October 26, 2004

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Ending)

When reading the ending of the book, I found myself constantly expecting something more drastic to happen that what I felt actually did. I was almost let down to find out Huck and Tom went to so much trouble to free Jim, and Jim was actually a free slave anyways. I was so mad and almost put myself in the situation and I was really mad at Tom for doing that particular aspect. I was so furious because I could in a way see one of my friends doing that to me. I know that Tom was seeking to make the freeing and escape of Jim to be like the novels that he read and the ultimate adventure, but being in Huck and Jim's position it was a real dirty trick to play.

I also found in the ending of the novel that I was also disappointed that the novel seems to almost start directly from the beginning. I state this because of Huck's last sentences like that he was going to be tried to made civilized again and he didn't like that fact. I found that I was telling myself well here it goes all over again and the story of the adventures will start over again. However, the adventures might not be the same but it is almost like a continuous cycle beginning again.

In reading the book, I really didn't mind the story as a whole. I just felt that I was expecting more in terms of the ending of the book. I really do not know what I was expecting. I believe I expected some great marvel because of the surprising adventures that Huck ventured into. I was just expecting more of a surprise and in a way I was overshooting my expectations. I guess the ending was just a major let down for me.

Posted by MelissaHagg at October 26, 2004 2:15 PM
Comments

Melissa,

I would be happy to elaborate on Jim being a mentor to Huck. Yes, it can be stretched to the point where Jim is a father figure to Huck, but not as much. You can mix both thoughts of how Huck feels towards Jim. Huck at times looks up to Jim, because he is older and has a family of his own. He is considerate towards him as well. However, it would stick with my original thought he is more of a mentor than a father figure, because Huck was thinking of turning Jim in, and if he was a father figure, then it wouldn't have even crossed his mind. He even let Jim go along with Tom's plans, and if Huck cared, he would have stopped Tom. So, I don't think Jim is really a father figure. That's just my opinion. Hope it helps.

-Nabila :)

Posted by: NabilaUddin at November 1, 2004 1:51 PM

Melissa,

Hmm...I thought the ending was alright for me. I know it could have been better, but at least everyone was happy. Sometimes, I get bothered by endings of stories or movies. I would say to myself, "That's it?, I thought it was going to get better, but it just ended." I usually get upset if I expect more out of the movie or book, and it just abruptly ended. However, I was satisfied the ending of Huck Finn.

-Nabila

Posted by: NabilaUddin at November 1, 2004 5:49 PM

Nabila,

Thanks for giving me two wonderful comments to work on!! I am glad to see that you do not believe that Jim was a father figure for Huck. I had mixed feelings on that as well. He was there as an authority figure for Huck but at the same time there were areas in the story that I would question this presumption. So, I believe that I am mixed on my opinions because of the differing text. I would fairly like to state that in certain areas of the story Huck finds Jim as a mentor and in certain areas he finds him as a father figure.

In response to my feelings on the ending in comparison to yours, I believe that you were exactly right when you said that at least everybody ended up happy. I am for happy ever after so I can definitely see your point in this area. However, I just couldn't help but feel like I was expected more and more!!! I think I over stepped my expectations!! Thanks though for the comments and if you would like to add further on these topics, I wouldn't mind :)

Melissa

Posted by: Melissa Hagg at November 3, 2004 9:34 AM

Melissa,

I am glad that you think that same way that I do about Jim being a mentor and a father figure in certain parts of the story. I couldn't decide in just picking one description for Jim, because he tends to be both.

-Nabila

Posted by: NabilaUddin at November 3, 2004 2:38 PM

I think the ending is appropiate for Huck comes a complete circle in his life, and any other ending would have made it an unrealistic childs book.

Posted by: Mateo at November 22, 2004 9:17 PM

the ending of this book is very important the way it is. you see, tom, and the others represent a fairytale land. huck has to escape this fairytale and enter civilization. he accomplishes this when he runs away. when huck decided to go along with tom's plan at the end of the story, i believe Twain was prooving a valid point, "A person can not be civilized in such a short period of time. once the fairytale comes back to huck, he falls in. This is why huck was unable to say, "No Tom, were getting jim out my way."

Posted by: mike at November 24, 2004 12:58 PM

I am actually writing a paper on the ending of Huckleberry Finn and I feel that the ending is necessary to continue the satirical quality of the story. Twain seems to be using Tom as a way to make fun of romanticism, and by having Huck remain under "Tom's romantic wing" it could be shining a negative light on romanticism or perhaps the South. Also, about Jim being free the whole time, perhaps this shows how when Twain finished writing the book, during the reconstruction period, even though slaves were supposed to be free, this was not really the case. Basically i think Twain is trying to create an accurate view of society at that time, so I was not dissapointed in reading the ending.

Posted by: Catherine at December 5, 2004 6:06 PM

The ending of Huck Finn was disappointing to one who does not wish to dissect the actual reasoning behind it.. All the ideas that have been presented thus far are debatable yet still well thought out..I have yet to develope my opinion . I believe that the ending could have been necessary to represent Huck's adolescence. Although through out the book it may seem as though he loves just laying around all day and not having to listen to authority (even though he presumes to be one of the only people with morals besides a few others) that he has not reached the age that he is ready to let society go. As though Twain is teaching yet another lesson about the developing of oneself and that you cannot simply cut off all ties with society ,though it may be cruel, it is necessary for human survival to be exposed to such dangers...people indulge in danger.

Like I said i have not yet developed a certain opinion ...I really have enjoyed reading all the posts and would like to read more.

Posted by: Kyra at December 6, 2004 6:24 PM

"Melissa,

I would be happy to elaborate on Jim being a mentor to Huck. Yes, it can be stretched to the point where Jim is a father figure to Huck, but not as much. You can mix both thoughts of how Huck feels towards Jim. Huck at times looks up to Jim, because he is older and has a family of his own. He is considerate towards him as well. However, it would stick with my original thought he is more of a mentor than a father figure, because Huck was thinking of turning Jim in, and if he was a father figure, then it wouldn't have even crossed his mind. He even let Jim go along with Tom's plans, and if Huck cared, he would have stopped Tom. So, I don't think Jim is really a father figure. That's just my opinion. Hope it helps.

-Nabila :)"

I came across this site whilst searching for things for my research paper on Huck Finn. I, like Melissa, found the ending extremely disappointing. However, on the subject of Jim as a father figure to Huck (which is what my paper is on)...perhaps it was on an unconscious level? We don't always know who the people are that are such figures. Huck especially would have no reason to know...he has no father figure before to base it on.

Just a few thoughts I had.

<3 Megami

Posted by: Megami at March 8, 2005 6:08 PM

The final eleven or so chapters of Huck Finn are polarizing aren't they? My opinion is that, while relatively dissappointing (you couldn't do better than that Samuel??), we're silly to think that the great Mark Twain fumbled the ending or even gave up on the story. But, what were his motives? In letting Huck clumisly fall back in line with Tom's ridiculous plots, Twain is trying to illustrate how it doesn't take a genius to recognize Jim's virtous character enough to help him. Huck is a normal kid, capable of being both righteous and foolish simultaneously. Do we really expect him to stand up to Tom?? In this way, Twain expertly avoids an ending that doesn't warrant a debate, that is to say, one that was expected and, arguably, set-up. We may think in final paragraphs that Huck doesn't change, again, it's debatable. But in reality, does it matter if Huck has learned an incredible life lesson, as long as the reader feels like he should have? Twain's point, an argument for the equality of races, is forwarded more potently by appearing as though it was lost on the characters.

Posted by: Scott at April 10, 2005 9:26 PM

The ending of Huckleberry Finn has great importance. Samuel Clemens uses the ending of the story as a strong device to criticize the society he existed in during the creation of Huckleberry Finn. Clemens completed Adventures of Huckleberry Finn during the Reconstruction period; a period in which people hoped to make peace, restore order, and rebuild after the destruction of the Civil War. While the idea seemed quite fantastic, it definately did not materialize before the completion of Clemens's novel. Clemens uses Tom's great "evasion" as a symbol of the romantic ideas present during the Reconstruction.
The statement "Tom Sawyer had gone and took all that trouble and bother to set a free nigger free" adds more significance to the symbol. Huckleberry and Tom put so much time and effort into a cause lost from the start-a parallel to the futile attempt of a "reconstruction." Furthermore, the use of the word "nigger" adds insult to injury. The use of the word displays the lingering of racism, which even Huckleberry-who tried to help a runaway slave-cannot overcome.
So the ending cannot be described as a "major let down," not in the slightest. Clemens's ending had a purpose to the very last sentences: "I reckon I got to light out for the Territory ahead of the rest, because Aunt Sally she's going to adopt me an sivilize me and I can't stand it. I been there before." Yes, the novel seems to end where it began, and no wonderful fairytale results paint the pages, but what grand results came of the Reconstruction and the "end" of slavery and racism in Clemens's time?

Posted by: Carley at July 10, 2005 10:03 PM

Yeah...i gotta do a paidaia on this in english tomarrow...and i didntreally read the book and it really didnt interest me at all

but the comments helped me think of something to say tomarrow

thanks

Posted by: Mark at February 28, 2006 9:39 PM

I wasn't able to finish the ending of the book, or even finish the ending of the movie even though I heard they ended completly different. If anyone could let me know how it goes on either/or both of the endings, that'd be appriciated!

I got to as far as when Huck and Jim met the duke and they hid the money they inherited.

Posted by: Anna at April 3, 2006 8:18 PM

stacey margolis wrote a good criticism that I think accurately sums up how the ending is positive.

A guy named Leo Marx sums up many points on why its a bad ending.

if your looking for more opinions your reading the right book, Huck Finn has been a classic in academia for a long time, too long in some views.

@ anna - try sparknotes? or "gasp" reading for an hour or two.

Posted by: D Brown at June 6, 2007 6:08 PM

One of the biggest clues that Twain interpreted Jim as a father figure for Huck, is the fact that he shows up mere pages after Huck's birth father is out of the picture. This is a common literary tactic- when one character leaves, another, similar in either methods or purpose, fills their shoes.

Posted by: D Thomas at August 18, 2007 11:22 AM

I think you're a fag. How can you sit there and say Mark Twain was a let down? I think your whole life is a let down. Mark Twain was a great great man. How dare you. I think you should go home and stay off the internet.

Posted by: Mystery Critic at January 7, 2008 3:08 PM
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