February 10, 2004

Blogging Portfolio I

This semester my weblog has undergone a transformation from a general link/funny story repository to a more academic study of aesthetics. However, this has posed several issues that I hadn't considered before, such as maintaining my readership and examining what exactly I post about.

This semester my weblog has undergone a transformation from a general link/funny story repository to a more academic study of aesthetics. However, this has posed several issues that I hadn't considered before, such as maintaining my readership and examining what exactly I post about.

So far this semester I feel like my blogging has been more intelligent. Not only am I regularly examining works of literature, but I am also examining issues that I feel strongly about, such as violence against women and libraries. I'm not just writing about current event stories and what amusing thing happened to me that day (although I often report what I ate at meals).

However, my greatest challenge so far this semester has been pleasing my audience. I feel that most of the readers that I acquired last semester probably don't care about the Pygmalion legend or my other homework entries. So, I've been trying to please both audiences, which leads to a really strange mix of entries, like me writing about little people dating shows on Fox the same week I posted extensively on libraries. I'm not quite certain how I will bridge this problem, because I feel like I've been doing an inadequate job of making a thematically cohesive weblog of late.

My weblog also has a clear example of what happens when you put something written off-line online. I wrote an entry on "Cathedral" as a response paper. Then, I felt as if I ought to post it online. However, it lacks the same reader accessabilty as other posts on the same topic. It doesn't have links, and frankly, just looks like I slapped a paper on my blog. At least I used short paragraph style, or else it would look completely out of place. Through that experience, I learned even more that online writing is not off-line writing.

I also think that this semester blogging has become a little bit different for me. I think I am beginning to get over the joy of having a new toy (even though blogging wasn't especially new to me). I used to be addicted to my instant community, reading the new additions to the New Media Journalism site and my classmates' blogs. Now, I'm less concerned with that -- I really only read outstanding blogs from last semester and those from my actual class.

I don't comment much anymore, either, and I think I will try to comment on my classmate's blogs more in the future. Truth be told, it's harder to comment on academic subjects because it takes actual thought. It takes enough thought for me to post on my own blog. However, how can I expect anyone to comment on my blog if I don't on theirs? Even if my comments aren't groundbreaking or especially thought-provoking, I need to put forth more effort on that front.

Overall, keeping a weblog has been more challenging this semester, but I like the change. It's nice to have a forum to read other student's thoughts on coursework -- it makes it more interesting. However, I need to work more to my own weblog's theme more cohesive.

Posted by Julie Young at February 10, 2004 10:46 PM
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