« Liberty to "feel" outside one's comfort zone | Main | Silent Madness Inside the Yellow Wallpaper »

The Syn of forgetfulness

I hate to admit it, but the word synecdoche always stumps me. Everytime I see it I say to myself "I know this word." I can even pronounce it correctly, but its meaning slips my mind. So if you're like me I will refresh your memory like I had to refresh mine.

It is derived from the Greek word for "to take up together." It is a figure of thought in which the term for part of something is used to represent the whole. (Hamilton 41)

Examples: calling someone "big mouth" or "the brain," The saying "all hands on deck" refering to the sailors

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://blogs.setonhill.edu/mt/mt-tb.cgi/19068

Comments (7)

Good job explaining a tricky but common term. When you get the chance, please add links from these pages back to the course page. For instance, this page should include a link back to

http://jerz.setonhill.edu/EL312/2009/01/term1/

Ellen Einsporn:

Another example of synecdoche is the Catholic prayer called "Our Father." One of the lines ("Give us this day our daily bread") references "bread" to mean food/nourishment in general. Thus, a part represents a whole.

For me there were about five or six words in a row in one sentence that I couldn't remember their meaning and this was one of them. I think with all of our blogs combined we defined all the literary terms in that sentence or two that we all know we should know by now but can never remember.

Erica Gearhart:

I really like your examples, Mara and Ellen. They are really helpful. I think it's really funny that you bring up the pronounciation of the term because in high school, I had a teacher who completely mangled the term all of the time. She said sin-eck-doch (or the pronunciation that it would seem to have). Most of my class knew the proper way to say it, but other than this tiny flaw, she was a great teacher.

Erica Gearhart:

I really like your examples, Mara and Ellen. They are really helpful. I think it's really funny that you bring up the pronounciation of the term because in high school, I had a teacher who completely mangled the term all of the time. She said sin-eck-doch (or the pronunciation that it would seem to have). Most of my class knew the proper way to say it, but other than this tiny flaw, she was a great teacher.

Michelle Tantlinger:

I wanted to leave a comment solely because I loved your title! Clever. But I understand what it's like to see a word, to know it but you can't articulate what it means. It's frustrating but I think eventually you do learn the word mostly through repetition!

James Lohr:

This was one of the terms I had to look up as well. It's not often anymore in literature that I come across words that I have never seen or those I can figure out from the context clues.

Post a comment

(If you haven't left a comment here before, you may need to be approved by the site owner before your comment will appear. Until then, it won't appear on the entry. Thanks for waiting.)

About

This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on January 27, 2009 3:48 PM.

The previous post in this blog was Liberty to "feel" outside one's comfort zone.

The next post in this blog is Silent Madness Inside the Yellow Wallpaper.

Many more can be found on the main index page or by looking through the archives.