.  I think that it is interesting to see that many different points of view can be drawn from one question.

Oats, Out...Moving on...In -Gladys Mares

In this blog, Gladys discusses how Mrs. Popov lost her identity when she lost her husband.  I point out that during that time period, the men were the ones who held the jobs and provided the money.  However, Mrs. Popov was the landowner, and she provided the money to her husband. 

Hoorah for Short Hair?-Josie Rush

This blog discusses the poem, "Porphyria's Lover."  I actually presented this poem to the class, and I used Josie's blog as an example.  In her blog, she states that she did not see a lot of foreshadowing.  I disagreed in saying that the storm and the weather foreshadowed Porphyria's death.

Well...That was Unexpected-Kayla Lesko

Kayla tells readers that she is surprised by the fact that Porphyria's lover actually strangles her.  I too was surprised when I read this.  I mean how many people will actually strangle a person they love dearly?

Roberts Got It Wrong: Vowel Sounds and the English Language-David Wilbanks

Dave points out a major problem in the way Roberts has described the use of the schwa sound in language.  This really interested me because it was a major section in this chapter.  Dave does a very good job of putting reasoning behind his argument.

"Quit your books..." Wait, where are you going?!?-Josie Rush

In this blog, Josie talks about the decline of the English department.  She explains that she doesn't want to be a teacher or a journalist, she just wants to write, even though they don't make a lot of money.  I, however, want to become a teacher, and they too do not make a lot of money.  I am able to relate to Josie's feelings in this blog.

What You're Missing!-Aja Hannah

Aja explains that she sometimes has a hard time trying to understand what Dickens is saying in "A Christmas Carol."  I enjoyed how descriptive he was, but sometimes I thought that he just needed to get to the point.  I really did like the book, but I'm still a movie fan (I know I should be shunned from English).

Christmas Carol Assumptions-Jessie Krehlik

Jessie discusses how she never thought of Scrooge's journey as a form of time travel.  I also did not ever see it in this way.  I always thought that he was just dreaming because he always seems to be waking up when he gets done with his journey.

Religion and Forgiveness-Gladys Mares

In this blog, Gladys talks about the fact that "A Christmas Carol" doesn't technically have to be associated with Christmas.  I found this to be slightly depressing.   For me, this story represents Christmas, and by taking Christmas away from it, then you also take away from the story.

Timeliness:

Poetry is Expressive-Written November 19, due November 20.

So, What am I Supposed to Do?-Written November 22, due November 23.

Longer than Usual? Ugh-Written December 4, due December 4.

Discussion:

So, What am I Supposed to Do?-On this blog, Gladys has mentioned that she too is afraid that English may be eliminated at Seton Hill.  Because she lives in California, she would have a hard time transferring schools.

Xenoblogging:

Is Being a Bear Really a Bad Thing?-I have linked this blog to Melissa Scwenk's blog The Real Joke.

Strangle Me...Not-I have linked this blog to Josie Rush's, Jessie Krehlik's, and Jessica Orlowski's blogs.

What or Who Changed Ebenezer Scrooge?-I have linked this blog to Jessie Krehlik's blog Happy Ending for All.

Wildcard:

Well, I Thought it was Love-I really enjoy this blog because of the wild theme that it displays. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Late

Because I posted this blog late, I was able to listen to the class discussion over the freedom that press is given.  Haiman states that "53% of Americans said that the press is given too much freedom."

I don't think this is neccessarily true.  However, Greata Carol's blog "With great power, comes great responsibility," states that because the press is given freedom, they should make sure that they don't take advantage of that freedom.

Obviously there are many things that the press shouldn't do, but there are also many things that society shoud know, but a select few people just don't want them knowing.  Celebrities are a major issue.  If you're in the spot light, then you should expect that people want to know what you're up to.  However, journalists should repsect privacy, but if you say something negative, you better believe the press will be all over that.

EL 227

Do Your Job the Best Way You Can

Robert J. Haiman states, "Several of the elected and appointed office holders in our roundtables expressed frustration with reporters who seem absolutely convinced -- at the very beginning of

the reporting process and long before all of the bases had been touched -- that their story is going to be a blockbuster. They said they often felt that reporters had their minds fully made up by the time they approached key figures to get their versions of events" (57).

This quotes annoys me.  Don't we want people to be positive with thier work.  I know I second guess myself when I write a paper, but my professors are always telling me to keep a positive attitude.  Even if a reporter's story doesn't become a "blockbuster," they should still be able to take pride in the work that they accomplished.  It's their job.  If they are positive about their story before starting it, then they are more likely to work hard on it.

In Angela Palumbo's blog, English Paper vs Journalism, she discusses why people love their thesis from the beginning.

EL 227

Portfolio 4

Coverage: Here is the fourth and last list of blogs that I have written for my newswriting class at Seton Hill University.

Finding What is Lost-This blog discusses the The New York Times website, and the article that I read in it.  The article discussed how the faces of unsolved crime victims were placed on playing cards and sold to prison inmates.  My blog discusses the use of this article on the website.

I'm Dirty-In this blog I talk about a website that is interactive.  This website shows landfill effects, and the benefits of recycling.  I discuss how this website is useful in teaching about recycling.

Let Me Make a Comment-This is another blog that discusses an online newspaper.  I enjoyed this website because of the way in which it was designed.  It was useful and interesting.

BOOOOORRRRIING-Compared to The Harvard Crimson, I found The Cavalier Daily to be boring, and confusing.  This blog shows why I found the website to be this way, and ways in which it can be improved.

Do Your Job the Best Way You Can-In this blog I discuss why reporters should love their ideas from the beginning.  I believe that we should all be positive with our work before we start the research process.

Late-In this blog, I discuss how the press is not given too much freedom.  They are only asked to respect the privacy of others.

Depth: The entries in which I feel that I have made valiant effort.

Finding What is Lost-This blog discusses the The New York Times website, and the article that I read in it. I received two comments on this blog, and even if I had not received comments on this, I believe that I have made some good points.

Let Me Make a Comment-In this blog I talked about how I liked the layout of a certain website.  I believe that I went into depth because I took the time to click through the website, and then I described each step that I took.  This blog also received two comments.

BOOOOORRRRIING-In this blog, I compared the layouts of two websites.  This blog goes into depth because I was able to fully explain each website and how they functioned.

Do Your Job the Best Way You Can-I believe that this blog really focuses on some issues that are present in society.  It almost seems as the elected officials and representatives that are quoted in Haiman's book, are actually jealous of reporters.

Interaction:

Series-Katie Vann

Katie talks about how she enjoys The New York Times website.  She also provides readers with links to each part of the story that she read.  I agreed in saying that the site was easy to use. However, I sometimes clicked around too much, and then I couldn't find my way back.

All I Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten-Richelle Dodaro

In this blog, Richelle talks about sensitivity issues in journalism.  I think that journalists should be sensitive to all aspects of emotions.  Richelle talks about race, and I describe that race is not the only issue.

Skepticism Can Be a Good Thing-Jennifer Prex

Jennifer talks about keeping an open mind when reading or watching the news.  I agree in saying that the news can sometimes be intentionally misleading.

Refreshingly Informative, But a Bit Sluggish-Malcom Callaghan

Malcolm claims that the websites he observed were a bit childish.  I agreed in saying that they might make them simple so that everyone is able to easily find everything on the page.

Morbidly Twisted Links -Matt Henderson

In his blog, Matt talks about how links can make things difficult.  I agree with him.  I believe that links should sometimes be eliminated if the article is self-explanatory.

Cluttered-Kaitlin Monier

Kaitlin believes that  The Harvard Crimson was cluttered and too busy.  I explained that I liked the way it was put together, and it made it easier for me to use it.

Another Gulp of Sugar Free Lemonade-Malcolm Callaghan

Malcolm talks about how The Cavalier Daily  was boring and unattractive.  I agreed.  I believe that in order for people to want to read something, then there has to be something that initially catches their eye.  There was nothing that initially caught my eye on this website.

Timeliness: These blogs have been written and posted in a timely manner.

Finding What is Lost

I'm Dirty

Let Me Make a Comment

BOOOOORRRRIING

Discussion:

Finding What is Lost

Aja told me that my blog was a great idea, and she also suggested that I look at Josie's blog.  Jeanine also commented on my blog and left a link that related to the entry.

Let Me Make a Comment

Aja agreed with me in saying that The Harvard Crimson was an interesting website.  She also describes that this could be a good way for the Setonian Online to layout their website.  Jessie also commented on my blog ans said that even though the page was pretty cluttered, she enjoyed being able to choose from a lot of things.

BOOOOORRRRIING

Matt commented on this blog and stated that he also believed The Harvard Crimson looked more professional than The Cavalier Daily .  He also pointed out that The Cavalier Daily  had many negative comments on the website, whereas The Harvard Crimson did not.  Aja also pointed out that the Cavalier did not update as much as the Crimson.

Xenoblogging:

Do Your Job the Best Way You Can-I have linked this blog to a blog by Angela Palumbo.

Late-I have linked this blog to a blog by Greta Carol.

Wildcard:

Do Your Job the Best Way You Can-I feel that this is my best and most interesting blog in this part of the semester.  I think that I have addressed some major issues and provided efficient feedback on the issue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Longer-than-Usual? Ugh

Chapter 10 in "Writing about Literature," by Edgar V. Roberts states, "Symbolism and allegory, like metaphors and similes (see Chapter 9) are modes that expand meaning" (149).

In many of my English classes, I have been taught the meaning of symbolism.  However, I did not ever realize that it actually "expanded meaning."  It signifies the certain objects, people, and places, but how does it expand meaning?  It does this by making  a person, place, or an object relatable to the readers.  If one of those items provides no symbolism for the reader, then they have no meaning.  Like Roberts says, "A beloved animal may cause a widow to remember her love for her departed husband" (149).  This same animal, however, could just be a dog running down the street.  The beloved animal helps the reader to relate to the situation.

Roberts states that "symbolism" and "allegory" are similar to "metaphor" and "similes" because they expand meaning.  I never really thought of this concept because I always figured the metaphors and similes were used to stretch (different from expand I'll explain) meaning.  By stretch I mean to stretch the truth.  When I say that "my boyfriend is as big as an elephant," I don't really mean that he that big, I just mean that he has very large muscles.

In Chapter 16 of "Writing about Literature," Roberts claims that "Everything written, spoken, painted, or composed reflects the period of its composition" (232).  At first, I was actually going to try and fight this statement, but then I realized that it is true.  In my argument I was going to use the book "1984," by George Orwell.  I was going to say that it doesn't represent the period of its composition because it was written to represent another period.  However, because it was written in this way, it reflects the views of actual society during the time it was written.  George Orwell wanted to show readers how government could possibly control their minds.  So, sorry Roberts.

EL 237

What or Who Changed Ebenezer Scrooge?

Because I am writing this blog late, I listened to the class discussion about the end of the book "A Christmas Carol," by Charles Dickens.  In class, we discussed what really changed Scrooge.  Was it one of the three ghosts that he met, or was he going to change all along?

I believe that the ghosts did help in Scrooge's transition, but I think the real reason behind his change is Tiny Tim.  Scrooge never really had a father that cared about him the way Bob Cratchit cares about Tiny Tim.  Scrooge sees this relationship, and I believe that he wants to be a part of it.  He even treats Tiny Tim as a son once he becomes acquainted with the family.  Scrooge does not want to see this relationship die when Tiny Tim dies, so he changes his ways and saves his life.

Jessie Krehlik also discusses Scrooge's involvement with Tiny Tim in her blog, Happy Ending for All.

EL 237

Strangle Me...Not

The journal article that I used is "Browning's PORPHYRIA'S LOVER," by Catherine Ross.  The article discussed Browning's poems tended to examine many kinds of neurotic, insane behavior.  Ross also mentioned that "Porphyria's Loever" specifically focused on erotic asphyxiation.

 

In my presentation, I focused on the foreshadwing that Browning uses throughout the poem.  I mentioned Josie's blog in which she believed that there was no foreshadowing.  I also discussed how Porphyria seems to predict her own death.  I mentioned Jessie Krehlik's blog in which she noticed that Porphyria did not put up a fight at all.  I then mentioned Jessica Orlowski's blog where she described how Porphyria may have been cheating on her lover.

 

At the end of my presentation, I tied in the article's topic of erotic asphyxiation.  I discussed the "burning kiss" in line 49, implying that the speaker had a sexual desire for Porphyria rather than a possessive desire.

EL 237 

Well, I Thought it was Love

In chapter 7 of "Writing about Literature," Roberts states that, "you might state that an idea in Chekhov's The Bear is "love," but it would be difficult to discuss anything more unless you make an assertion promising an argument" (119).

My biggest issue with thesis statements that involve themes, is that I can not ever find an argument that people can disagree with.  I could say that the characters in The Bear are in love, but who would actually argue that.  It would be better to actually say that they are not in love.  I can support this claim, and it is a rational argument.

EL 237

Is Being a Bear Really a Bad Thing?

Throughout the play, "The Bear: A Joke in One Act," by Anton Chekhov, I noticed that insults and societal taboos were a major theme.  In the very beginning of the play, Mrs. Popov is shown to be mourning.  Her servant, who is obviously a lower social class than her, makes fun of her for mourning so long.  He tells her a story about his wife dying and says that, "My wife died when her time came, too...Well? I grieved, I wept for a month; the old lady wasn't worth a second more" (384).  Even though Luka's, the servant's, wife does not even have a live part in this play, she is insulted. 

Towards the middle of the play, Mrs. Popov calls Smirnov a "bear."  I can see how this could be taken as an insult, but I don't think that I would take it very seriously.  I laughed when she calls him that because she seems surprised at the fact that she even said it, and Smirnov is very offended.  If I were a man, I might even take this as a compliment.  I mean bears are big and burly.  Don't men want to be big and burly as well?

Click here to look at an in depth overview, written by Melissa Schwenk, of "The Bear: A Joke in One Act."

EL 237

Portfolio 4

Coverage: Here is the fourth list of blogs that I have posted at this point in the semester.

Is Being a Bear Really a Bad Thing?-This blog discusses how Anton Chekhov uses insults as a theme for his play.  I believe that being called a bear could actually be taken as a compliment rather than an insult.

Well, I Thought it was Love-This blog reflects on the fact that it can sometimes be extremely difficult to find an argument that people will disagree with.  This is my biggest issue when writing a paper.

Strangle Me...Not-This blog discusses the presentation that I made in class on "Porphyria's Lover."  In my presentation, I cited an article that discussed erotic asphyxiation.  I believe that this may have been a theme in this poem.  I also believe that sexual fantasies were a theme in many of Browning's works.

Poetry is Expressive-In this blog, I talk about how I associate poetry with rhymes.  If poems did not have sound, rhythm, or rhyme, then it would be just another story.

So, What am I Supposed to Do?-If English is eliminated at Seton Hill, then I would have to transfer schools.  I have put so much work into my major already that if it were taken away from me, I would not be able to do anything else.  It's sad that English is declining because it is one of the most important aspects of society.

Yea, I Get It-So, is Marley dead, or is he faking it because I don't get it.  Just kidding.  In this blog, I compare the newest movie version of "A Christmas Carol" to the actual book.  I almost always think that books are better than the movies that are made out of them, but in this instance I enjoyed them equally. 

What or Who Changed Ebenezer Scrooge?-I believe that Tiny Tim is the real reason behind Scrooge's change.  The ghosts put him on the path, but Tiny Tim and his father's love cause Scrooge to realize his wrong doing.

Longer than Usual? Ugh-In this blog I discuss the "meaning" behind symbolism and allegory.  I also try to start a fight with Roberts, but in the end, I end up agreeing with him.

Depth: The entries in which I feel that I have made valiant effort.

Is Being a Bear Really a Bad Thing?-I believe that this entry goes into great depth because I actually wrote my research paper about this.  However, I have talked about a different theme in my blog than I did in my paper.  I feel that by doing this, I have explored multiple themes in the play.

Well, I Thought it was Love-This blog presented an idea that many people did not see, and they also disagreed with it.  I presented on the fact that "Porphyria's Lover" used erotic asphyxiation as a theme.  Many people were slightly shocked when I presented this in class, and I believe that by taking an idea that is beyond normal and supporting it, I have gone in depth into the subject.

Poetry is Expressive-You can't have poetry with either sound, rhythm, or rhyme.  I am able to describe why at least one of these elements is needed in order to have a poem.  This shows my understanding in the area of poetry.

So, What am I Supposed to Do?-This blog discusses the decline of English in society.  I feel that this blog is in depth because I relate it to real society.  As English students it is possible that our major could be eliminated.  Seton Hill is a small school, and if we were to lose some of our funding, then there is a large possibility that the English department could be cut.

Longer than Usual? Ugh-I feel that this blog really goes into depth, not because it is long, but because of the content.  I feel that I have attacked a few topics that Roberts has discussed in "Writing about Literature," and I have made some very good points.

Interaction:

How is shooting a chicken different from shooting anything else?-Karyssa Blair

In this blog I have commented on the title.  Karyssa does not actually discuss the title.  She discusses another point that is related to the quote the title is talking about.  I think that it is interesting to see that many different points of view can be drawn from one question.

Oats, Out...Moving on...In -Gladys Mares

In this blog, Gladys discusses how Mrs. Popov lost her identity when she lost her husband.  I point out that during that time period, the men were the ones who held the jobs and provided the money.  However, Mrs. Popov was the landowner, and she provided the money to her husband. 

Hoorah for Short Hair?-Josie Rush

This blog discusses the poem, "Porphyria's Lover."  I actually presented this poem to the class, and I used Josie's blog as an example.  In her blog, she states that she did not see a lot of foreshadowing.  I disagreed in saying that the storm and the weather foreshadowed Porphyria's death.

Well...That was Unexpected-Kayla Lesko

Kayla tells readers that she is surprised by the fact that Porphyria's lover actually strangles her.  I too was surprised when I read this.  I mean how many people will actually strangle a person they love dearly?

Roberts Got It Wrong: Vowel Sounds and the English Language-David Wilbanks

Dave points out a major problem in the way Roberts has described the use of the schwa sound in language.  This really interested me because it was a major section in this chapter.  Dave does a very good job of putting reasoning behind his argument.

"Quit your books..." Wait, where are you going?!?-Josie Rush

In this blog, Josie talks about the decline of the English department.  She explains that she doesn't want to be a teacher or a journalist, she just wants to write, even though they don't make a lot of money.  I, however, want to become a teacher, and they too do not make a lot of money.  I am able to relate to Josie's feelings in this blog.

What You're Missing!-Aja Hannah

Aja explains that she sometimes has a hard time trying to understand what Dickens is saying in "A Christmas Carol."  I enjoyed how descriptive he was, but sometimes I thought that he just needed to get to the point.  I really did like the book, but I'm still a movie fan (I know I should be shunned from English).

Christmas Carol Assumptions-Jessie Krehlik

Jessie discusses how she never thought of Scrooge's journey as a form of time travel.  I also did not ever see it in this way.  I always thought that he was just dreaming because he always seems to be waking up when he gets done with his journey.

Religion and Forgiveness-Gladys Mares

In this blog, Gladys talks about the fact that "A Christmas Carol" doesn't technically have to be associated with Christmas.  I found this to be slightly depressing.   For me, this story represents Christmas, and by taking Christmas away from it, then you also take away from the story.

Timeliness:

Poetry is Expressive-Written November 19, due November 20.

So, What am I Supposed to Do?-Written November 22, due November 23.

Longer than Usual? Ugh-Written December 4, due December 4.

Discussion:

So, What am I Supposed to Do?-On this blog, Gladys has mentioned that she too is afraid that English may be eliminated at Seton Hill.  Because she lives in California, she would have a hard time transferring schools.

Xenoblogging:

Is Being a Bear Really a Bad Thing?-I have linked this blog to Melissa Scwenk's blog The Real Joke.

Strangle Me...Not-I have linked this blog to Josie Rush's, Jessie Krehlik's, and Jessica Orlowski's blogs.

What or Who Changed Ebenezer Scrooge?-I have linked this blog to Jessie Krehlik's blog Happy Ending for All.

Wildcard:

Well, I Thought it was Love-I really enjoy this blog because of the wild theme that it displays. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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