JessicaApitsch: October 2009 Archives

Outside Sources Should Serve as a Means to an End

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"The class of literature, which is mainly responsible for all this folly is distributed all over the country in immense quantities" (44).

I find it interesting how in the past society was still trying to place all the blame for corruption on outside forces.  I am not denying that media and literature and movies do not have an impact on how we lead our lives, but I feel our intimate environment plays a much bigger role.  Parents especially look elsewhere to place blame too much and it even happened during the era of Huckleberry Finn.  I feel this is a very ignorant way of finding a solution.  There has always been and will always be all types of movies and literature with all sorts of messages which is the beauty of creativity. Continuously society has a way in selecting one type of work and using it as the ultimate cause of the current problem.  This is a good start to solving issues, especially close to home, but should only be a means to an end. This was just a short response to the relationship between outside sources and our actions and perhaps I will receive some feedback, especially pertaining to the era we are studying.    

Foster is Still Forcing Me To Grow as Reader

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"Our interest is not in the deterioration of the old priest but in what his condition is telling us about him, about a boy, about the story at large..." (214).

Once again Foster forces me to rethink the way I have been reading and even watching movies.  This quote stood out to me because many times I WOULD be very interested in the deterioration of that priest or whatever character it was. I would be more interested in the actual deterioration than what the deterioration was trying to tell us as I always feel so emotionally connected to tragedy stories in books and movies. I feel so connected that I probably miss the symbolism and metaphorical message behind it.  I am not saying I want to totally lose my emotions and turn into a robot reader, as I feel it allows me to gain a lot from reading or viewing a film, but Foster's points opens up another door for me. I feel once I put these to use I can feel connected to not only the personal emotion but also the literary meanings. 

Disappointment in the Characters, but not the novel.

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"So after all our hard work and trouble this escape'll go off perfectly flat" (299).

After the passage when Tom kept delaying the rescue, I experienced a good amount of annoyance towards him.  He went back to playing the same role as he did when we saw him in the beginning.  This passgage caused other characters to regress as well.  Huck returned to the follower position and Jim lost all his power he gained on the river.  I began to be disappointed in Huck as he, along with Tom, forgot Jim was a human being.  Even so, Huck still did show a few signs of hope, but Tom lost his chance when the reader finds out he knew Jim was free all along.  This frustrated me at first because I got the sense that this whole journey was just a product of Tom's scheme.  This may be true, but so many issues were addressed on the journey down the river.  That is why I was impressed with this novel.  Slavery is just one of the moral issues included.  It also leaves the reader questioning a lot, such as: the main focus of the novel, how much did Huck actually learn and grow on his journey, etc. one last side note: Huck never truly stood up for himself publicy, especially with Tom which caused disappointment, but he did in fact consistently stand against the true antagonist: a corupt society. 

Wildcard Number 2-RACISM

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I will use this wild card section to get out a few of my thoughts on racism, which I felt was appropriate after reading a few of the selections.  Anyone could write an extensive paper on this topic as there are many avenues to it, but I will just stick to the few ideas that come to mind as I write this blog.  First of all, I want to shine a light on Martin Luther King.  I went to a talk where one of his daughters spoke and I was really moved. I obviously learned about him in school, but i never got to know him on the level that I did after I attended the speech.  He did so much for this country and not just for the blacks.  Most just think of him as a civil rights leader, which was his main role, but his accomplishments are much more extensive.  If you listen to his speech past the " I have a dream" part he has so many more goals and aspirations for our country.  His use of nonviolence to change is a mark of a true hero.  Martin Luther King Jr was concerned for everyone's welfare.  If it was not for him I believe this country would not be what it is today and whites would be suffering as well. He lifted so much hatred out of the whites hearts.  Now with that said, I would like to talk about some of the racial issues of today.  Now there is definitely still some discrimination against blacks because certain beliefs were passed down in certain white families.  But, I do not agree that still whites are immediately thought of as the most racist in our society.  Also, many of the whites today do not even have ancestors who owned slaves as they came from other countries such as Ireland or Italy.  Those who fall in this category have ancestors who suffered some of the very same harsh treatment just because they came from a certain area.  All racism is disgusting and should be considered just as important as the rest because if not, is that not discrimination in itself?   Our generation needs to put an end to this madness and we can only do this by teaching our future kids the right way of thinking and to stop holding grudges on happenings from years ago and hopefully it can be filtered out! 

Second Portfolio

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This is the second portfolio for my American Literature class at Seton Hill University.  There are many links that take you to my blogs on specific readings assigned for this portion of the class. 

 

Coverage- Here are all of the links to the blogs that discuss my responses to the assigned readings.
How to Read Literature Like A Professor- Foster chapters 13-15
     http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/09/history_repeats_itself_extreme.html

How to Read Literature Like A Professor- Foster Chapters 18, 19, 20
    http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/people_will_come_around_in_the.html

How to Read Literature Like A Professor-Foster Interlude, Chapters 21 and 22
   http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/shapes_of_a_character_open_up.html

Thoreau, Walden-Chapters 2 and 4
    http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/09/follow_your_own_path.html

Thoreau, Walden-Chapters 13 and 18
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/09/direct_your_eye_inward.html

The Raven-Poe
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/it_shall_be_lifter_nevermore.html

Various other poems by Poe
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/joy_is_like_a_tattered_curtain.html

Various Emily Dickinson Poems
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/some_unanswered_questions.html

Various Emily Dickinson Poems cont.
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/the_pain_of_the_crucifix.html

Aiken, Uncle Tom's Cabin
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/the_mutualistic_relationship_b.html

Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn-Up to Chapter 10
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/twains_irony_and_my_sympathy.html

Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Chapters 11-35
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/huck_is_off_to_hell.html

Smith, Intro to AHF
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/the_slaves_of_society.html
 

Depth-The following blogs I felt I had gone into depth with and could have easily sparked a discussion.

How to Read Literature Like A Professor- Foster chapters 13-15
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/09/history_repeats_itself_extreme.html

How to Read Literature Like A Professor-Foster Interlude, Chapters 21 and 22
   http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/shapes_of_a_character_open_up.html

Thoreau, Walden-Chapters 13 and 18
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/09/direct_your_eye_inward.html

The Raven-Poe
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/it_shall_be_lifter_nevermore.html

Various other poems by Poe
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/joy_is_like_a_tattered_curtain.html

Various Emily Dickinson Poems
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/some_unanswered_questions.htmlAiken,

Uncle Tom's Cabin
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/the_mutualistic_relationship_b.html

Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn-Up to Chapter 10
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/twains_irony_and_my_sympathy.html

Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Chapters 11-35
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/huck_is_off_to_hell.html

Smith, Intro to AHF
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/the_slaves_of_society.html
 

Interaction-These are the comments I left on my Peers Blogs

Jamie Grace-Foster Ch. 13-15
     http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JamieGrace/2009/09/are_we_going_to_disappear.html

Kayla Lesko- Foster Chapters 21 and 22
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/KaylaLesko/2009/10/your_scar_is_showing.html

Jessica Pierce-Thoreau Chapters 2 and 4
   http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaPierce/2009/09/such_beautiful_words.html

Jessica Pierce-Various Poe Poems
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaPierce/2009/10/tales_of_dreams_and_money.html

Jeremy Barrick-Emily Dickinson
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JeremyBarrick/2009/10/el_266_emily_dickinson-the_gar.html

Heather Mourick-Emily Dickinson
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/HeatherMourick/2009/10/a_little_simplicity_never_hurt.html

Katie Lantz-Uncle Tom's Cabin
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/KatieLantz/2009/10/uncle_toms_cabin_ii.html

Katie Lantz-Huckleberry Finn (Up to Chapter 10)
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/KatieLantz/2009/10/tom_sawyer_holden_caulfield.html

Jessica Pierce-Huckleberry Finn (Up to Chapter 10)
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaPierce/2009/10/bad_luck_and_untraditional_sym.html

Jeremy Barrick-Huckleberry Finn (11-35)
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JeremyBarrick/2009/10/el_266_ahf_ch_11-35_jim_aint_g.html


Discussion-
These are the few blogs that I felt sparked a discussion, either on the website or in class, especially when we broke into groups.

How to Read Literature Like A Professor- Foster chapters 13-15
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/09/history_repeats_itself_extreme.html

How to Read Literature Like A Professor-Foster Interlude, Chapters 21 and 22
   http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/shapes_of_a_character_open_up.html

Thoreau, Walden-Chapters 2 and 4
    http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/09/follow_your_own_path.html

Thoreau, Walden-Chapters 13 and 18
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/09/direct_your_eye_inward.html

The Raven-Poe
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/it_shall_be_lifter_nevermore.html

Various Emily Dickinson Poems
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/some_unanswered_questions.html

Various Emily Dickinson Poems cont.
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/the_pain_of_the_crucifix.html

Aiken, Uncle Tom's Cabin
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/the_mutualistic_relationship_b.html

Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Chapters 11-35
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/huck_is_off_to_hell.html 

 

Timeliness-
All of my entries were written before the deadline, but these were the few (because of the time they were written) peers responded to.

How to Read Literature Like A Professor- Foster chapters 13-15
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/09/history_repeats_itself_extreme.html

Thoreau, Walden-Chapters 2 and 4
    http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/09/follow_your_own_path.htm

Thoreau, Walden-Chapters 13 and 18
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/09/direct_your_eye_inward.html

The Raven-Poe
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/it_shall_be_lifter_nevermore.html

Various other poems by Poe
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/joy_is_like_a_tattered_curtain.html

Various Emily Dickinson Poems
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/some_unanswered_questions.html

Various Emily Dickinson Poems cont.
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/the_pain_of_the_crucifix.html

Aiken, Uncle Tom's Cabin
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/the_mutualistic_relationship_b.html

Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn - Chapters 11-35
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/huck_is_off_to_hell.html 

Xenoblogging-
The following entries are responses to my peer's blogs that I felt gave a little bit of insight to the owner of the original entry.

Jamie Grace-Foster Ch. 13-15
     http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JamieGrace/2009/09/are_we_going_to_disappear.html

Jessica Pierce-Thoreau Chapters 2 and 4
   http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaPierce/2009/09/such_beautiful_words.html

Jessica Pierce-Various Poe Poems
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaPierce/2009/10/tales_of_dreams_and_money.htm

Heather Mourick-Emily Dickinson
 http://blogs.setonhill.edu/HeatherMourick/2009/10/a_little_simplicity_never_hurt.htm

Katie Lantz-Uncle Tom's Cabin
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/KatieLantz/2009/10/uncle_toms_cabin_ii.htm

Jessica Pierce-Huckleberry Finn (Up to Chapter 10)
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaPierce/2009/10/bad_luck_and_untraditional_sym.html

Jeremy Barrick-Huckleberry Finn (11-35)
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JeremyBarrick/2009/10/el_266_ahf_ch_11-35_jim_aint_g.html

Katie Lantz-Huckleberry Finn (11-35)
  http://blogs.setonhill.edu/KatieLantz/2009/10/liar_liar.html



Wildcard-
Racism

http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaApitsch/2009/10/wildcard_number_2-racism.html


The Slaves of Society

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                "Bringing the Duke and the King into the story was a master stroke" (327).

There could be several reasons to support this statement, but there is one particular one that comes to my mind.  The Duke and the King prove their fraudulence over and over again through their malicious actions.  Mark Twain used them as another obstacle for Jim and Huck, but he also had another goal for these two characters.  In every passage where the Duke and the King commit a malicious act on society, Twain carefully brings the same qualities of the society out in the open for the reader.  This is shown when the society tries to trick everyone else into thinking the show is amazing instead of saving them from a waste of time and money.  Also, the picture of ignorance is painted when they do not realize the Duke and the King are not the real uncles.   These characters were one of many ways Twain established his points of views on society, which include the idea that the people are slaves to conformity and ignorance and the mob mentality.  This brings me to my other though as I was reading.  Jim is not the only one fleeing from slavery. Twain makes it clear that "Huck too is fleeing from slavery" (329). 

Huck is off to Hell

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                First of all I would like to open it up to anyone that could shed some light on the Bob and The Child of Calamity passage.  I read the footnote, but I feel as though I am missing the importance of it.  What was Twain trying to parallel by using these names? I tried to do a quick search, but all I received were summaries of the novel. 

"All right, then, I'll go to Hell"(257).

                I took interest in Huck's development during this portion of the novel.  He already has matured a great deal and his compassion is shining bright.  Even so, he is still struggling with the battle between his conscience and society.  The society that he was raised in and then ran away from is proving to be full of hypocrisy.  I took particular interest in the passage where Huck is trying to decide what to do about Jim, who has been sold at this point.  Huck feels guilty for helping Jim and begins to pray for forgiveness, but soon realizes that his heart is not in it so he stops.  Huck assumes he stops praying because of his wickedness, which society always made him feel was the reason for his actions.  The actual moral action, freeing Jim, is causing this guilt.  His whole life society made him feel that his decisions were due to his rebellious nature, so why would this be any different? Well, this is very different! When Huck decides to go to Hell, he is actually going towards somewhere that could not be any farther from Hell.  Huck is about to undergo his first adult adventure and it will only help him grow even more and travel down his own river away from an immoral society.     

The Mutualism Between Light and Dark

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I took interest in all of the passages of two characters, Topsy and Eva.  There is a saying "grew like topsy" which means enormous growth, so right off the bat I knew Topsy would undergo some sort of change.  Eva, whose full name is Evangeline, had such radiance circling around her.  In the beginning Eva served as the character of beauty, innocence, and strength.  She was the inspiration for all who came into contact with her and was the 'treasures of yearning hearts." Topsy, in the beginning, served as the character of wickedness ("limb of satan") and she was very lost ("Don't think nobody made me").  She felt as she had "never been born" and this due to her feeling that "no one loves" her.  She was the torture or "plague".  I started to think of Pearl when I got to know these two characters and I saw her in both.  Pearl was both the torture and the treasure.  The torture needed the treasure and vice versa.  Topsy eventually saw the light and grew into a loving treasure herself.  I think these two characters represented the extreme dark and light that lingers in all of us. Sometimes the dark needs to make itself known so the light can shine that much brighter when it makes its way to the surface. 

Shapes of a Character Open Up Many Doors

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"All character's who are as famous for their shape as for their behavior" (193)

Foster makes a point that in real life a physical deformity is just that and nothing more but in literature this is not the case.  I do agree that almost every main character of a movie or a novel has some sort of physical attribute that teams up with their mental characteristics to make them stand out from the rest.  And most often more times and not this physical attribute holds a lot of symbolic meaning to enhance the story's plot.  I do agree that in real life the physical deformity or let's just say physical difference usually does not hold a symbolic meaning, but it definitely adds to the person's story,  "we don't get through life without being marked by the experience" (198).  These "markings" , both physical and mental, are what gives each individual depth and individuality.  The physical ones jump out first and we often become much more interested at an earlier time with someone's life story if a physical deformity jumps out at us.  Authors know this, which is why it has become a popular tool in literature.    

Twain's Irony and My sympathy

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"There was a cross in the left boot-heel made with big nails, to keep off the devil" (172). "Oh let a poor Devil alone!" (181). 

            I took interest in the irony of the first quote.  The tracks with the cross imprint were left from Huck's father.  This is a man who has so much hatred towards the world and his own son.  This is proven in the passages following this statement.  His actions do not seem to come from a man who would wear a cross on his boot to keep the evil spirit away.  But, then Mark Twain includes a passage where Huck's father is having a series of allusions, one where he actually tells the "tramps" to stay away him and he refers to himself as a devil.  I thought it was also interesting how "the devil" was used in the first quote but "a devil" was chosen for the second when referencing the father. 

"You wants to keep 'way fum de water as much as you kin.." (173). 

            I thought this was another ironic statement Mark Twain included.  I am only ten chapters in and Huck Finn has hardly been away from water, but so far water has been pretty positive for Huck.  It was his means to freedom from his destructive father. 

 

"Yes-en I's rich now, come to look at it. I owns myself, en I's wuth eight hund'd dollars" (195). 

This statement stood out to me because I felt mixed emotions about it.  I felt joy for Jim because he was free now and it woke me up how freedom is worth all the riches in the world.  We do not even have to think twice about that these days.  A free man is a wealthy man.  The latter part of the quote made me feel sorrow for Jim.  He allows someone else to measure his worth of eight hundred dollars; little does he know a life of a human is worth much more, one could say it is priceless.  Back then, slaves were not looked at as human but as property. 

The pain of the Crucifix

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XIII. Renunciation

            "So faces on two decks look back, Bound to opposing lands"

            Dickenson makes several references to the Lord and the His crucifix.  The quote above gives the image that the two lovers are being torn apart.  The narrator is hurting deeply over this.  Her pain is painted vividly when compared to a crucifix, especially when the name of the Lord is mentioned nearby. 

IV.

            "Why, I will lend until just then, But not an hour more!"

            Human can never truly own what is bounded to Earth, which is anything in nature.  It is forever a part of the Earth.  We are only borrowing it while we reside on Earth.  I do not think we realize this and feel as if we can treat the Earth's possessions the same way as we treat some of our man made "things" in our home.  This could lead to disaster in the future. 

Some Unanswered Questions

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VIII.

            I did not choose a particular quote.  I just tried to grasp the overall idea.  I thought maybe she realized her mortality when it was thrown in her face standing so close to the immortality of nature.  She felt as if she could speak it to anything or anyone which is a natural reaction in the face of death. 

 

VI.

            "Then draw my little letter forth and softly pick the lock."

            I thought maybe the narrator was starting to step slowly towards love as before she locked this up. But the passage following this one lost me. "Then, glancing narrow at the wall, And narrow at the floor, For firm conviction of a mouse Not exorcised before,".  The final passage "Peruse how infinite I am To--no one that you know! And sigh for lack of Heaven, but not The Heaven the creeds bestow" was thought to be trying to get across that no one really knows her and because of this she lack a Heaven on Earth.  I am not sure about the passage in between so I do not have a firm grip in this poem. 

Joy Is Like a Tattered Curtain

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            "Which thro' some tatter'd curtain pries Into the darkness of a room, Is by (the very source of gloom) The motes, and dust, and flies, On which it trembles and lies Like joy upon sorrow!"  

            The way I interpreted this particular quote which is a part of this poem was Poe making a direct comparison to a tattered curtain to joy.  He creates the image of a tattered curtain lying on top of flies and dust and motes, just like joy lies upon sorrow.  This gave me such insight on one way the narrator and even Poe felt about the feeling of joy.  Not only is a tattered curtain quite unattractive, it is quite worn and torn.  Also allowing the sorrow to lie beneath the joy, which is compared to a tattered curtain, it gives the reader the image that sorrow always peeks up and escapes from underneath and rises above joy as the dust and flies could easily accomplish through the holes in the curtain.    

            "Over waterfalls, (Silent waterfalls!)". 

            This could represent how disconnected the narrator felt either to life or to this character mentioned, Isabel.  If one only sees a waterfall and cannot hear the sound, the beauty is lost.   The connection with the waterfall is lost. 

It Shall Be Lifter Nevermore!

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            Poe supplies a lot of evidence that the narrator had experienced a great loss of love due to death: "whom the angels name Lenore-Nameless here for evermore.", "She shall press, oh, nevermore!", "memories of Lenore", "Lost Lenore" , and so on. Even if Poe did not spell this out for the reader, his amazing and strong images of loneliness would lead many readers to this conclusion.  Many passages screamed loneliness. 

            Once Poe created the image of the narrator extremely well, he brought the raven in to the picture, the only other named character (besides late Lenore).  The narrator refers to everyone else in the world as mere "visitors" and "nothing more".  Poe brightens his image of loneliness when he allows such a dark, "grave", "stern", and "lonely" raven to send the narrator's "sad fancy into smiling" (2).  All the beauties this world has to offer had no chance of such success.  At first I thought the bird could bring hope to the narrator's life.  I thought Poe, by creating such parallels in the description of the bird and the narrator , would use this to somehow alleviate some of the loneliness.  But as the poem progressed I was not so sure of this anymore.  At first the narrator asks the bird if he can "forget this lost Lenore!" (3). The bird replies "nevermore".  Not being able to forget someone taken out of this context isn't always negative, but when the narrator begins to plead to "clasp" Lenore or keep her, the raven replies "nevermore".  When one is unable to forget a person who is unable to be kept, pain and panic set in.  The only aspect left to hold onto is the pain, which is reinforced when the narrator states "Leave my loneliness unbroken!" (4). He does not want anyone or anything jeopardizing the one connection with this late love, even if it is the single culprit causing his downfall.  Poe does not have the bird fly away, but he does not do this to un-break the narrator's loneliness, which would have a slightly lighter/happier meaning.  I believe it represents something much darker.  Everyone and everything seemed to leave, according to the narrator, but the first time he is proven wrong and something refuses to leave, it ends up representing his trapped soul.  Just like the raven, it "shall be lifted-nevermore!"  Now I know I took everyone reading this on a journey called my interpretation of plot summary, but I wanted to get some of my reactions down on this blog and maybe receive some feedback. 

People Will Come Around in Their Own Time

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            "The thing about baptism is, you have to be ready to receive it" (157).

 

            This is so true for both the religious and the literature worlds.  If one is forced into a religion prematurely, the Catholic faith particularly, the whole process will be meaningless.  The stage of baptism and being immersed will hold as much meaning as dunking the head under water for the purpose of rinsing shampoo.  Faith is very personal and must be found when the time is right for the individual.  Characters go through changes, which many times lead to some sort of growth or renewal period and often then lead to a "rebirth".  This too is quite personal.  Even in real life people change in their own time.  If not, the change is usually not permanent.