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https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/zoo-meerkat-expert-sentenced-over-assault-on-monkey-handler/2015/10/14/67ba3d42-728c-11e5-ba14-318f8e87a2fc_story.html

The cutline for this article is kind of amazing. It describes who I am looking at, then promptly why she matters and fits into the larger scheme of things. It turns an otherwise ordinary photo into an extraordinary one.

The lead, “A former meerkat expert at London Zoo has been ordered to pay compensation to a monkey handler she attacked with a wine glass in a love spat over a llama-keeper,” immediately grabs my attention. That doesn’t happen everyday, much less ever. Using animals as a description adds humor to the whole situation, making it almost seem unreal. Seems stranger than fiction, really.

Putting quotes around “nasty” allows the reader to understand this is just a colloquial term, and adds even more humor to the situation. It gives more dialogue to the story, as well.

The unusual situation makes this newsworthy, the titles of these people alone wonderful, much less all in one sentence. This also brings up the politics of workplace dating, however, and reels even more potential readers in.

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