October 2009 Archives

Is He Really That Bad?

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"The critical dislike of, or at least discomfort with, the ending is largely caused by the re-entrance of Tom onto the stage and the havoc that ensues" (Scott 188)

I have never read Tom Sawyer but I don't understand everyone's hatred towards him.  I don't know if I completely took him and the book wrong or what but he isn't the worst of characters.  As discussed in class, some that have read Tom Sawyer say that he is a lot nicer and likable in Huckleberry Finn.  So I guess my point is that I am confused on why people are so affected by Tom coming back at the end.  It almost seems that it ruined the book for them. 

I put this as discussion because it sparked a discussion in class dealing with Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn.

Seriously

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"Despite their patriotic rhetoric, they, like Pap, were unprepared to take seriously the implications of "freedom, justice, and equality" (Smith 369)

I thought this was really interesting that Smith compared a category of readers of Huckleberry Finn to Pap.  The readers were unable to accept and take seriously what the novel was showing and that was just like Pap.  The readers could relate to Pap in a way.  Wonder if that is why they didn't take it seriously.  They either misunderstood or ignored the demystification of race.  I feel like a lot may have ignored it because back then when they read it, race was a touchy subject so they might not have wanted to accept it. 

Now ya tell me

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"Mostly, these are works I've mentioned along the way, works I like and admire for a variety of reasons, works I think you might like as well" (Foster 281)

I just want to say thanks for mentioning that now.  The whole time I have been reading this book, I had no idea what books he was talking about and sometimes I have never heard of them either.  To be honest, knowing he was going to mention certain books doesn't mean I would have read them but I would probably have researched them or looked into them a little.  Foster said that he listed them in the Appendix which is at the end.  I don't know about anyone else but I read books from front cover to back cover.  I completely understand that he didn't make a whole list at the beginning of the book but he could have mentioned it. 

What if You Could Foresee the Future?

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So I am sitting here watching Flashforward and was wondering what I would do if I knew what was going to happen in the future.  I often say that I would like to see the future and see if all that I do is going to pay off but I think if I can see the future that will alter the way I do things.  If I would see the future and see if I get married and to whom, when I would see that person than would I act differently than I would have if I have never seen that person before.  I think that seeing the future would change the future or some cases make the future happen, like in Flashforward.  Just a thought.

Expect what?

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"We expect a certain amount of verisimilitude, of faithfulness to the world we know, in what we watch and what we read" (Foster 228)

Honestly, the reason I was first interested in this quote is because I have never seen, to my knowledge, verisimilitude.  So I reread the sentence many times, "We expect a certain amount of faithfulness in what we watch and what we read."  I think it is based on everyone's own opinion.  To say "we" is to assume a lot about everyone as a whole.  I also think to expect a certain something is the wrong way to approach a piece of literature.  With never reading or even hearing about what someone is about to read, their expectations of the book could be far fetched from what the book is actually about.  To expect a certain amount of faithfulness to the world is also a big expectation that readers have.  Read the book and take it how you should be and how the author wants it to be taken.

I chose this as depth because I went into the idea and topic more.  I have a big opinion on this matter and was able to go into more than some of the other topics.

That was then, this is now

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"This at of censorship received national publicity and inspired debate throughout the country." (Mailloux 48)

This sentence stood out to me because it shows how different now and then are.  They took this book off the shelves because of the way it was making boys and influencing them.  If you go to a bookstore, there are a lot more influential books then just one about the way a boy ran away and lived.  Times have changed a lot since then and a lot of people have made a living based on books that would not be acceptable back then.

Blogging Portfolio 2

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I accidentally deleted my portfolio 2 in order to start my portfolio 3 so if you are looking at this for the first time and something is missing can you please let me know because I had to redo it.  Thank You

 

This is the Blog Portfolio 2 from American Literature 1800-1915

Coverage: These are all the blogs that I have completed.

Chapter 4 - Thoreau

Chapter 13 - Thoreau

How to Read Literature Like a Professor - 13-15

How to Read Literature Like a Professor - 18, 19, 20

Edgar Allen Poe - The Raven

Edgar Allen Poe

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson

Uncle Tom's Cabin - Aiken

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - 1-10

How to Read Literature Like a Professor - I, 21, 22

Introduction to AHF - Smith

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - 11-35


Depth:  These are my entries that were in depth that people could relate too.

Chapter 13 - Thoreau

How to Read Literature Like a Professor - 18, 19, 20

Edgar Allen Poe

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - 11-35


Interaction:  These are some of the entries of my classmates that I commented on.

What Season are You Talking About? by Kayla Lesko

Thoughts on Wood and Life by Jessica Pierce

Follow Your Own Path by Jessica Apitsch


Discussions: These are my entries that peers commented on and created a discussion in one way or another.

How to Read Literature Like a Professor - 13-15

Chapter 4 - Thoreau

Uncle Tom's Cabin - Aiken


Timeliness:These are my entries that were posted before the Monday before each class.


Chapter 4 - Thoreau

Chapter 13 - Thoreau

How to Read Literature Like a Professor - 13-15

How to Read Literature Like a Professor - 18, 19, 20

Edgar Allen Poe - The Raven

Edgar Allen Poe

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson


Xenoblogging: These are entries of my classmates that I was the first to comment on.

What Season are You Talking About? by Kayla Lesko

Follow Your Own Path by Jessica Apitsch

 

Wildcard:  This is my entry about something other than what we read in the class.

School Holidays

Blogging Portfolio 3

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This is the Blog Portfolio 3 from American Literature 1800-1915.


For some of the topics, I have included a reason on why I chose it to be under the specific heading at the end of the blog.


Coverage: These are all the blogs that I have completed.


How to Read Literature Like a Professor - Ch. 23-24

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn 36-End

The Bad Boy Boom - Mailloux

How To Read Literature Like a Professor - Ch 25-26

There's More Honor - Scott....

Huck, Jim, and American Racial Discourse - Smith

John Henry

Address of Booker T. Washington

The Souls of Black Folk - Dubois

How to Read Literature Like a Professor - envoi

The Wonderful World of Oz - Baum


Depth:  These are my entries that were in depth that people could relate too.

 

How to Read Literature Like a Professor - Ch. 23-24

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

How To Read Literature Like a Professor - Ch 25-26

Address of Booker T. Washington

The Wonderful World of Oz - Baum

Interaction:  These are some of the entries of my classmates that I commented on.


Books smarts vs. street smarts by Heather Mourick.

Who Is Really Smarter? by Jennifer Prex

Ugh! I'm dying! by Jeremy Barrick

Oh John Henry by Katie Lantz

Du Bois's Unfair Attack by Jessica Aptisch

John Henry the mighty force of manual labor by Jeremy Barrick

There is No Place Like Home  by Katie Lantz

Foster is Still Forcing Me To Grow as Reader by Jessica Apitsch

 

Discussions: These are my entries that peers commented on and created a discussion in either class or on the blog.  Some comments have the same idea of me and some have conflicting ideas. 

How to Read Literature Like a Professor - Ch. 23-24

The Bad Boy Boom - Mailloux

There's More Honor - Scott


How to Read Literature Like a Professor - envoi 

Timeliness:These are my entries that were posted before the Monday before each class.

How to Read Literature Like a Professor - Ch. 23-24

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

How To Read Literature Like a Professor - Ch 25-26

Huck, Jim, and American Racial Discourse - Smith

How to Read Literature Like a Professor - envoi

There's More Honor - Scott


Xenoblogging: These are entries of my classmates that I was the first to comment on.


Oh John Henry by Katie Lantz

Who Is Really Smarter? by Jennifer Prex

 

Wildcard:  This is my entry about something other than what we read in the class.


What If You Could Foresee the Future?


The Truth

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"I called it borrowing, because that was what pap always called it; but Tom said it warn't borrowing, it was stealing." (Twain 279)

 

I commented on a blog about this before and thought it was interesting.  Huck is following his pap's footsteps and ways of life.  He doesn't like his ways and always hid when he came to town but then does what his pap does.  If it wasn't for his pap then he wouldn't have been through everything.  Another thing is, someone finally told him that it isn't borrowing, it is stealing.  One of the reasons Huck just kept saying it was borrowing was because he didn't know any different so he just kept doing it.  Now there is someone to guide him in the right way.  Even though Widow Douglas tried teaching him to be polite, this isn't something that he could have been taught in a house or in school.  It's one of those hands on things that he needed to be taught in the woods like this.

 

I chose to put this under depth.  Because I went into this more than most.  I had a lot of opinions and ideas on this topic.  It also had a comment that sparked more interaction.

Can't I Just Be Sick?

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"Naturally, what gets encoded in a literary disease is largely up to the writer and the reader."  (Foster 221)

This quote intrigued me. As I read the last couple chapters of Foster, I wondered why all these illnesses were made such a big deal.  Why can't a character in a story just get sick or a disease?  Why does every time a character get a sickness, is it made into a big deal and have to mean something?  When I read, I don't look for the meaning of why they got the sickness.  I look at it as a mountain in their life that they have to get over and learn how to cope with it.  It doesn't mean that they are happy or sad or depressed just because they got AIDS from their dad or whatever.  I am sure there are readers out there that also read and look at the symbolism of the sickness right away.  It's fully based upon the reader on how the sickness is taken.

I also thought of the idea of in a television show, when an actor or actress doesn't want to continue their role on that show, they often get sick and die.  That way they aren't on it and their character just doesn't disappear.  Another thing is what if the author thought that character was getting too boring or just needed to move on in their life.  They can just have they get sick and eventually die.  It is a really good way of ending a character because there are so many sicknesses out there.  The author can pick one that best suits the time, atmosphere, and situation without it seeming too out there.


I chose this blog as a depth blog because I went more into the idea of sickness.  I went outside the idea of sickness just in the book and went into tv.  I had a good understanding of what I was writing about and talking about. 

School holidays

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All through my elementary career, I have had parties at all major holidays.  Since then most have been cancelled, leaving children to 2 parties a year.  With Halloween coming up, aka the most exciting party that I had in elementary school, and the schools without a party, I decided to write about it.  The students are not only not allowed to have a party but they are not allowed to wear their costumes to school.  When I was in school, we had a parade and party full of games, candy and fun.  Now students are not allowed to have a parade or bring in candy which cuts out on the fun.  Someone I know said that there teacher gives them candy but are not allowed to tell anyone or they will not be able to get any anymore.  I just think this is ridiculous and that the kids should be able to have fun and enjoy a fun afternoon after a week full of classwork and tests.  They deserve a reward after doing all the work.  Just a thought.

leave the fortune?

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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

"Nothing couldn't be better" (167)

I thought this short line showed a lot about Huck.  He has been traveling on the river and through the woods.  He has had nothing but things that he found or killed in the woods or river to eat.  He travels at night so that he can't be seen and sleeps during the day hidden.  If he is hidden and sleeping during the day, it must not be very comfortable.  He doesn't have any home cooked meals or a bed to sleep in.  The Grangerford house is amazing to him.  He didn't even have a family like this with Miss Watson.  To him this was the best there was and they were very open and willing to take him in. 

He left all the nice hopsitality and family after he felt disturbed and nervous about staying.  He felt bad leaving Jim and doesn't know how to handle all of the good fortune that the family was giving them.

Put your feet in their shoes.

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"And at the last moment it is revealed that Jim was freed two months before through the highly implausible deathbed repentance of his owner, Miss Watson.  We feel as badly sold as did the audience for the Duke's and the King's presentation of the Royal Nonesuch" (Smith 324)

These particular lines stood out to me.  I thought it was interesting how Smith connected us to the audence watching the presentation.  He is trying to show us the feeling that the audience got so long ago.  I thought this was really interesting and a good point to use in his essay.

Meaningful or not?

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"Perhaps sometimes a scar is simply a scar, a short leg or a hunchback merely that." (Foster 200)

I always thought that a scar was just a scar and when mentioned in a book I never thought much about it.  I guess it means something but I never really looked further into it.  It's one of those little things that can mean so much and have so much of an impact on the characters past life and future life, depending on when the incident happened to get the scar.  A lot of scars are a reminder of something that have happened good or bad which make it hard to forget the bad incidents because of that scar.

Full of Bitter, already?

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Uncle Tom's Cabin

   "Eliza, my heart's full of bitterness. I can't trust in heaven." (78)


I think this says a lot about George.  He has something go wrong and now he is full of bitter and cannot trust God now.  It may be bad but he is going way off and very negative.  This is earlier in the dialogue so I think that this shows that he is very negative.


Change, please!!!

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Huckleberry Finn
"All I wanted was to go somewheres; all I wanted was a change, I warn't particular" (72)

I think this statement means a lot because he wasn't satisfied where he was.  He wanted a change no matter where what it was.  He would also be rude in order to find a change.  I feel like he isn't the smartest of people when he didn't realize that it was rude when he said that.  He just wants to get out of there and would do anything for a change.  I think this shows a little bit about the rest of the book.

Passion to Negativity. What?

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These are just some of my thoughts on some of the poems by Edgar Allen Poe.

Fairy Land
"Now deep shall be--O deep! The passion of our sleep!"

This stood out to me because when I think of sleep, I think of a deep sleep.  So it's just a deep sleep but this could also be death.  A sleep that is deep forever.  Saying the passion of our sleep could mean so much too because it's the passion of the sleep.  I looked up the different meanings of passion and was interested by this definition: the state of being acted upon or affected by something external, esp. something alien to one's nature or one's.  Then i thought back to the ray that he talked about and the moon ray.  I thought that it seemed weird or abnormal and thought that that definition fit. 

The Haunted Place
"...like a ghastly rapid river..."

I blogged about The Raven about Poe's great detail and use of negative words.  This is a negative detailed word and he also repeated it.  He used this in the same line that I blogged about in The Raven.   It is just another way that Poe uses his great detail and such strong words in his poems to stress the important of the subject.

Epigram for Wall street

I don't have a specific quote from this poem but just a opinion.  I thought it was absolutely hilarious!  I put all the poems in a word document to print them and it was in the middle of all of them.  It was a nice little break to all the seriousness.  I went into reading it like the rest trying to figure it out and it was fully there and open for truth.  I just thought it was very funny and entertaining. 


Which Is It?

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VI.
"And sigh for lack of heaven..."

XVII.
"I never spoke with God, Nor visited in heaven; Yet certain am I of the spot As if the chart were give."


I think it is interesting how Dickinson first talks about the lack of heaven in her one poem and then talks about how she never saw God or visited heaven but is certain of the spot.  It makes me wonder what her beliefs were and if she ever wrote about them truthfully.  Was she unsure about her beliefs that she wrote about both?  Did religion have any significance in her life.  This just stood out to me. 

I Do!?

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Emily Dickinson-XIII.
"To that new marriage, justified through Calvaries of Love!"

I really liked this poem.  It had a complete realm of possibilities of what it could be about.  Each stanza took me into a place of curiosity and guessing at what Emily was referring to.  It wasn't until the end that I realized what it was that she was talking about and that is marriage.  She used so many different ways to describe that day and each was so real and amazing.  It is one of those things that once you find out the answer and reread it, it all makes complete sense. 

Tell Me How You Really Feel!

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"What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore" (p. 3)

Throughout this whole poem, Poe uses very detailed words.  This line has so many negative words to describe the bird.  He is truly saying his meaning of the bird using such strong words and so many of them.  I just loved all of detail in the poem and this line was one of the best.  He obviously didn't like the bird and it was horrible and terrible to him. 

Born or Reborn?

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"And here's the thing he discovers: being born is painful.  And that goes whether you're born or reborn"  (Foster 155)

 

I have never read Ordinary People but after reading this section, I really want to.  I find this quote very interesting because the idea of being reborn is definitely something to think about.  Whether you're reborn from an accident or incident that happend and changed you or anything, it's weird how someone can be something and some way and then by a one second event change for the rest of their life.  He says in this quote that the character in the book saying being born or reborn is painful.  In his circumstances, I could understand why, because he was always in the shadow of his brother and never had the spotlight like his brother did.  Then when he was reborn, he had to live with the fact that he was the one that lived and the "amazing" brother died.  Along with that, only two people can look at him like he is and one is because his therapist didn't know him before the storm.  That would be painful.  I think that it depends on what your life is like and what events happen in your life that make it painful.  Also it depends on how you react after the tramatic event that will make something painful.  Some people can just deal with things and return back to normal while others have a very hard time and like the story in Foster, may try to end their life to get out of the misery.   

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This page is an archive of entries from October 2009 listed from newest to oldest.

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