December 2009 Archives

Blog Portfolio 4!

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Coverage: This is a compilation of all the entries I've done this semester.

Can You Use That in a Sentence..?
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/can_you_use_that_in_a_sentence.html
- In this entry, I make an assertion about assertions. In other words, I describe how important assertions are to writing a decent thesis statement. (Roberts Ch. 7)

Animal Cruelty at its Finest:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/animal_cruelty_at_its_finest.html
- In this entry, I examine the connection between Anton Chekhov's "The Bear" and the emergent social/ sexual revolution in Russia at the time the play was written.

The Ultimate Horror (Love) Story:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/the_ultimate_horror_love_story.html
- I debate whether the speaker in Robert Browning's "Porphyria's Lover" committed murder out of love for his dying girlfriend or out of hate for her unfaithfulness.

Pro-nunt-see-ay-shun:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/pro-nunt-see-ay-shun.html
- Here, I write a letter to Roberts concerning chapter 13, a chapter about Prosody. I discuss how not many people know the difference between spelling and pronunciation, and consider how I can fix this in my future teaching career.

Where I've Been:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/where_ive_been.html
- I examine the decline of the English major in the United States collegiate system.

Ghosts Among Us:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/ghosts_among_us.html
- I compare the Ghost of Christmas Past in A Christmas Carol to Jesus Christ.

Activating Prior Knowledge:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/12/activating_prior_knowledge.html
- This is a blog entry that concerns Roberts chapters 10 and 16


Timeliness: These are the entries that were submitted on time.

Can You Use That in a Sentence..?
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/can_you_use_that_in_a_sentence.html

Animal Cruelty at its Finest:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/animal_cruelty_at_its_finest.html

The Ultimate Horror (Love) Story:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/the_ultimate_horror_love_story.html

Pro-nunt-see-ay-shun:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/pro-nunt-see-ay-shun.html

Where I've Been:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/where_ive_been.html

Ghosts Among Us:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/ghosts_among_us.html

Activating Prior Knowledge:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/12/activating_prior_knowledge.html


Depth: These are the entries that I put a little extra effort into.

Animal Cruelty at its Finest:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/animal_cruelty_at_its_finest.html

The Ultimate Horror (Love) Story:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/the_ultimate_horror_love_story.html

Where I've Been:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/where_ive_been.html

Ghosts Among Us:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/ghosts_among_us.html

Activating Prior Knowledge:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/12/activating_prior_knowledge.html


Interaction: These are occurrences during which I contributed to a classmate's blog.

Brooke Kuehn's "Why So Drab?"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/BrookeKuehn/2009/11/why_so_drab.html
- Brooke wrote a fantastic blog concerning Roberts' claim that we should not analyze certain texts. This blog also developed into a discussion between Brooke, Dr. Jerz and myself.

Karyssa Blair's "X Marks the Spot... Sometimes"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/KaryssaBlair/2009/11/x_marks_the_spot_sometimes.html
- Karyssa's blog detailed the importance of reader interpretation when it comes to analyzing a text. I replied by adding details to her viewpoint.

Brooke Kuehn's "Poor Toby"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/BrookeKuehn/2009/11/poor_toby.html
- Since I blogged about the same topic, I added the knowledge I'd gained about Chekhov's "The Bear" to Brooke's blog, leaving a rather long comment.

Josie Rush's "More From the Moors"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JosieRush/2009/11/more_from_the_moors.html
- I was the first one to comment on Josie's blog.

Aja Hannah's "This Sick Strange Darkness"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/AjaHannah/2009/11/this_sick_strange_darkness.html
- Aja asked for enlightenment, so I gave her ideas about Browning's "Porphyria's Lover" that were able to spur discussion.

Aja Hannah's "One Thing I Can Tell You"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/AjaHannah/2009/11/one_thing_i_can_tell_you.html
- I contributed to a lengthy discussion on Aja's blog.

Carissa Altizer's "Sorry, no convenient restrooms, you have to pee in the woods"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/CarissaAltizer/2009/11/sorry_no_convenient_restrooms.html
- Carissa made an assertion that teaching can be used as a backup plan because of the decline of the English major, but I offered an opposing viewpoint and spurred discussion.

Gladys Mares' "The Ghost of Economic Hardship"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/GladysMares/2009/11/the_ghost_of_economic_hardship.html
- I contributed to a discussion on Gladys' blog.

Josie Rush's "Let's Do the Time Warp Again"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JosieRush/2009/11/lets_do_the_time_warp_again.html
- I added to a discussion on Josie's blog.


Discussion: These are my blogs that spurred discussion among my classmates.

Can You Use That in a Sentence..?
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/can_you_use_that_in_a_sentence.html

Animal Cruelty at its Finest:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/animal_cruelty_at_its_finest.html


The Ultimate Horror (Love) Story:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/the_ultimate_horror_love_story.html

Pro-nunt-see-ay-shun:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/pro-nunt-see-ay-shun.html

Where I've Been:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/where_ive_been.html


Xenoblogging: How I contributed to the blogging community

Karyssa Blair's "X Marks the Spot... Sometimes"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/KaryssaBlair/2009/11/x_marks_the_spot_sometimes.html
- Because Karyssa and Brooke blogged about the same topic, I referenced Brooke's blog in the comment I left on Karyssa's blog.

Jessica Orlowski's "Animal Cruelty at its Finest"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/animal_cruelty_at_its_finest.html
- I mention Brooke's blog entry in my blog.

Jessica Orlowski's "Can You Use That in a Sentence..?"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/can_you_use_that_in_a_sentence.html
- I encourage my classmates to post their methods of finding thesis statements so that we can tackle that problem together.

Brooke Kuehn's "Poor Toby"
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/BrookeKuehn/2009/11/poor_toby.html
- I was the first one to comment on Brooke's blog, and spurred a long discussion as a result. I also left an extremely long comment.

ROBERT BROWNING, "PORPHYRIA'S LOVER":
http://jerz.setonhill.edu/EL237/2009/11/browning_porphyrias_lover/#comments
- For the benefit of the class, I found a link that explained the definition of "Porphyria," and left this link on the class website.

Wildcard:

Ghosts Among Us:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/JessicaOrlowski/2009/11/ghosts_among_us.html
- I believe that I put a lot of thought into this blog entry. This could provide a potential thesis statement concerning how the three ghosts in A Christmas Story relate to the various persons of the Holy Trinity.

Activating Prior Knowledge

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"Cultural of Universal Symbols and allegories often allude to other works from our cultural heritage, such as the Bible, ancient history and literature, and works of the British and American traditions. Sometimes understanding a story may require knowledge of history and current politics." (153, Roberts).

 

In the education field, a crucial element of teaching a daily lesson plan is activating the prior knowledge of the students in order to get them more fully involved in the lesson. I suppose that this holds true with many literary works. For instance, in the poem "Cargoes 1902," (377)John Masefield uses a variety Biblical references in his poem in comparison to the state of shipments in England during the early 1900's. Without the footnotes (which Roberts graciously provided), many, including myself, would have no idea what "Ophir" (line 1) was. Also, this poem requires some knowledge of ancient and relatively modern history. Upon reading this poem the first time, I immediately researched the historical context in which this poem was written. I discovered that there was a war between Africa and England that was occurring at the time the poem was written, and this put the "mad March days" (line 12) into perspective for me.

Another work of Literature that we studied that required the activation of prior knowledge was Langston Hughes' "Theme for English B" (373). Initially, it may not have been realized that one needed prior knowledge when reading Hughes' poem, but there is plenty of prior knowledge necessary to fully understand the context in which the poem was written. "Theme for English B" is a poem that was written during a time of unstated segregation in America. If we did not know this prior bit of information, we would not fully comprehend why the speaker in the poem is "the only colored student in my class" (line 10). Also, we wouldn't understand the significance of the speaker stating "Bessie, bop or Bach" (line 24) as his musical preferences and having Bach stick out.

Clearly, activating prior knowledge about historical events or past stories is crucial for reader comprehension. How can we enforce the importance of placing a story or work into historical context? In chapter 16, Roberts states that "Some works, however, may seem to offer a special challenge because of their apparent lack of currency; that is, they seem to be so closely connected with our own contemporary ideas and assumptions that you may not readily see them in historical and cultural perspective" (235). The reason that historical events are retold for future generations is because the lessons that can be learned from these events are relevant. However, if we solely focus on the contemporary aspects of literary works, we will sometimes miss the deeper meanings that are accompanied by historical contexts.   

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Kayla Lesko on The Ultimate Horror (Love) Story: Never thought about it that wa
Aja Hannah on Activating Prior Knowledge: For "Cargoes" it is also impor
Karyssa Blair on Where I've Been: I don't think that's what he w
Aja Hannah on Ghosts Among Us: I didn't even think of this co
JessicaOrlowski on Where I've Been: I've never read the Time Machi
JessicaOrlowski on Can You Use That In a Sentence..?: Well, after I choose the theme
Karyssa Blair on Where I've Been: It's scary, indeed. I love tec
Karyssa Blair on Can You Use That In a Sentence..?: I usually follow the same proc
JessicaOrlowski on Where I've Been: I don't think we should give u
Melissa Schwenk on Where I've Been: When I was reading the article