« January 2009 | Main | March 2009 »

February 2009 Archives

February 2, 2009

The Space Between

The extrinsic data is not, however, read into the text. On the contrary, it is used to verify that which we read out of it (Hirsch 26).

In his essay, "Objective Interpretation," E. D. Hirsch explains the importance of considering author intent while evaluating literature. In his opinion, we should seek "extrinsic data" that will help us jump the gap between the probable and possible. I completely agree with this concept and appreciate his clarification that the "extrinsic data" we find should only be used to "verify" what we interpret from the text. I think that this method of analyzing literature provides the critic with the best of both worlds. He/she can read the text and come up with an creative interpretation on his/her own (this is the fun part, I think), but just to sure he/she doesn't get too carried away in the fun of finding different meanings within a text, the critic should always turn towards the "extrinsic" or extra sources that help ground our initial possible interpretations into probable realities.

Sweetened by the Sugar of Literature

According to Eagleton, in 19th century Victorian society, literature "could serve to place in cosmic perspective the petty demands of working people for decent living conditions or greater control over their own lives, and might even with luck come to render them oblivious of such issues in their high-minded contemplation of eternal truths and beauties" (22).

Continue reading "Sweetened by the Sugar of Literature" »

Solipsism

A less self-critical reader, on the other hand, approaches solipsism if he assumes that the text represents a perspicuous meaning simply because it represents an unalterable sequence of words.

Continue reading "Solipsism" »

The Bug of Writing

I verily believe she thinks it is the writing which made me sick!

Continue reading "The Bug of Writing" »

February 9, 2009

The Dead Know Nothing

If the ghost of Chaucer were to appear to us and swear that he saw nothing funny or ironic in the "Nun's Priest's Tale," we would have to revise our estimate, not of the poem, but of the critical sensibility of Chaucer's ghost (Keesey 15).

Continue reading "The Dead Know Nothing" »

Would you care for some tea, dear?

It is said that Tibetan tea, which is partly composed of rancid butter, is revolting to Western tastes if considered as tea but acceptable if considered as soup (Watson 31).

Continue reading "Would you care for some tea, dear?" »

On the Outside

We are in the realm of the comedian performing at a convention of comedians: since everybody knows the jokes, he need only refer to a gag by number, and the house breaks into laughter (McDonald 102).

Continue reading "On the Outside " »

February 15, 2009

Play the Game

According to Donald Keesey, formalists "claim no special expertise beyond well-developed powers of observation and a sharpened sense of what to look for. And we can all play the game" (79).

Continue reading "Play the Game" »

February 16, 2009

Make sure you water the plant when I'm gone.

...the elements of a poem are related to each other, not as blossoms juxtaposed in a bouquet, but as the blossoms are related to the other parts of a growing plant. The beauty of the poem is the flowering of the whole plant, and needs the stalk, the leaf, and the hidden roots. (Brooks 85)

Continue reading "Make sure you water the plant when I'm gone." »

O happy, happy day. Did I mention I was happy? Well, I am very happy.

You don't believe me, do you?

Continue reading "O happy, happy day. Did I mention I was happy? Well, I am very happy." »

Do you mean apostrophe or apostrophe?

Keat's ode features an abundance of apostrophes...(Kent 113)

Continue reading "Do you mean apostrophe or apostrophe?" »

Reality can't touch me. I'm in my bubble.

Frye insists that literature is an 'autonomous verbal structure' quite cut off from any reference beyond itself, a sealed and inward-looking realm which 'contain[s] life and reality in a system of verbal relationships'. All the system ever does is reshuffle its symbolic units in relation to each other, rather than in relation to any kind of reality outside it (Eagleton 80).

Continue reading "Reality can't touch me. I'm in my bubble. " »

February 26, 2009

The answerless question?

Accoding to David Bleich, "each person's most urgent motivations are to understand himself" (Keesey 137).

Continue reading "The answerless question?" »

Where's Waldo?

"The ideal reader, unlike the contemporary reader, is a purely fictional being; he has no basis in reality, and it is this very fact that makes him so useful" (Iser 142).

Continue reading "Where's Waldo?" »

Special offer: three for the price of one!

"...a credible argument might be made for reading "The Yellow Wallpaper" as Gilman's willful and purposeful misprision of "The Pit and the Pendulum" (Kolodny 197).

Continue reading "Special offer: three for the price of one!" »

And the word of the day is...

"...the narrator progressively gives up the attempt to record her reality and instead begins to read it--as symbolically adumbrated in her compulsion to discover a consistent and coherent pattern..." (Kolodny 199).

Continue reading "And the word of the day is..." »

Blogging for medicinal purposes

So, I guess this means we're about a third of the way done with the class. One set of blogs down, two more to go. While I'm no rookie blogger (Who could be after three Jerz classes?), I've been trying to improve my blogging skills. While haven't been the most perfect blogger, I do think that the work I've compiled this semester blogwise clearly outshines most of the work I've done in the past. Perhaps this is a direct result from the fact that I find blogging to be more useful this time around--in past semesters, it became a chore, and while (I'll admit it) I do often groan at the time-crunch blogging places on my already suffocated schedule, I look forward to and even depend upon the responses I write and receive on my blog weekly. While my past two Jerz classes were fairly straightforward (more basic level courses), this class has my head spinning in circles more often than not. Thus, blogging helps me stop the spinning, or at least pause it. At the very least, I avoid naseau and, at best, I find enjoyment and understanding. It's a win-win situation that may be the thing that keeps me out of the nut house this semester.

Coverage: Here's a list of all the blogs I've posted

Where's the Truth?
History is the Cheese on Literature's Macaroni
Sensation vs. Thought
Metonymy, synecdoche, smetonyche
Sweetened by the Sugar of Literature
The Bug of Writing
The Space Between
It's All About Me
The Dead Know Nothing
Would you care for some tea, dear?
On the Outside
I'm in my bubble
Play the Game
Did I mention I was happy?
Make sure you water the plant when I'm gone
Do you mean apostrophe or apostrophe?
The answerless question?
Where's Waldo?
Stuck in the Shadows
It's all about the reader...or is it?
Three for the price of one
And the word of the day is...

Depth: Here's where I spent a little extra time to devle deeper into my blogging topic

Sensation vs. Thought
Where's the Truth?
Did I mention I was happy?
I'm in my bubble

Interaction & Discussion: Here's where my blog or comments generate conversation, or even dispute about a subject

Where's the Truth?
History is the Cheese on Literature's Macaroni
Metonymy, Synecdoche, Smetonyche
The Space Between
Would you care for some tea, dear?

Timeliness: Here's where my blogs were posted early

Where's the Truth?
History is the Cheese on Literature's Macaroni
The Space Between
The Dead Know Nothing


Xenoblogging: Here's where I helped out my classmates with my comments

Comment on Derek's blog
Comment on Bethany B's blog
Comment on Jenna's blog
Comment on Erica's blog
Comment on Erica's blog

Wild Card: Here's my favorite blog so far

Make sure you water the plant when I'm gone
While this isn't the most academic of blogs, it's my favorite because I think it clearly shows in my writing that I'm enjoying the reading and reacting to it in a creative manner. This is the attitude I want to keep up during the semester. While I know some fatigue is inevitable (I'm feeling pretty tired right now, actually), I want to attempt to avoid a complete mental breakdown, and I think that keeping a positive attitude about even the smallest assignments, as I did in this blog, will help me avoid this burn-out.

How can one see clearly through all this shadow?

"Shadows present, foreshadowing deeper shadows to come" (Meliville 489).

Continue reading "How can one see clearly through all this shadow?" »

It's all about the reader...or is it?

...it is not only ambiguity or silence which occupies Melville's narrative, nor simply the ideological blindness of his central characters. Far more fundamental to the work's subversive movement is a deep-seated suspicion of the dynamics of narrative itself (Haegert qtd. in O'Connell 187).

Continue reading "It's all about the reader...or is it?" »

About February 2009

This page contains all entries posted to EllenEinsporn in February 2009. They are listed from oldest to newest.

January 2009 is the previous archive.

March 2009 is the next archive.

Many more can be found on the main index page or by looking through the archives.