The Raven

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"[...] repetition of sounds, words, phrasing, or concepts is used in literary works to create unity and emphasis" (Hamilton 98).

The example for that the book used from Othello is good, but I have better one.  Edgar Allen Poe's "The Raven" uses repetition to masterful degree.  The repetition of the phrase "never more" creates a sense of uneasiness permenates throughout the entire poem.

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7 Comments

I agree Ethan. "The Raven" is my favorite poem so I'm always happy when it comes up in a conversation. Great observation Ethan!

Nice analysis, Ethan! "The Raven" is one of my favorite poems too, Angela. The repetition of "nevermore" drives the speaker insane and just adds another chilling element to the poem.

Nice analysis, Ethan! "The Raven" is one of my favorite poems too, Angela. The repetition of "nevermore" drives the speaker insane and just adds another chilling element to the poem.

Awesome reference! "The Raven," in my opinion is a much better example of repetition, because it is something that we all know and can easily relate to! Not only does it create an eerie atmosphere and stress attetion, but it leads up to the climax of the poem!

I agree; even if you haven't read "The Raven", you definitely still know "never more". On the other hand, I've never read Othello and had absolutely no idea what the reference in the text was actually referring to. Good thing I actually know what repetition is, then. :)

That's a good example! The repetition of "Nevermore" adds to the tone of the poem and is effective.

Not only doesthe repetition of "never more" in "The Raven" create uneasiness, it also creates the despair that Poe was aiming for in writing this poem (since this was a reflection of his own soon-to-be mourning as his wife lay dying of tuberculosis, person #23948 to die of TB in Poe's life). Poe achieved that despair and then some.

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This page contains a single entry by EthanShepley published on March 3, 2008 3:47 PM.

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