April 2009 Archives

Blatantly Obvious...And i Loved It!

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So, after reading every book in this course, I can honestly say that this was my favorite.  It kept me intrigued from the moment I began until I ended.  In fact, I was hoping that it wouldn't end, because I just wanted to keep reading.  I realize that this might sound strange.  I mean, the novel wasn't exceptionally well-known and it certainly wasn't a classic.  But, what made this novel unique from others in the course is that it didn't have any hidden undertones.  It was blatantly obvious in its depiction of how society would react to a modern day Jesus.  

From the many blogs which I have written throughout this course, I find that the main topic in which I am interested is religion, specifically, the Catholic faith.  In Resurrection Blues, there was no need to close-read to find religious characters in the novel.  Rather, the entire plot throughout the novel portrayed Ralph as a modern-day Jesus.  The "magic" which Ralph performed, his dedicated followers, and the many people who wanted to see him crucified, was purposefully and obviously paralled to Jesus' own life.

Did anyone else enjoy the obvious aspect of the novel?  Did you find this one more enjoyable to read because it was less thinking and easier to "go with the flow"?



The Media Has Made Sex the Norm

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As I read Chapter 16 in How to Read Literature Like a Professor, it affected me in a rather personal way.  Yes, sex has been an element of the media since practically the beginning of time.  However, today's novels, movies, television shows, newspapers, magazines, and internet sites take it to a whole new level.  No longer are sexual references subliminal messages, but rather they are blatantly obvious - especially to the eyes and ears of impressionable children and teenagers.  The media has enabled sex to take on new dimensions in society.  Premarital sex, contrary to actually waiting until marriage for sexual relations, is the norm.  STD's and abortion are all the more common "side effects" of the sexual epidemic scouring the world.  Sex is everywhere, and as each year passes, children become less and less naive to the inappropriate actions occurring everywhere, both in real life and in the fictional world.  Thus,  pre-teens and teens no longer view sexual relations as unnecessary for their age, but rather a fundamental part of life.  They don't understand that sex is a "big deal" that the consequences can be life-altering.

However, this mass chaos which media has managed to wreak on society shows no signs of slowing down.  We are in over our heads, and sex will never be regarded with the same dignity and respect it did many years ago.  

You Can't Fight Fate

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An obvious and heavily implied notion within the novel A Time Traveler's Wife is that fate cannot be changed.  Regardless of the fact that Henry can travel through time, he is still frustratingly unable to change any of the events which he witnesses.  Everything, both good and bad, that ever happened was supposed to happen exactly as it did, and there's not a single act which he could take to prevent it from occurring. 

Many people, not just the fictional character Henry would like to travel back into the past and rewind the past to change the outcome of certain life experiences, whether it be a car accident, the loss of a friendship, or the death of a parent.  However, The Time Traveler's Wife does not embellish this desire.  Rather, it explores the relationship between humanities' free will and the power that God has in our lives.  

Page 57 especially exemplifies this concept:

"'I was just talking about that with a self from 1992.  He said something interesting: he said that he thinks there is only free will when you are in time, in the present.  He says in the past we can only do what we did , and we can only be there if we were there.'

'But whenever I am, that's my present.  Shouldn't I be able to decide -'      

'No. Apparently not.'

'What did he say about the future?'

'Well, think.  You go to the future, you do something, you come back to the present.  Then the thing that you did is part of your past.  So that's probably inevitable, too.'

'...But then I'm no responsible for anything I do while I'm not in the present.'

He smiles. ' Thank God.'
'And everything has already happened?'

'Sure looks that way.' But he said you have to behave as though you have free will, as though you are responsible for what you do.'"


Through this quote, as well as through a multitude of other similar ones within the novel, The Time Travelers Wife sends us a often-forgotten reminder that our past experiences and choices, whether good or bad, have made us the person who we are today.  

Hopefully This Article Will Live Forever

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Angle: Helpful hints to ensure you get along with your roomate(s)
- How to act
- How to speak

People I can Interview by next week:
- Aja Hannah
- Melissa Unger
- Kaitlin Clancey
- Brittni Spillar
- Katie Lance

People I am also interested in interviewing:
- Justin Ryan (RA)
- Lauren Schoemaker (RA)
- Keisha Jimmerson

Sidebar:
- Events on campus you can partake in with your roomate(s)

Media Lab Portfolio 3

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Part A


Last Minute Delivery


  A simple miscommunication error led to unnecessarily hectic day for the Setonian Newspaper Staff at Seton Hill University. At 10:27 AM on Thursday, April 2, and urgent email had caused mass chaos throughout Seton Hill University.  Students following the instructions to "...stop by in the post office and grab a stack [of newspapers]," were in for a shock when they arrived at the appointed location to pick up the papers for delivery.  

  "I was flabbergasted when I followed the email's exact instructions, and upon arrival, none were there!" exclaimed freshman staff writer Christina Celona.  "I felt helpless, like a part of me was missing. I didn't know if they were stolen, but even if they were, I was too stunned to even remember who to report this incident to."

Similar occurrences happened to two other members of the Setonian Staff, freshman copy editors Melissa Unger and Becca Marrie. However, they took this incident with a slightly different attitude - neither was in the least bit surprised. 

  "I actually fully expect The Setonian to make mistakes due to disorganization," said Unger. "When I didn't find the newspapers at the post office, I just assumed that they had been delivered somewhere else and that I would find out about it eventually. I was not overly worried."  

  A follow-up email, sent 12:29 PM, cleared up all confusion for the staff members. The Setonian editor-in-chief, Tiffany Gilbert deeply apologized for any inconvenience caused by the false information. In the email, Gilbert stated "...I fibbed when I said the paper is at the post office.  It was actually delivered outside of the Setonian office.  Drop by sometime today if you can and help distribute."

  Within a half-hour of the apologetic email, the stack of newspapers had dwindled down after being successfully distributed to their variety of locations including the bookstore, DeChantal, Brownlee, Havey, Lowe, and Maura. 

  Celona and Marrie delivered a package together to the bookstore.

"I'm so glad we finally got this whole mess figured out," said Celona. "i hope I never have to feel that helpless feeling that I did a short time ago."

  Marrie, however, had other concerns on her mind.

  "I hope I don't drop this huge stack of papers," said Marrie.  "Though I guess it would make a good story for my media lab portfolio...'1200 Page Pick-Up.'"   



Part B

For my work on the Setonian Online, i have continued to accumulate more nutrition facts for our class project.  Hopefully, soon I will get to put these to good use. 



            

Eloquence in Invisible Man

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In his essay, Hanlon compares Ralph Waldo Emerson's "Eloquence" and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man.  I must admit, at first glance I had thought that this essay would be about the use of eloquence in Elllison's novel.  It surprised me deeply to find that "Eloquence" was actually an essay written by Emerson.  I was legitimately disturbed that the Hanlon was comparing to works, for, as it seems to me, no other reason than the fact that the authors names are incredibly similar.


However, once I got passed the seemingly shallow reasoning for writing an article such as this, I was able to actually enjoy it.  This article was a much easier read than the last assigned one and I felt like I understood the majority of it.  


"Emerson's model of spoken composition, proceeding from the recognition that every hstener is also a potential speaker ("How many orators sit mute there below!" [1903-04, 7. 63]), also captures the most charged moments of eloquence to appear in Ralph Ellison's Inuisible Man, a novel that measures the self-reliance of its nameless protagonist through his growing acumen as a public speaker."

This quote seems to relate both works by using a common concept of both, nameless speakers.  In the Invisible Man, the narrator makes himself known through his words, not through who he actually is.  


Though this was undeniably still difficult to read, made significantly more sense than the last essay.


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Eloquence in Invisible Man

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In his essay, Hanlon compares Ralph Waldo Emerson's "Eloquence" and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man.  I must admit, at first glance I had thought that this essay would be about the use of eloquence in Elllison's novel.  It surprised me deeply to find that "Eloquence" was actually an essay written by Emerson.  I was legitimately disturbed that the Hanlon was comparing to works, for, as it seems to me, no other reason than the fact that the authors names are incredibly similar.


However, once I got passed the seemingly shallow reasoning for writing an article such as this, I was able to actually enjoy it.  This article was a much easier read than the last assigned one and I felt like I understood the majority of it.  


"Emerson's model of spoken composition, proceeding from the recognition that every hstener is also a potential speaker ("How many orators sit mute there below!" [1903-04, 7. 63]), also captures the most charged moments of eloquence to appear in Ralph Ellison's Inuisible Man, a novel that measures the self-reliance of its nameless protagonist through his growing acumen as a public speaker."

This quote seems to relate both works by using a common concept of both, nameless speakers.  In the Invisible Man, the narrator makes himself known through his words, not through who he actually is.  


Though this was undeniably still difficult to read, made significantly more sense than the last essay.




Eloquence in Invisible Man

| | Comments (0)

In his essay, Hanlon compares Ralph Waldo Emerson's "Eloquence" and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man.  I must admit, at first glance I had thought that this essay would be about the use of eloquence in Elllison's novel.  It surprised me deeply to find that "Eloquence" was actually an essay written by Emerson.  I was legitimately disturbed that the Hanlon was comparing to works, for, as it seems to me, no other reason than the fact that the authors names are incredibly similar.


However, once I got passed the seemingly shallow reasoning for writing an article such as this, I was able to actually enjoy it.  This article was a much easier read than the last assigned one and I felt like I understood the majority of it.  


"Emerson's model of spoken composition, proceeding from the recognition that every hstener is also a potential speaker ("How many orators sit mute there below!" [1903-04, 7. 63]), also captures the most charged moments of eloquence to appear in Ralph Ellison's Inuisible Man, a novel that measures the self-reliance of its nameless protagonist through his growing acumen as a public speaker."

This quote seems to relate both works by using a common concept of both, nameless speakers.  In the Invisible Man, the narrator makes himself known through his words, not through who he actually is.  


Though this was undeniably still difficult to read, made significantly more sense than the last essay.




Eloquence in Invisible Man

| | Comments (0)

In his essay, Hanlon compares Ralph Waldo Emerson's "Eloquence" and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man.  I must admit, at first glance I had thought that this essay would be about the use of eloquence in Elllison's novel.  It surprised me deeply to find that "Eloquence" was actually an essay written by Emerson.  I was legitimately disturbed that the Hanlon was comparing to works, for, as it seems to me, no other reason than the fact that the authors names are incredibly similar.


However, once I got passed the seemingly shallow reasoning for writing an article such as this, I was able to actually enjoy it.  This article was a much easier read than the last assigned one and I felt like I understood the majority of it.  


"Emerson's model of spoken composition, proceeding from the recognition that every hstener is also a potential speaker ("How many orators sit mute there below!" [1903-04, 7. 63]), also captures the most charged moments of eloquence to appear in Ralph Ellison's Inuisible Man, a novel that measures the self-reliance of its nameless protagonist through his growing acumen as a public speaker."

This quote seems to relate both works by using a common concept of both, nameless speakers.  In the Invisible Man, the narrator makes himself known through his words, not through who he actually is.  


Though this was undeniably still difficult to read, made significantly more sense than the last essay.




Black Man Bank

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 ". . . the cast-iron figure of a very black, red-lipped and wide-mouthed Negro . . . stared up at me from the floor, his face an enormous grin, his single large black hand held palm up before his chest. It was a bank, a piece of early Americana, the kind of bank which, if a coin is placed in the hand and a lever pressed upon the back, will raise its arm and flip the coin into the grinning mouth."

This passage from Chapter Fifteen describes the coin bank that the narrator finds at Mary's right before he leaves to join the Brotherhood. Ellison uses this coin bank to symbolize the harmful racial stereotypes that the narrator has unsuccessfully tried to escape. This figure represents the obedient slave who is eager to entertain white people by, performing pet-like tricks for them.  Also, the bank portrays  a black man as an object - a decoration and a trivial toy to be played with and used by white people. After the narrator leaves, he becomes frustrated, unable to rid himself of this degrading coin bank. Thus, the bank illustrates another aspect of stereotype - it's stubborn way of following a person throughout his or her life.

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Matt Henderson on Blatantly Obvious...And i Loved It!: I actually didn't like this as
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